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  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 19,781 Member Member, Premium Posts: 19,781 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Psychgrrl wrote: »
    lorib642 wrote: »
    Just got 2nd shot at cvs and they gave me a 20% off coupon. They have given me coupon for flu shot before. I don't think it would be something that would draw anyone to get vaccinated but is a nice bonus.

    Not sure where you are, but there are lots of free or “small donation” flu shot clinics in the US. I didn’t realize people would need a 20% off coupon for a flu shot.

    It's to induce a person to take their insurance-covered vaccination need to a particular pharmacy, which will be paid by the insurance company. My flu vax is "free" (to me) because my insurance company pays for it. My pharmacy gives the coupon (not why I go there for the shot; it's just convenient - I don't necessarily use the coupon, but they always give it to me).

    It's not about "need" on the part of the person being vaccinated, I think. For sure, it's not an inducement to me to be vaccinated . . . at most, it could be an inducement about *where* to be vaccinated (it's not even that, for me).

    As I understand it, it's 20% off anything in the store day of when you get vaccinated there, right? I think Psychgrrl was thinking it was 20% the cost of the vaccination.

    I think more recently it may be $5 off a $20 purchase, but if I recall correctly from the last time I got a vax at CVS, the coupon was good until an expiration date ways out, not just on the day of the vaccination, and there were some limitations on what you could purchase and apply it (I think exclusions might be lottery tickets, gift cards, maybe alcoholic bevs, . . . but that's a guess, based on other coupons from CVS). The vaccination itself is advertised as "free*" and the asterisk is if you have insurance that covers it, i.e., no co-pay.
  • PsychgrrlPsychgrrl Member Posts: 3,134 Member Member Posts: 3,134 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Next up, they offered their employees $100 in pay (subject to the usual taxes/withholdings, so probably around $70 net) to be vaccinated, explicitly saying they would not *require* employees, patrons, etc. to be vaccinated


    I definitely cant see that flying here (even if all employees could get vaccinated which most probably cant under current criteria here)

    Occupations for which vaccination is required (not Covid vac - flu vac and other vacs or serology proofs of immunity) - all employees have to do it, like it or not. No incentives, pay or otherwise - you do it or don't work

    Same with visitors to nursing homes - you have to have had current flu vaccine unless medically contraindicated (very rare) or under 6 months old

    No incentives, pay or otherwise - you do it or don't work/volunteer/visit

    Some businesses with salaried employees let them get the vax on company time. This business is all hourly-pay. Part of their representation is that this is close to equivalent to letting employees get the vax during work hours.

    In the US, even this has attracted lightning from the public. *Requiring* employees to be vaccinated is even more controversial. That may be shocking, or something people elsewhere reject . . . but inducements play slightly better here than mandates. I don't love everything about our culture, but it is what it is, and this business (like all others) is swimming in it.


    Ive been vaccinated on company time, on wages, as has my husband - that is not unusual when the vaccines are supplied on site

    Many companies cover the cost of the actual vaccines (flu vaccine) - either through a contract with an external provider or reimbursing receipts - but the vaccines are not compulsory unless relevant to the job

    But nowhere pays you extra wages if you are vaccinated - either it is a requirement of the job or it isnt - and it can only be a requirement if it is relevant to the job - eg health care, child care.
    A steelworks or burger place would not be able to enforce it.
    But a steelworks can enforce mandatory drug testing - because they operate heavy machinery and it is relevant to the job - that is the bottom line with anything mandatory.

    I was vaccinated on company time, too. But my work arranged for the vaccination, so that made sense. Our campus is offering transportation to students who cannot afford to get to the vaccination sites on their own. While the vaccination is free, the Uber ride there and back (twice) isn't. And most of our students don't have cars. And the bus system doesn't help right now.
  • PsychgrrlPsychgrrl Member Posts: 3,134 Member Member Posts: 3,134 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Psychgrrl wrote: »
    lorib642 wrote: »
    Just got 2nd shot at cvs and they gave me a 20% off coupon. They have given me coupon for flu shot before. I don't think it would be something that would draw anyone to get vaccinated but is a nice bonus.

    Not sure where you are, but there are lots of free or “small donation” flu shot clinics in the US. I didn’t realize people would need a 20% off coupon for a flu shot.

