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Coronavirus prep

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  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 960 Member Member Posts: 960 Member
    ahoy_m8 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ahoy_m8 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I’ve not seen any statistics showing which shot people with breakthrough cases got. It seems like that would be an interesting statistic.

    If anyone has seen the breakdown, please post.


    I don't know if somebody (CDC??) is keeping track of which vaccine has the most break-thru cases, or if testing centers ask for the name of the vaccine that a person received. It would be interesting to know.

    I was reading online (Mr. Google to the rescue) that breakthrough cases may be under counted and underestimated since not all vaccinated people feeling sick or "thinking" that they got covid seek testing. Some just quarantine themselves for few days. In addition, some vaccinated people that might have been infected with the new variant could be totally un-symptomatic, but still able to spread the virus. That is why masks are still needed.

    I agree. My dh was sick last week with a bad cold; I'm guessing but we had no proof. When he called the dr. they told him not to worry about getting tested because he had Covid back in November and was vaccinated in March/April. They only asked if he was running a fever. With all the breakthrough infections going on of vaccinated people.....I didn't agree with his dr. at all. :(
    Our numbers are low but are they really, if people aren't getting tested the way they were?

    Could go ahead and get tested. My mom and several people in the same house have had a bad cold lately. She had Covid August 2020 and was vaccinated earlier this year. If not for negative tests, I would have guessed Covid again. But people still do get other respiratory infections.

    He's fine now. But it still baffles me why they didn't at least give him the option. He probably could've pushed a test for himself but he's one of those people that a) believe everything his dr. tells him and b) is lazy. :( They told him people are getting bad colds in our area so he went with that. :s But then how would they know if they're all bad colds and not Covid if they're not still pushing the tests?
    He feels justified by his drs. decision because he didn't have a fever and didn't lose his sense of taste or smell. I reminded him that back when we contracted it in November, my only symptom was fatigue and I was tested because he'd had a "cold" and got tested. I cannot remember if he had a fever then or not.

    They're getting lax with the testing. :( SMH

    And to @lokihen, I agree with you.


    But if it is Covid, which with vaccination is generally equivalent to a bad cold, then what is the point of testing to confirm that? At some point we move on from the pandemic "panic" stage of this, to the endemic stage - where yes, people are still going to get Covid, even with the vaccine, and they are going to recover without treatment in the vast majority of cases.

    I read recently that the Delta variant is as contagious as chicken pox, if that is the case then we are not going to eradicate it by testing and isolating people indefinitely. The only way through this now is to vaccinate as many as possible so that it doesn't cause mass severe illness and death. The messaging that we are somehow going to "beat" Covid by eradicating it from the population through lockdowns, testing and isolation is outdated. It isn't going to happen.

    1) So the infected person knows that he needs to quarantine and protect vulnerable people
    2) To give public health officials relevant data to understand local risk factors, possible spreader events and long term vaccine efficacy metrics.

    My point is that at a certain point as the disease becomes endemic quarantining infected people with mild illness isn’t feasible. At a certain point (I believe that point to be now in my specific area of the world) we have to shift our containment strategies away from “positive cases” to more meaningful metrics, such as hospitalizations and deaths. Mass testing of mildly ill people in a post vaccine scenario just doesn’t make sense. That is the whole point of the vaccine program, to keep people alive and out of the hospital, even after they are exposed.


    Why not? What about kids under 12 -- just let them get infected?

    I just wanted to add to this - public health restrictions, including school closures, were never put in place to protect children. They were put in place to protect adults and the elderly who children come in contact with. This made sense in a pre-vaccine environment, in a post-vaccine environment (for adults) it no longer makes sense.

    If Covid affected adults and the elderly the same as it affects children do you think the world would have basically shut down the way it did? Of course it wouldn’t have, we would have been told to wash our hands, stay home when we are sick, and go about our day otherwise. There wouldn’t even be a vaccine because we wouldn’t need one.
    edited August 4
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 9,149 Member Member Posts: 9,149 Member
    I'm not sure if I have shared this already - apologies if so.

    Data from a few days ago
    Latest outbreak in NSW (state of Australia)

    Deaths: 13
    Vaccinated: 0
    Unvaccinated: 13

    Currently in ICU's: 54
    Vaccinated: 4
    Unvaccinated:50

    What's the vaccination rate in NSW? Without knowing that, one cannot logically draw any conclusions from the above data.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 21,644 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21,644 Member
    On messaging: It sure doesn't help when messaging from the CDC and media outlets focus on a statistical outlier like Provincetown where the vaccinated proved to be more likely to get sick than the unvaccinated. I just can't believe the data or it must be an outlier, so why focus on it so much?!

    I think it's getting more attention because it provided substantial new data on how the virus may behave among those who are vaccinated, adding to our knowledge on that aspect. I don't think the attention is primarily due to the size/scope of that outbreak.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,766 Member Member Posts: 2,766 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    My wife and daughter had to fly to Ohio last week. Daughter wasn't feeling well for like two days when she got back. She's on the mend now, but it sounded like a break through infection (she's vaxxed, as we all are, by the Pfizer vaccine). Wouldn't have went but my wife's only sister is ready to pass and she wanted to see her while she still could. They ate inside while in Cincinnati a few times and took some Ubers. I would imagine that's how she was exposed. Or on the plane. Who knows. They had four flights and one had a guy coughing behind them the entire flight.

