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Peloton ad

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Replies

  • FoodBodyChanges
    FoodBodyChanges Posts: 29 Member
    This is a case of know your spouse. A husband who has expressed displeasure at his wife's physique gifting his wife exercise equipment is totally different than a husband gifting his wife exercise equipment because she wants it. And then there's the husband who gifts the $2,000 bike because it's something he wants, lol.
  • AdamAthletic
    AdamAthletic Posts: 2,887 Member
    I’m very ‘take it or leave it’ with them.
    I go to a pretty fancy health club and I’m sure that if I watched their advertisements, they’d be saying all kinds of rubbish.

    The bottom line is, I go there because I enjoy it and to me there is value in it.

    It’s similar with any product. The fact that their adverts are rediculois is purely a reflection of the hypercapitolist society we’re in and the fact that we respond better to those adds - in return increasing clicks/sales.

    Bottom line, buy if it’s your thing or leave and find something cheaper if it isn’t - it’s only an exercise bike at the end of the day and only has as much value as you give it.
  • magnusthenerd
    magnusthenerd Posts: 1,198 Member
    squirley13 wrote: »
    I will add my sense to this thread. I loved the commercial and those who disliked it have a limited understanding of fitness and natural endorphin experiences. I will state the ridiculous ridicule over the ad is not only obnoxious but toxic. My own personal experience with health gifts that my husband was also under prejudice of other’s opinions was when he got me a professional vintage doctor’s scale for my birthday and hid it in his work office til my birthday arrived. I was pleasantly surprised at his thoughtfulness as I wouldn’t have got one for myself because I thought it was too expensive but he wanted to spoil me ☺️♥️
    Let's just grant that claim for arguendo - I think I'm know fitness and endorphins, and felt the ad fell flat, though didn't hate it - isn't that a huge problem? Isn't one of the points of ads to get buy in from people that don't use the product already? Sure, some products sell to existing customers, but I don't think that's quite the audience Peloton wants to crack, is it?
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,128 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.
  • wmd1979
    wmd1979 Posts: 469 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    squirley13 wrote: »
    I will add my sense to this thread. I loved the commercial and those who disliked it have a limited understanding of fitness and natural endorphin experiences. I will state the ridiculous ridicule over the ad is not only obnoxious but toxic. My own personal experience with health gifts that my husband was also under prejudice of other’s opinions was when he got me a professional vintage doctor’s scale for my birthday and hid it in his work office til my birthday arrived. I was pleasantly surprised at his thoughtfulness as I wouldn’t have got one for myself because I thought it was too expensive but he wanted to spoil me ☺️♥️

    So because I disliked the ad, I have a limited understanding of fitness? I would love to hear how you jumped to that conclusion because its ridiculous. I disliked the ad, not because her husband gave her fitness equipment for Christmas, but because it was poorly done in a lot of ways. As pointed out repeatedly in this thread, she talks about how life changing this bike is, yet its not exactly clear what benefits she receives from it. Its also odd to me just how anxious she is in the beginning for her first ride. The worst thing about the ad in my opinion is that the Christmas gift she gives her husband the following year is a video about how much she enjoyed her previous years gift. I feel like he kind of got screwed on this years gift especially after buying her such a life changing gift the previous year. Nothing about the ad had me outraged, however I do think it was stupid, and I don't believe its toxic to ridicule an ad that is probably deserving of some ridicule. Its great you liked it, but there is no need to insult others who didn't. The ad clearly spoke to you in a different way than it did others. That is what advertising is designed to do.

    To be honest, given our litigious attitude here in the US i doubt Peleron could really make any claims on specific benefits and went with the "life changing" as a safe way out.

    Seriously? Look at some of the claims made by other "fitness" products and tell me that Peloton couldn't have clarified any benefits. There are infomercials for other products that claim all sorts of things, and its not hard to claim a benefit as long as its clarified that those results might not be typical for every individual. I think Peloton is intentionally marketing their products as life changing without making specific claims for a reason. They seem to prefer it to appear to be a magical product.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,766 Member
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    squirley13 wrote: »
    I will add my sense to this thread. I loved the commercial and those who disliked it have a limited understanding of fitness and natural endorphin experiences. I will state the ridiculous ridicule over the ad is not only obnoxious but toxic. My own personal experience with health gifts that my husband was also under prejudice of other’s opinions was when he got me a professional vintage doctor’s scale for my birthday and hid it in his work office til my birthday arrived. I was pleasantly surprised at his thoughtfulness as I wouldn’t have got one for myself because I thought it was too expensive but he wanted to spoil me ☺️♥️