    It's to induce a person to take their insurance-covered vaccination need to a particular pharmacy, which will be paid by the insurance company. My flu vax is "free" (to me) because my insurance company pays for it. My pharmacy gives the coupon (not why I go there for the shot; it's just convenient - I don't necessarily use the coupon, but they always give it to me).

    It's not about "need" on the part of the person being vaccinated, I think. For sure, it's not an inducement to me to be vaccinated . . . at most, it could be an inducement about *where* to be vaccinated (it's not even that, for me).

    As I understand it, it's 20% off anything in the store day of when you get vaccinated there, right? I think Psychgrrl was thinking it was 20% the cost of the vaccination.

    I totally was! :p
  • PsychgrrlPsychgrrl Member Posts: 3,134 Member Member Posts: 3,134 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »

    Actually, now that I think of it, our office building does an annual flu vaccine event (couple of days) and I think they usually give out donuts. I've never gotten the shot there, and to be honest I've been pretty bad about getting the flu shot since I've never gotten the flu and even the very mild inconvenience seemed not worth it (I have gotten it when I happened to be at a doctors during the relevant time and was offered it. This year changed that for me (I got it this year, at a Walgreens), and I will get it in the future.

    I was, too. Until my mom's assisted living home had a bad flu outbreak about five years ago. They stopped letting people visit without being vaccinated. And then work required it this year. And they brought the clinic to campus. Made it even more convenient. But with COVID, i think my motivation was a little different this year, too. Even with the requirement. No snackies, though. :)
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 19,781 Member Member, Premium Posts: 19,781 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Next up, they offered their employees $100 in pay (subject to the usual taxes/withholdings, so probably around $70 net) to be vaccinated, explicitly saying they would not *require* employees, patrons, etc. to be vaccinated


    I definitely cant see that flying here (even if all employees could get vaccinated which most probably cant under current criteria here)

    Occupations for which vaccination is required (not Covid vac - flu vac and other vacs or serology proofs of immunity) - all employees have to do it, like it or not. No incentives, pay or otherwise - you do it or don't work

    Same with visitors to nursing homes - you have to have had current flu vaccine unless medically contraindicated (very rare) or under 6 months old

    No incentives, pay or otherwise - you do it or don't work/volunteer/visit

    Some businesses with salaried employees let them get the vax on company time. This business is all hourly-pay. Part of their representation is that this is close to equivalent to letting employees get the vax during work hours.

    In the US, even this has attracted lightning from the public. *Requiring* employees to be vaccinated is even more controversial. That may be shocking, or something people elsewhere reject . . . but inducements play slightly better here than mandates. I don't love everything about our culture, but it is what it is, and this business (like all others) is swimming in it.


    Ive been vaccinated on company time, on wages, as has my husband - that is not unusual when the vaccines are supplied on site

    Many companies cover the cost of the actual vaccines (flu vaccine) - either through a contract with an external provider or reimbursing receipts - but the vaccines are not compulsory unless relevant to the job

    But nowhere pays you extra wages if you are vaccinated - either it is a requirement of the job or it isnt - and it can only be a requirement if it is relevant to the job - eg health care, child care.
    A steelworks or burger place would not be able to enforce it.
    But a steelworks can enforce mandatory drug testing - because they operate heavy machinery and it is relevant to the job - that is the bottom line with anything mandatory.

    That's not what I was meaning to say. Yes, that has happened here, too: Hospital workers typically got vaccinated at their worksite, during working hours.

    It has also been the case here that some companies told salaried workers they could schedule a vaccination appointment (wherever they were getting the vaccination, like health department, pharmacy, mass vax event, etc.), then go to that appointment during working hours, without using sick time or vacation time or other types of leave during that time. In effect, they were being paid during their vaccination appointment. The local restaurant that gave their hourly employees $100 (net of regular withholdings) were intending to do the same kind of thing, let their employees get a vaccine during work time, offsite. They made it a generous flat amount rather than requiring people to clock in or otherwise report the actual amount of time during which they were getting vaccinated.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,689 Member Member Posts: 8,689 Member
    Psychgrrl wrote: »
    lorib642 wrote: »
    Just got 2nd shot at cvs and they gave me a 20% off coupon. They have given me coupon for flu shot before. I don't think it would be something that would draw anyone to get vaccinated but is a nice bonus.

