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Ezekiel Bread

ReenieHJReenieHJ Member Posts: 4,969 Member Member Posts: 4,969 Member
Is this bread actually worth the expense? It sounds calorie dense. My niece eats it and doesn't really care for it that much(then why eat it is my thought). I came across a couple recipes for making it; sounds like too much work. :)
Just wondering what people's thoughts are on the stuff?
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Replies

  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member
    I enjoy the taste and texture. I wouldn't buy it just to buy it, there are other ways to get all the nutrients in it.
  • Chef_BarbellChef_Barbell Member Posts: 6,233 Member Member Posts: 6,233 Member
    This bread has too much going on for me to enjoy it.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 18,139 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,139 Member
    I like the Ezekial pita and tortillas (commercial, Food for Life brand) for flavor, texture, satiation and a little bit of protein (comparing nutrition to other competitive things I'd enjoy eating, not in the abstract necessarily). I've never had the sliced loaf kind (just not a food that I eat even remotely often, sliced bread).

    I don't eat things just because they're theoretically good for me: Life is too short. For decades now, fat and thin, I've preferred whole-grain bread-esque things with some weight and texture, but have eaten little sliced bread. As a cut during weight loss, I switched from mostly large Ezekial tortillas to mostly small ones.

    If you like the concept, maybe try a commercial one?
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I like the Ezekial pita and tortillas (commercial, Food for Life brand) for flavor, texture, satiation and a little bit of protein (comparing nutrition to other competitive things I'd enjoy eating, not in the abstract necessarily). I've never had the sliced loaf kind (just not a food that I eat even remotely often, sliced bread).

    I don't eat things just because they're theoretically good for me: Life is too short. For decades now, fat and thin, I've preferred whole-grain bread-esque things with some weight and texture, but have eaten little sliced bread. As a cut during weight loss, I switched from mostly large Ezekial tortillas to mostly small ones.

    If you like the concept, maybe try a commercial one?

    What I personally like about Ezekiel bread is that it freezes really well. I'm kind of like you, I just don't eat sliced bread that often -- probably about 1 loaf a year total when I get a particular urge for a sandwich or a piece of toast. I keep the loaf in my freezer and just thaw out what I plan on using. I'm sure it's not the only bread that could handle this treatment (baked goods, in my experience, mostly seem to handle freezing fine), but I've just got in the habit of using it now.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,138 Member Member Posts: 23,138 Member
    I have Ezekiel and home made bread in my freezer right now. Ezekiel not tasting as good is a Pro - it's a challenge for me to moderate home made bread, and I like it with butter or EVOO. In general, products made from flour are potentially problematic for me for a variety of reasons. I don't have this issue with bread made from sprouted grains. I also find Ezekiel more filling and I'm sure the extra fiber plays a role in that.

    I agree that Dave's tastes better, but again, not as filling for me.

    Although I love to experiment, making bread from sprouted grains isn't something I plan to try. A caller was asking about it on the Milk St Radio cooking podcast not long ago, which reinforced this inclination.

    But if anyone has a recipe and pictures, I'd be interested.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member, Premium Posts: 6,502 Member Member, Premium Posts: 6,502 Member
    What I personally like about Ezekiel bread is that it freezes really well. I'm kind of like you, I just don't eat sliced bread that often -- probably about 1 loaf a year total when I get a particular urge for a sandwich or a piece of toast. I keep the loaf in my freezer and just thaw out what I plan on using. I'm sure it's not the only bread that could handle this treatment (baked goods, in my experience, mostly seem to handle freezing fine), but I've just got in the habit of using it now.

    Same here. I rarely eat sliced bread (or, really, any bread, including pitas or wraps of any sort), and when I do it's usually in some sort of toasted format. I tried Ezekiel when I was in the mood for a grilled cheese a while back, and thought it was pretty good. Given how little I eat it, I didn't really pay attention to cost. I might have french toast on Christmas and will see how it works for that, I assume fine.
  • Armygirlarmyof1Armygirlarmyof1 Member, Premium Posts: 29 Member Member, Premium Posts: 29 Member
    If you research the Ezekial bread, it is based off the diet and religious needs of the early Jewish ppl. It's a plant based bread that provides protein. While lamb, chicken and fish were ate for protein, this bread seen many through leaner times.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member
    If you research the Ezekial bread, it is based off the diet and religious needs of the early Jewish ppl. It's a plant based bread that provides protein. While lamb, chicken and fish were ate for protein, this bread seen many through leaner times.