    So because I disliked the ad, I have a limited understanding of fitness? I would love to hear how you jumped to that conclusion because its ridiculous. I disliked the ad, not because her husband gave her fitness equipment for Christmas, but because it was poorly done in a lot of ways. As pointed out repeatedly in this thread, she talks about how life changing this bike is, yet its not exactly clear what benefits she receives from it. Its also odd to me just how anxious she is in the beginning for her first ride. The worst thing about the ad in my opinion is that the Christmas gift she gives her husband the following year is a video about how much she enjoyed her previous years gift. I feel like he kind of got screwed on this years gift especially after buying her such a life changing gift the previous year. Nothing about the ad had me outraged, however I do think it was stupid, and I don't believe its toxic to ridicule an ad that is probably deserving of some ridicule. Its great you liked it, but there is no need to insult others who didn't. The ad clearly spoke to you in a different way than it did others. That is what advertising is designed to do.

    To be honest, given our litigious attitude here in the US i doubt Peleron could really make any claims on specific benefits and went with the "life changing" as a safe way out.

    Seriously? Look at some of the claims made by other "fitness" products and tell me that Peloton couldn't have clarified any benefits. There are infomercials for other products that claim all sorts of things, and its not hard to claim a benefit as long as its clarified that those results might not be typical for every individual. I think Peloton is intentionally marketing their products as life changing without making specific claims for a reason. They seem to prefer it to appear to be a magical product.

    I've been watching stuff on YouTube lately, and there are at least a couple of other similar products that are by other manufacturers (Nordic is one) that are advertised almost identically (but for the specific ad in question). For example, one of them is two people, with their bikes set up in high rises next to huge windows with a view who can see each other as they compete. There definitely seems to be an idea that the more mystical life-changing and also "look at how cool we are" appeals will work, without the specific fitness claims that are often made (see any of the old late night fitness equipment commercials). Like I said above, I see this with things like OrangeTheory, SoulCycle, and even CrossFit to some extent too. It's something about the current age.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,225 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,225 Member
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    squirley13 wrote: »
    I will add my sense to this thread. I loved the commercial and those who disliked it have a limited understanding of fitness and natural endorphin experiences. I will state the ridiculous ridicule over the ad is not only obnoxious but toxic. My own personal experience with health gifts that my husband was also under prejudice of other’s opinions was when he got me a professional vintage doctor’s scale for my birthday and hid it in his work office til my birthday arrived. I was pleasantly surprised at his thoughtfulness as I wouldn’t have got one for myself because I thought it was too expensive but he wanted to spoil me ☺️♥️

    So because I disliked the ad, I have a limited understanding of fitness? I would love to hear how you jumped to that conclusion because its ridiculous. I disliked the ad, not because her husband gave her fitness equipment for Christmas, but because it was poorly done in a lot of ways. As pointed out repeatedly in this thread, she talks about how life changing this bike is, yet its not exactly clear what benefits she receives from it. Its also odd to me just how anxious she is in the beginning for her first ride. The worst thing about the ad in my opinion is that the Christmas gift she gives her husband the following year is a video about how much she enjoyed her previous years gift. I feel like he kind of got screwed on this years gift especially after buying her such a life changing gift the previous year. Nothing about the ad had me outraged, however I do think it was stupid, and I don't believe its toxic to ridicule an ad that is probably deserving of some ridicule. Its great you liked it, but there is no need to insult others who didn't. The ad clearly spoke to you in a different way than it did others. That is what advertising is designed to do.

    To be honest, given our litigious attitude here in the US i doubt Peleron could really make any claims on specific benefits and went with the "life changing" as a safe way out.

    Seriously? Look at some of the claims made by other "fitness" products and tell me that Peloton couldn't have clarified any benefits. There are infomercials for other products that claim all sorts of things, and its not hard to claim a benefit as long as its clarified that those results might not be typical for every individual. I think Peloton is intentionally marketing their products as life changing without making specific claims for a reason. They seem to prefer it to appear to be a magical product.

    Who knows. Maybe they didn't want to muddy up the ad with disclaimers.
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,769 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    I got the vibe that he doesn’t let his trophy wife handle money, so her “gifts” to him have to be nonsense like thank you videos. It would explain why she’s so anxious.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,225 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    I got the vibe that he doesn’t let his trophy wife handle money, so her “gifts” to him have to be nonsense like thank you videos. It would explain why she’s so anxious.