    Not sure where you are, but there are lots of free or “small donation” flu shot clinics in the US. I didn’t realize people would need a 20% off coupon for a flu shot.

    If you don't have CVS in your area, you may not realize that their "generosity" in giving out coupons is the butt of jokes, mostly focused on the three- or four-foot long receipt that they hand you, most of which consists of coupons.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,689 Member Member Posts: 8,689 Member
    glassyo wrote: »
    Me at my first dose appt when they told me to go into an area where the nurses are for my 15 minute hostage situation: Any donuts or cookies?

    Just bottles of water at mine.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Member Posts: 6,599 Member Member Posts: 6,599 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Next up, they offered their employees $100 in pay (subject to the usual taxes/withholdings, so probably around $70 net) to be vaccinated, explicitly saying they would not *require* employees, patrons, etc. to be vaccinated


    I definitely cant see that flying here (even if all employees could get vaccinated which most probably cant under current criteria here)

    Occupations for which vaccination is required (not Covid vac - flu vac and other vacs or serology proofs of immunity) - all employees have to do it, like it or not. No incentives, pay or otherwise - you do it or don't work

    Same with visitors to nursing homes - you have to have had current flu vaccine unless medically contraindicated (very rare) or under 6 months old

    No incentives, pay or otherwise - you do it or don't work/volunteer/visit

    Some businesses with salaried employees let them get the vax on company time. This business is all hourly-pay. Part of their representation is that this is close to equivalent to letting employees get the vax during work hours.

    In the US, even this has attracted lightning from the public. *Requiring* employees to be vaccinated is even more controversial. That may be shocking, or something people elsewhere reject . . . but inducements play slightly better here than mandates. I don't love everything about our culture, but it is what it is, and this business (like all others) is swimming in it.


    Ive been vaccinated on company time, on wages, as has my husband - that is not unusual when the vaccines are supplied on site

    Many companies cover the cost of the actual vaccines (flu vaccine) - either through a contract with an external provider or reimbursing receipts - but the vaccines are not compulsory unless relevant to the job

    But nowhere pays you extra wages if you are vaccinated - either it is a requirement of the job or it isnt - and it can only be a requirement if it is relevant to the job - eg health care, child care.
    A steelworks or burger place would not be able to enforce it.
    But a steelworks can enforce mandatory drug testing - because they operate heavy machinery and it is relevant to the job - that is the bottom line with anything mandatory.

    That's not what I was meaning to say. Yes, that has happened here, too: Hospital workers typically got vaccinated at their worksite, during working hours.

    It has also been the case here that some companies told salaried workers they could schedule a vaccination appointment (wherever they were getting the vaccination, like health department, pharmacy, mass vax event, etc.), then go to that appointment during working hours, without using sick time or vacation time or other types of leave during that time. In effect, they were being paid during their vaccination appointment. The local restaurant that gave their hourly employees $100 (net of regular withholdings) were intending to do the same kind of thing, let their employees get a vaccine during work time, offsite. They made it a generous flat amount rather than requiring people to clock in or otherwise report the actual amount of time during which they were getting vaccinated.


    I guess it depends on how they word it then - if it is more like a reimbursement of your time/ travel costs etc and we are rounding that generously to flat pay of $100 per person rather than requiring you to log the exact time or provide petrol or taxi receipts - then, yes would be reasonable and acceptable here too.

    If they word it as bribing employees to be vaccinated, then no.

    I realise that may seem semantics and equates to the same thing really - but how you present something often does affect people's response to it or it's public acceptability.
  • glassyoglassyo Member Posts: 5,210 Member Member Posts: 5,210 Member
    glassyo wrote: »
    Me at my first dose appt when they told me to go into an area where the nurses are for my 15 minute hostage situation: Any donuts or cookies?

    Just bottles of water at mine.

