Cheese Admiration and Celebration

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Replies

  • MelodiousMermaid
    MelodiousMermaid Posts: 380 Member
    xgomgs4ntoib.jpg
    Any recommendations on how to enjoy this best? Open to snacks/meals... wherever it would best be experienced.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,998 Member
    xgomgs4ntoib.jpg
    Any recommendations on how to enjoy this best? Open to snacks/meals... wherever it would best be experienced.

    With really special cheeses - I'd guess this will be one - I just like to eat it plain, in relatively small pieces, savoring every bit. This may be a minority approach, though!

    Report back on what you think of it, if you're willing?
  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,940 Member
    edited August 2022
    So…success with the Skyr…

    mhtf41edjc55.jpeg - showing formed curds…

    sak0bgd845fr.jpeg - dumped into bowl after straining the whey off and before whisking.

    But abject failure with the Gjetost. 😂 I followed the plan to the letter but ended up with an inedible hard caramel ‘thing’ that made me think someone had decided vinegar was better than vanilla when making toffee! The bin was the only solution. I did mean to take a photo of the mess but didn’t! 😂
  • claireychn074
    claireychn074 Posts: 1,328 Member
    I’m just learning how to make my own sourdough bread (experienced bread maker but hadn’t made sourdough before). First loaf was an absolute cracker, lovely crust and a spongy tasty crumb. Cheese fans - what would you recommend as an ideal partner for such a delicious loaf? I’m in the UK for reference.
  • MelodiousMermaid
    MelodiousMermaid Posts: 380 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    xgomgs4ntoib.jpg
    Any recommendations on how to enjoy this best? Open to snacks/meals... wherever it would best be experienced.

    With really special cheeses - I'd guess this will be one - I just like to eat it plain, in relatively small pieces, savoring every bit. This may be a minority approach, though!

    Report back on what you think of it, if you're willing?

    So I went to try this on its own for snack yesterday... but found that it's overripe. No mold, but softer than cream cheese (gooey/sauce-ish when trying to cut into it). So I revamped the plan and heated it up on broccoli for supper. It turned out pretty decent, but it leaves me wondering what the flavor of a properly ripe wedge would be. Fairly disappointing regarding the snack, but at least it was salvageable.

    Will be having a chat with the cheese island people about selling overripe cheese. I don't think it serves their purpose in trying to get people to buy more and varied kinds of cheeses. Or perhaps it might in my case, as it piqued my curiosity, but I'm somewhat annoyed to have paid money for the cheese.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 9,876 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    xgomgs4ntoib.jpg
    Any recommendations on how to enjoy this best? Open to snacks/meals... wherever it would best be experienced.

    With really special cheeses - I'd guess this will be one - I just like to eat it plain, in relatively small pieces, savoring every bit. This may be a minority approach, though!

    Report back on what you think of it, if you're willing?

    So I went to try this on its own for snack yesterday... but found that it's overripe. No mold, but softer than cream cheese (gooey/sauce-ish when trying to cut into it). So I revamped the plan and heated it up on broccoli for supper. It turned out pretty decent, but it leaves me wondering what the flavor of a properly ripe wedge would be. Fairly disappointing regarding the snack, but at least it was salvageable.

    Will be having a chat with the cheese island people about selling overripe cheese. I don't think it serves their purpose in trying to get people to buy more and varied kinds of cheeses. Or perhaps it might in my case, as it piqued my curiosity, but I'm somewhat annoyed to have paid money for the cheese.

    Could it have been a triple brie?
  • MelodiousMermaid
    MelodiousMermaid Posts: 380 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    xgomgs4ntoib.jpg
    Any recommendations on how to enjoy this best? Open to snacks/meals... wherever it would best be experienced.

    With really special cheeses - I'd guess this will be one - I just like to eat it plain, in relatively small pieces, savoring every bit. This may be a minority approach, though!

    Report back on what you think of it, if you're willing?

    So I went to try this on its own for snack yesterday... but found that it's overripe. No mold, but softer than cream cheese (gooey/sauce-ish when trying to cut into it). So I revamped the plan and heated it up on broccoli for supper. It turned out pretty decent, but it leaves me wondering what the flavor of a properly ripe wedge would be. Fairly disappointing regarding the snack, but at least it was salvageable.