    Thats the story in the commercial. Supposedly the actor gave his real life girlfriend a bike.
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,769 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    I got the vibe that he doesn’t let his trophy wife handle money, so her “gifts” to him have to be nonsense like thank you videos. It would explain why she’s so anxious.

    Thats the story in the commercial. Supposedly the actor gave his real life girlfriend a bike.

    Oh, sorry, I wasn’t paying close attention to what you were replying to, and knew another poster thought that a thank you video in exchange for a Peloton was a bad trade.

    Yep, you’re probably right about the free Peloton. Although his real life girlfriend looks like she needs one even less than his commercial wife!
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,128 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,255 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).

    If the social media platforms are so good at monitoring this behavior, how is it that the FTC still finds violators to bring cases against or send warning letters to? (And they don't have the resources to take action on every instance.)

    https://search.usa.gov/search?query=disclosure+by+social+media+influencer&submit.x=0&submit.y=0&affiliate=ftc_prod
  • raven56706
    raven56706 Posts: 907 Member
    The bike has been awesome for me and works well for me in cardio terms.
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,128 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).

    If the social media platforms are so good at monitoring this behavior, how is it that the FTC still finds violators to bring cases against or send warning letters to? (And they don't have the resources to take action on every instance.)

    https://search.usa.gov/search?query=disclosure+by+social+media+influencer&submit.x=0&submit.y=0&affiliate=ftc_prod

    How is the FTC bringing cases against violators if this kind of thing isn't being policed?

    Speaking from experience (I work with paid sponsorships on YouTube and Instagram), I have enormous doubts that the instagram post in question wouldn't have an #ad disclosure if the bike was provided by Peloton.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,255 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).

    If the social media platforms are so good at monitoring this behavior, how is it that the FTC still finds violators to bring cases against or send warning letters to? (And they don't have the resources to take action on every instance.)

    https://search.usa.gov/search?query=disclosure+by+social+media+influencer&submit.x=0&submit.y=0&affiliate=ftc_prod

    How is the FTC bringing cases against violators if this kind of thing isn't being policed?

    Speaking from experience (I work with paid sponsorships on YouTube and Instagram), I have enormous doubts that the instagram post in question wouldn't have an #ad disclosure if the bike was provided by Peloton.

    There's a difference between your earlier position that X doesn't happen because it's against the rules and entities are monitoring for it and your current implied position that catching X cases indicates there is policing and therefore there are no X + n cases that aren't being caught or triggering enforcement.
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,128 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).

    If the social media platforms are so good at monitoring this behavior, how is it that the FTC still finds violators to bring cases against or send warning letters to? (And they don't have the resources to take action on every instance.)

    https://search.usa.gov/search?query=disclosure+by+social+media+influencer&submit.x=0&submit.y=0&affiliate=ftc_prod

    How is the FTC bringing cases against violators if this kind of thing isn't being policed?

    Speaking from experience (I work with paid sponsorships on YouTube and Instagram), I have enormous doubts that the instagram post in question wouldn't have an #ad disclosure if the bike was provided by Peloton.

    There's a difference between your earlier position that X doesn't happen because it's against the rules and entities are monitoring for it and your current implied position that catching X cases indicates there is policing and therefore there are no X + n cases that aren't being caught or triggering enforcement.

    Not only did I not say that it doesn't happen, I said that it does.
    My earlier position was not that it doesn't happen but that it's highly unlikely that it happened here.
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I love it, kudos to him!!!

    Peloton husband, despite the controversy, gifts real-life girlfriend a ... Peloton bike

    When life imitates art ...

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/celebrities/2019/12/26/peloton-husband-gives-girlfriend-exercise-bike-christmas/2750142001/

    My money is on the idea Peloton provided the bike free in exchange for the Instagram post.

    If that were the case, he'd have been obligated to disclose as much (or at least tag the post as #ad or #sponsored) in the post.

    Maybe they are supposed to but it's the internet how many times do you think rules are broken?

    Instagram/Facebook/YouTube etc. all monitor that kind of thing in a big way (and those who make or support their living through social media know it).
    Chances are a small/beginner influencer could be ignorant to the rules or try to break them and not get caught but anyone with prominence is most likely going to get busted.
    A professional actor/model with as much notoriety as peloton husband is going to fall into the latter category (the peloton marketing department would be aware and watching that as well).