    I'm not even sure we had that but not a big deal. I was thinking of this thread when I was at the appt so said it jokingly.
  • yirarayirara Member Posts: 6,229 Member Member Posts: 6,229 Member
    None of this here. But I'm currently trying to find work. There are lots of interesting consultancy jobs around, often just for 6-12 months. But my application gets turned down because I'm not vaccinated yet. Why is that an issue? Being in Europe the market for my profession is small. I'd need to look abroad. No company in another country would hire a consultant urgently who first has to isolate in a hotel for 10-14 days, or would not be able to get into that country at all.

    According to government information it will take at least 2 more months before I get the first vaccination dose. It's a total unorganized mess here. But with a bit of luck I'll be able to jump the queue: I've taken on a side gig as vaccination giver. And those people get the leftovers at the end of the day. But apart from that i won't be sitting at home browsing job boards every day, and will be able to get out and talk to people. Win win.
  • Busy911Busy911 Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member
    It's disgusting. Celebrities and companies need to stay in their lane.
  • Busy911Busy911 Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member
    Busy911 wrote: »
    It's disgusting. Celebrities and companies need to stay in their lane.

    Krispy Kreme is literally providing donuts. Nothing could be more in their lane than providing donuts to people.

    Disagree. Vax has nothing to do with their lane unless they're injecting donuts with jelly or chocolate.
  • glassyoglassyo Member Posts: 5,210 Member Member Posts: 5,210 Member
    Busy911 wrote: »
    Busy911 wrote: »
    It's disgusting. Celebrities and companies need to stay in their lane.

    Krispy Kreme is literally providing donuts. Nothing could be more in their lane than providing donuts to people.

    Disagree. Vax has nothing to do with their lane unless they're injecting donuts with jelly or chocolate.

    Uh, ever heard of a jelly donut?
  • Busy911Busy911 Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member
    glassyo wrote: »
    Busy911 wrote: »
    Busy911 wrote: »
    It's disgusting. Celebrities and companies need to stay in their lane.

    Krispy Kreme is literally providing donuts. Nothing could be more in their lane than providing donuts to people.

    Disagree. Vax has nothing to do with their lane unless they're injecting donuts with jelly or chocolate.

    Uh, ever heard of a jelly donut?

    er?
  • Busy911Busy911 Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member
    Busy911 wrote: »
    Busy911 wrote: »
    It's disgusting. Celebrities and companies need to stay in their lane.

    Krispy Kreme is literally providing donuts. Nothing could be more in their lane than providing donuts to people.

    Disagree. Vax has nothing to do with their lane unless they're injecting donuts with jelly or chocolate.

    They're part of the overall society that has been ravaged by this disease. No reasonable person could be surprised that they consider helping reduce COVID rates to be in their interest.

    Not sure PR stunts qualify someone as 'reasonable' or 'helping'.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 25,457 Member Member, Premium Posts: 25,457 Member
    Busy911 wrote: »
    Busy911 wrote: »
    Busy911 wrote: »
    It's disgusting. Celebrities and companies need to stay in their lane.

    Krispy Kreme is literally providing donuts. Nothing could be more in their lane than providing donuts to people.

    Disagree. Vax has nothing to do with their lane unless they're injecting donuts with jelly or chocolate.

    They're part of the overall society that has been ravaged by this disease. No reasonable person could be surprised that they consider helping reduce COVID rates to be in their interest.

    Not sure PR stunts qualify someone as 'reasonable' or 'helping'.

    So if it's just a stunt that won't do anything either way, what's the problem? What disgusts you about it?
  • Busy911Busy911 Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18 Member
    Busy911 wrote: »
    Busy911 wrote: »
    Busy911 wrote: »
    It's disgusting. Celebrities and companies need to stay in their lane.

    Krispy Kreme is literally providing donuts. Nothing could be more in their lane than providing donuts to people.

    Disagree. Vax has nothing to do with their lane unless they're injecting donuts with jelly or chocolate.

    They're part of the overall society that has been ravaged by this disease. No reasonable person could be surprised that they consider helping reduce COVID rates to be in their interest.

    Not sure PR stunts qualify someone as 'reasonable' or 'helping'.

    So if it's just a stunt that won't do anything either way, what's the problem? What disgusts you about it?

    The fact that it is a virtue signaling stunt disgusts me and the fact, as I've already stated, that I believe celebrities, corporations etc need to sell their brand/products and not their ideas which seeks to persuade and/or exploit public opinion on social matters for profit.
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