    Will be having a chat with the cheese island people about selling overripe cheese. I don't think it serves their purpose in trying to get people to buy more and varied kinds of cheeses. Or perhaps it might in my case, as it piqued my curiosity, but I'm somewhat annoyed to have paid money for the cheese.

    Could it have been a triple brie?

    I am a relative novice to the greater world of cheese, so I looked up more info on triple brie and found this:
    The interior paste of the Triple Creme is dense, soft and smooth with occasional small holes. It is pale butter yellow in color. Flavors are rich, buttery and taste slightly of mushrooms and almonds.

    If this is correct, then it still would have been overripe, as there were no noticeable small holes, and the consistency was... well, the best comparison I can think of is nacho cheese sauce once you cut through the rind. I'm guessing that's not what it should be like? It did have a buttery flavor though and the truffle flavor was an undertone in my opinion, so maybe the flavor profile wasn't markedly altered regardless of the ripeness.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 9,876 Member
    edited August 2022
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    xgomgs4ntoib.jpg
    Any recommendations on how to enjoy this best? Open to snacks/meals... wherever it would best be experienced.

    With really special cheeses - I'd guess this will be one - I just like to eat it plain, in relatively small pieces, savoring every bit. This may be a minority approach, though!

    Report back on what you think of it, if you're willing?

    So I went to try this on its own for snack yesterday... but found that it's overripe. No mold, but softer than cream cheese (gooey/sauce-ish when trying to cut into it). So I revamped the plan and heated it up on broccoli for supper. It turned out pretty decent, but it leaves me wondering what the flavor of a properly ripe wedge would be. Fairly disappointing regarding the snack, but at least it was salvageable.

    Will be having a chat with the cheese island people about selling overripe cheese. I don't think it serves their purpose in trying to get people to buy more and varied kinds of cheeses. Or perhaps it might in my case, as it piqued my curiosity, but I'm somewhat annoyed to have paid money for the cheese.

    Could it have been a triple brie?

    I am a relative novice to the greater world of cheese, so I looked up more info on triple brie and found this:
    The interior paste of the Triple Creme is dense, soft and smooth with occasional small holes. It is pale butter yellow in color. Flavors are rich, buttery and taste slightly of mushrooms and almonds.

    If this is correct, then it still would have been overripe, as there were no noticeable small holes, and the consistency was... well, the best comparison I can think of is nacho cheese sauce once you cut through the rind. I'm guessing that's not what it should be like? It did have a buttery flavor though and the truffle flavor was an undertone in my opinion, so maybe the flavor profile wasn't markedly altered regardless of the ripeness.

    Yeah, hard to say. Triple is dense but it doesn't cut really like a normal brie and it really needs to be spread onto something and of course I'm talking when the cheese gets up to room temp where cheese should be consumed for the most part. When a triple is very ripe it can just seem to collapse and be more of a soft cream cheese. Generally when truffle is added, and I mean real truffle you'll find them in better cheeses and triple is the best brie, pretty much but a double brie is as possible. I just did a search and if the fromager d'Affinois is made in France then it's a double brie.
  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,940 Member
    I’m just learning how to make my own sourdough bread (experienced bread maker but hadn’t made sourdough before). First loaf was an absolute cracker, lovely crust and a spongy tasty crumb. Cheese fans - what would you recommend as an ideal partner for such a delicious loaf? I’m in the UK for reference.

    Not at all good for the calories, but I don’t think you can do your bread justice without eating it with a Baked Camembert! With a handful of toasted walnuts and maybe a sharp jelly, redcurrant being the traditional although I like my homemade grape and chilli jelly.

    President brand is my favourite - melts the most reliably (180°C for 18 minutes). In my experience Morrisons own Camembert just never melts properly although it tastes good.

  • claireychn074
    claireychn074 Posts: 1,328 Member
    I’m just learning how to make my own sourdough bread (experienced bread maker but hadn’t made sourdough before). First loaf was an absolute cracker, lovely crust and a spongy tasty crumb. Cheese fans - what would you recommend as an ideal partner for such a delicious loaf? I’m in the UK for reference.

    Not at all good for the calories, but I don’t think you can do your bread justice without eating it with a Baked Camembert! With a handful of toasted walnuts and maybe a sharp jelly, redcurrant being the traditional although I like my homemade grape and chilli jelly.

    President brand is my favourite - melts the most reliably (180°C for 18 minutes). In my experience Morrisons own Camembert just never melts properly although it tastes good.
    Oooh now that is inspired. Oh guess what I’m doing this weekend!