    Very, very glad they are both vaccinated. If she has it, it's been very, very mild (no temp, oxygen readings great -- heck, hers are better than mine!).

    Was your daughter tested and found positive for COVID? If not, it is possible that it is not a break through COVID infection but one of the many other illnesses we've had around prior to COVID's existence.

    No, she wasn't. She doesn't work outside the home and didn't need to go anywhere. Plus, no fever or oxygen level drops. We didn't feel it was necessary (and neither my wife or I go outside the home much at all). She's feeling better now. Could it have been jetlag or seasonal allergies? Sure, it's possible.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,766 Member Member Posts: 2,766 Member
    ahoy_m8 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    I'm listening to an interview with Dr Ashish Jha and he is saying that if you get past sensationalized media reports and "leaks", it is a tiny fraction of vaxxed people getting sick. And the data about vaxxed people being able to spread it suggests that while they CAN spread it, they are much less likely to. There are several different variables that go into being "infectious", not just how many virus particles are in your nose at any given time. He said his interpretation of the current data is more like a vaxxed person might infect one other person if they happen to catch them at the wrong time. He's concerned that fear mongering headlines are over dramatizing a slight weakness that might rarely come into play. Obviously that's just one read of the situation, but I thought a more positive view of what the new data might mean could be helpful for some of us, myself included, who could use that balance lol.

    I have read these reports, too. I have seen a range of 1% of current infections being vaxxed people up to 17%, depending on the locality. This leaves me still trying to understand how 6 vaxxed young women (DD+friends) went to an outdoor concert and spent the next day together, and the 3 vaxxed in Feb got sick 2 days later (tested positive) while the 3 vaxxed in April did not get sick (tested negative). Sure, there are always data outliers. Maybe that is all that is going on here. Nonetheless, it seems like a good time to keep collecting data to better understand what is going on than to cease testing or to cease collecting data.

    I wonder if the unvaxxed ones had it prior. I know among my daughter's and son's friends, most of the ones that lack caution have also already had pretty significant cases of Covid-19. My son was sick for nearly two weeks with it and everyone at his work got it at the same time (a bunch of young solar sales people in SoCal -- none of them were wearing masks inside their workplace and regularly having in person meetings). Same with my daughter's friends. A large group of them gathered in Austin during the pandemic (my daughter didn't go) and all got it. Every one of them that went. So, it would not surprise me if my daughter got more mildly sick, even with the vaccine, then someone that was sick in bed for weeks with actual Covid-19, by being exposed presently.

    I believe the same young people that have been vaxxed have also mostly been cautious the entire time. But yeah, I'd love to know more data on this.
    edited August 5
  • ahoy_m8ahoy_m8 Member Posts: 2,500 Member Member Posts: 2,500 Member
    ahoy_m8 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    I'm listening to an interview with Dr Ashish Jha and he is saying that if you get past sensationalized media reports and "leaks", it is a tiny fraction of vaxxed people getting sick. And the data about vaxxed people being able to spread it suggests that while they CAN spread it, they are much less likely to. There are several different variables that go into being "infectious", not just how many virus particles are in your nose at any given time. He said his interpretation of the current data is more like a vaxxed person might infect one other person if they happen to catch them at the wrong time. He's concerned that fear mongering headlines are over dramatizing a slight weakness that might rarely come into play. Obviously that's just one read of the situation, but I thought a more positive view of what the new data might mean could be helpful for some of us, myself included, who could use that balance lol.

    I have read these reports, too. I have seen a range of 1% of current infections being vaxxed people up to 17%, depending on the locality. This leaves me still trying to understand how 6 vaxxed young women (DD+friends) went to an outdoor concert and spent the next day together, and the 3 vaxxed in Feb got sick 2 days later (tested positive) while the 3 vaxxed in April did not get sick (tested negative). Sure, there are always data outliers. Maybe that is all that is going on here. Nonetheless, it seems like a good time to keep collecting data to better understand what is going on than to cease testing or to cease collecting data.

    I wonder if the unvaxxed ones had it prior. I know among my daughter's and son's friends, most of the ones that lack caution have also already had pretty significant cases of Covid-19. My son was sick for nearly two weeks with it and everyone at his work got it at the same time (a bunch of young solar sales people in SoCal -- none of them were wearing masks inside their workplace and regularly having in person meetings). Same with my daughter's friends. A large group of them gathered in Austin during the pandemic (my daughter didn't go) and all got it. Every one of them that went. So, it would not surprise me if my daughter got more mildly sick, even with the vaccine, then someone that was sick in bed for weeks with actual Covid-19, by being exposed presently.

    I believe the same young people that have been vaxxed have also mostly been cautious the entire time. But yeah, I'd love to know more data on this.

    All were vaxxed-- 3 in Feb, 3 in April. I have no insight into who had which vaccines or may have had covid previously. I'm sure DD knows.
    edited August 5
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