    It actually wasn't based on the diet of "early Jewish ppl," it was based on a recipe supposedly given by God to the prophet Ezekial in the days before Jerusalem was destroyed. Ezekial was supposed to prepare himself to eat it so he'd know how to survive in very hard times. It's literally struggle food.

    Jewish people at that time and region had access to these foods, sure, but it wasn't their practice to combine these together and eat them as bread. Their preference would have been more similar to what WE typically prefer in breads.
  • mailinatormailinator Member Posts: 28 Member Member Posts: 28 Member
    I tried Ezekial because they offer very-low-sodium and zero-sodium loaves and I'm sodium sensitive. Tasteless but decent as a cracker if toasted. Eventually, I went back to Dave's Killer Bread which is the same price as Ezekial but tastes a lot better. DKB has the least sodium (105mg) of all the breads that I consider tasty.
  • TravelerravenTravelerraven Member Posts: 46 Member Member Posts: 46 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    Is this bread actually worth the expense? It sounds calorie dense. My niece eats it and doesn't really care for it that much(then why eat it is my thought). I came across a couple recipes for making it; sounds like too much work. :)
    Just wondering what people's thoughts are on the stuff?

    Only if you want it for a specific reason or some else is willing to bake it for you. I like to use it for road trip sandwiches.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 38,471 Member Member Posts: 38,471 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    Is this bread actually worth the expense? It sounds calorie dense. My niece eats it and doesn't really care for it that much(then why eat it is my thought). I came across a couple recipes for making it; sounds like too much work. :)
    Just wondering what people's thoughts are on the stuff?

    Only about 80 calories per slice for store bought, which isn't bad for bread. I personally prefer Dave's Killer...the 21 whole grains and seeds. I eat toast with my eggs most mornings and I eat a lot of sandwiches...I prefer the bread toasted in general, even for sandwiches.

    I'm not much for baking, so pretty much making any bread is probably going to be a no for me.
  • siberiantarragonsiberiantarragon Member Posts: 75 Member Member Posts: 75 Member
    Shop-Rite has some store-brand dupes for Ezekiel bread in the freezer section that are a couple of dollars cheaper ($4.79 a loaf vs. $6.50-ish for Ezekiel bread -- and yes, food is expensive in my area LOL). That's what I use. I eat it because it has a low glycemic index.

    I thought this type of sprouted bread was a little weird at first, but I quickly got used to it and now I actually prefer it taste and texture-wise over "regular" bread. I like that it's really dense and not too sweet. The most annoying thing about it is that the slices sometimes stick together in the freezer, and I don't like having to put it in the fridge to thaw out because then you have to eat it within 7 days since it has no preservatives.

    I've never tried Dave's Killer Bread but I'm not sure it's accurate to say it's comparable to Ezekiel-type bread, since it's not made the same way. It also has a lot of added sugar (up to 5g per slice), which is why I've never tried it.
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Member, Premium Posts: 857 Member Member, Premium Posts: 857 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    Is this bread actually worth the expense? It sounds calorie dense. My niece eats it and doesn't really care for it that much(then why eat it is my thought). I came across a couple recipes for making it; sounds like too much work. :)
    Just wondering what people's thoughts are on the stuff?

    @ReenieHJ - It’s all about taste - if you enjoy it and it fits your nutritional needs - enjoy.. if not move on. It’s only worth the expense if you enjoy eating it. Beluga caviar is expensive .. but if you enjoy it...

    Taste is subjective. I would recommend doing a taste test and reading the nutritional profile .. does it fit your needs? Have your tried it?

    I personally prefer Ezekial over other grocery store varieties ..(or Dave’s- was mentioned above) .. but see above ... everyone’s taste is subjective.

    I also don’t want a lot of added sugar — Dave’s bread varieties typically includes cane sugar and molasses...Not for my dietary needs..but also just a personal preference .. ( I usually buy from my local bakery if I am buying bread or make my own..)

    Re: being calorie dense: My neighborhood grocery store has varieties including -Ezekial 4:9 and Dave’s 21 grains ... the Ezekial is *80 calories per slice* .. the Dave’s is *110 per slice*.. so for me from a calorie counting perspective .. Ezekiel wins. ... but I also rarely eat bread. Many of my family members are on low sodium diets and Ezekial also has some of the lowest sodium counts around. Add that to the no added oil content - another plus for my personal dietary needs and those of my family. Ezekial is a personal back up in the freezer when needed.