  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,998 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    xgomgs4ntoib.jpg
    Any recommendations on how to enjoy this best? Open to snacks/meals... wherever it would best be experienced.

    With really special cheeses - I'd guess this will be one - I just like to eat it plain, in relatively small pieces, savoring every bit. This may be a minority approach, though!

    Report back on what you think of it, if you're willing?

    So I went to try this on its own for snack yesterday... but found that it's overripe. No mold, but softer than cream cheese (gooey/sauce-ish when trying to cut into it). So I revamped the plan and heated it up on broccoli for supper. It turned out pretty decent, but it leaves me wondering what the flavor of a properly ripe wedge would be. Fairly disappointing regarding the snack, but at least it was salvageable.

    Will be having a chat with the cheese island people about selling overripe cheese. I don't think it serves their purpose in trying to get people to buy more and varied kinds of cheeses. Or perhaps it might in my case, as it piqued my curiosity, but I'm somewhat annoyed to have paid money for the cheese.

    I won't argue with your conclusion, because you tasted the cheese and I didn't, but one of the most transportational cheeses I've had was a locally-made farmstead Camembert style (so sort of Brie adjacent) that was ripe to the point of flowing out of its rind when cut. The flavor was utterly amazing. I can't describe it, but rich and luxurious.

    I admit, that was hard to eat in slices (🤣), but a spoon would've worked. In practice, I spread it on the most neutral-tasting crackers or bread I had in the house at the time.

    There's a tendency of some cheeses in this general style to develop a slight ammonia tinge to the aroma that's off-putting (wasn't true of the cheese described in my first paragraph, but of a later one). The cheesemaker suggested to me that letting such a cheese sit in the air at room temperature would allow that to dissipate, not interfere with the flavor. Was he giving me a sales job? Dunno. Haven't had an example to try this with, since.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,998 Member
    I’m just learning how to make my own sourdough bread (experienced bread maker but hadn’t made sourdough before). First loaf was an absolute cracker, lovely crust and a spongy tasty crumb. Cheese fans - what would you recommend as an ideal partner for such a delicious loaf? I’m in the UK for reference.

    I agree with the recommendation of baked Camembert or Brie - that would be delicious. I like the sharp jam idea, too, but I'd be tempted to roast a whole head of fresh garlic, too, and have some contrasts with different bites.

    More pedestrian, y'all in the UK have a rep for the best Cheddar, and some excellent Stiltons with add-ins. (I especially like the mango ginger, but cranberry and blueberry are also good.)

    I also like a good herb chevre on good bread. Here in the US, Cypress Grove sells a dill one called Psychedillic that's very good.
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,145 Member
    String cheese.

    Yep. String cheese.

    It's not that special, really. But you can toss it in a dry box and take it on a river trip so it doesn't take cooler space, and you can pull one out whenever you need a snack. I haven't bought it in a while, but I took some on this last trip. Was a good way to add fat and a little protein for a lunch substitute. We didn't really stop for lunch; was easy to open a box and grab a couple hunks o' cheese.

    Sad sad sad were the two people on the trip that can't eat cheese. I feel so bad for them.
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 6,106 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    String cheese.

    Yep. String cheese.

    Side note, but if it weren't for American TV shows and reading on MFP, I never would have known string cheese exists. I don't think it's even sold here!
  • MelodiousMermaid
    MelodiousMermaid Posts: 380 Member
    So I picked up some camembert to try between the recent discussion and the fact that it was on sale.

    I unfortunately can't have nuts, so I need to try something else... would sourdough and camembert under the broiler until melty be an option? With a bit of butter and garlic and Italian seasoning? Or would it be best paired with something sweet? I do have a strawberry rhubarb jelly that's been calling my name in the pantry... trying to avoid going out for additional groceries, but will make a trip if there's a recommendation that's going to be far better than either of the ideas I had.
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 6,106 Member
    edited August 2022
    So I picked up some camembert to try between the recent discussion and the fact that it was on sale.

    I unfortunately can't have nuts, so I need to try something else... would sourdough and camembert under the broiler until melty be an option? With a bit of butter and garlic and Italian seasoning? Or would it be best paired with something sweet? I do have a strawberry rhubarb jelly that's been calling my name in the pantry... trying to avoid going out for additional groceries, but will make a trip if there's a recommendation that's going to be far better than either of the ideas I had.