    But as always - taste, check nutrient profile.. like? ✔️ Win!

    edited January 13
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Member, Premium Posts: 857 Member Member, Premium Posts: 857 Member
    If you research the Ezekial bread, it is based off the diet and religious needs of the early Jewish ppl. It's a plant based bread that provides protein. While lamb, chicken and fish were ate for protein, this bread seen many through leaner times.

    It actually wasn't based on the diet of "early Jewish ppl," it was based on a recipe supposedly given by God to the prophet Ezekial in the days before Jerusalem was destroyed. Ezekial was supposed to prepare himself to eat it so he'd know how to survive in very hard times. It's literally struggle food.

    Jewish people at that time and region had access to these foods, sure, but it wasn't their practice to combine these together and eat them as bread. Their preference would have been more similar to what WE typically prefer in breads.

    @janejellyroll - agree re Ezekial 4:9 in the Bible - I always thought ancient Israelite bread was 3 ingredients- barley/millet flour, water, yeast. (No salt, honey - rare at that time) also yeast not for Passover of course.

    Would that be the same as our general modern tastes?
  • elmusho1989elmusho1989 Member Posts: 141 Member Member Posts: 141 Member
    Anyone know where to buy this type of bread in Ireland? Seems like a pain to make
  • skelterhelterskelterhelter Member Posts: 750 Member Member Posts: 750 Member
    I just tried Ezekiel bread for the first time last week and I quite like it. Toasted with some butter and jam <3
  • Armygirlarmyof1Armygirlarmyof1 Member, Premium Posts: 29 Member Member, Premium Posts: 29 Member
    Anyone know where to buy this type of bread in Ireland? Seems like a pain to make

    Have you tried the freezer section of your store. Thats where it is here in the states.
  • KulmanduKulmandu Member Posts: 4 Member Member Posts: 4 Member
    Ezekiel Bread is my favorite bread, hands down, of any bread I've ever eaten. It's a meal in itself. I haven't bought any since I gave up wheat as part of my weight loss plan, and it's one of the things I truly miss. Ezekiel bread, toasted, with butter and apricot preserves is heaven.
  • TheresaM787TheresaM787 Member Posts: 16 Member Member Posts: 16 Member
    I love the cinnamon raisin Ezekiel bread. I usually use if for open-faced egg sandwiches or tuna salad sandwiches.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member Member, Premium Posts: 24,571 Member
    If you research the Ezekial bread, it is based off the diet and religious needs of the early Jewish ppl. It's a plant based bread that provides protein. While lamb, chicken and fish were ate for protein, this bread seen many through leaner times.

    It actually wasn't based on the diet of "early Jewish ppl," it was based on a recipe supposedly given by God to the prophet Ezekial in the days before Jerusalem was destroyed. Ezekial was supposed to prepare himself to eat it so he'd know how to survive in very hard times. It's literally struggle food.

    Jewish people at that time and region had access to these foods, sure, but it wasn't their practice to combine these together and eat them as bread. Their preference would have been more similar to what WE typically prefer in breads.

    @janejellyroll - agree re Ezekial 4:9 in the Bible - I always thought ancient Israelite bread was 3 ingredients- barley/millet flour, water, yeast. (No salt, honey - rare at that time) also yeast not for Passover of course.

    Would that be the same as our general modern tastes?

    Breads were made with barley, millet, and wheat in the Middle East. It's my understanding that wheat was perceived as more of a luxury. I'm not sure why they wouldn't have added salt -- not only does it make bread more palatable, it also helps with the quality of the bread, so I would have expected them to add it.

    The main point is that Ezekial Bread isn't a reconstruction of a traditional food, it's a modern invention based on our ideas of healthfulness. Almost universally around the world throughout history when people have a choice to choose more refined flour and lighter bread, that's what populations vote for with their dollars. (I get that some individuals may prefer denser bread, but they're not the norm). It's actually pretty interesting to read about the political/social baggage that we've attached to different styles of bread. In the US, it's long been the focus of intense concerns about the decline of our health, purity, and work ethic, stuff that funneled into our current moment of concern with gluten and carbohydrates.

    When we choose a bread it may feel like a simple choice, but we're actually participating in a much longer human conversation (even if we don't realize it).
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