    I love the combinations camembert and honey or camembert and what we call 'stroop' here (a sort of syrup or treacle made from fruit). So the jelly definitely sounds like something I'd try 🙂
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,998 Member
    So I picked up some camembert to try between the recent discussion and the fact that it was on sale.

    I unfortunately can't have nuts, so I need to try something else... would sourdough and camembert under the broiler until melty be an option? With a bit of butter and garlic and Italian seasoning? Or would it be best paired with something sweet? I do have a strawberry rhubarb jelly that's been calling my name in the pantry... trying to avoid going out for additional groceries, but will make a trip if there's a recommendation that's going to be far better than either of the ideas I had.

    The nuts are optional.

    Why not just try some things? You don't have to devote a slice to all one thing, if you want to eat it on the sourdough. Maybe quarter the slice, try a different thing on 3 of the quarters, plain on one? Experiments are fun!

    Melted under the broiler is fine, or even just brought to room temp and sliced (if it's sliceable, vs. spreadable).

    It would be a grocery store trip, but if it's a whole but small camembert round (vs. a wedge/chunk that's cut), wrapping it in puff pastry sheets and baked is fabulous. (Puff pastry is widely available here in the US in grocer store freezer cases - follow package directions for thawing, lots of instructions online about the baking part with cheese inside.)

    Personally, I don't think the butter is needful: The cheese itself is pretty rich.
  • MelodiousMermaid
    MelodiousMermaid Posts: 380 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    So I picked up some camembert to try between the recent discussion and the fact that it was on sale.

    I unfortunately can't have nuts, so I need to try something else... would sourdough and camembert under the broiler until melty be an option? With a bit of butter and garlic and Italian seasoning? Or would it be best paired with something sweet? I do have a strawberry rhubarb jelly that's been calling my name in the pantry... trying to avoid going out for additional groceries, but will make a trip if there's a recommendation that's going to be far better than either of the ideas I had.

    The nuts are optional.

    Why not just try some things? You don't have to devote a slice to all one thing, if you want to eat it on the sourdough. Maybe quarter the slice, try a different thing on 3 of the quarters, plain on one? Experiments are fun!

    Melted under the broiler is fine, or even just brought to room temp and sliced (if it's sliceable, vs. spreadable).

    It would be a grocery store trip, but if it's a whole but small camembert round (vs. a wedge/chunk that's cut), wrapping it in puff pastry sheets and baked is fabulous. (Puff pastry is widely available here in the US in grocer store freezer cases - follow package directions for thawing, lots of instructions online about the baking part with cheese inside.)

    Personally, I don't think the butter is needful: The cheese itself is pretty rich.

    Ha, there I went making it more complicated than need be. Splitting the bread... so simple, and a perfect solution!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,998 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    So I picked up some camembert to try between the recent discussion and the fact that it was on sale.

    I unfortunately can't have nuts, so I need to try something else... would sourdough and camembert under the broiler until melty be an option? With a bit of butter and garlic and Italian seasoning? Or would it be best paired with something sweet? I do have a strawberry rhubarb jelly that's been calling my name in the pantry... trying to avoid going out for additional groceries, but will make a trip if there's a recommendation that's going to be far better than either of the ideas I had.

    The nuts are optional.

    Why not just try some things? You don't have to devote a slice to all one thing, if you want to eat it on the sourdough. Maybe quarter the slice, try a different thing on 3 of the quarters, plain on one? Experiments are fun!

    Melted under the broiler is fine, or even just brought to room temp and sliced (if it's sliceable, vs. spreadable).

    It would be a grocery store trip, but if it's a whole but small camembert round (vs. a wedge/chunk that's cut), wrapping it in puff pastry sheets and baked is fabulous. (Puff pastry is widely available here in the US in grocer store freezer cases - follow package directions for thawing, lots of instructions online about the baking part with cheese inside.)

    Personally, I don't think the butter is needful: The cheese itself is pretty rich.

    Ha, there I went making it more complicated than need be. Splitting the bread... so simple, and a perfect solution!

    If you feel like it, maybe let us know what you think, after you try it? It would be fun to hear what you decide is tasty!
  • MelodiousMermaid
    MelodiousMermaid Posts: 380 Member
    9w653xmbcbov.jpg

    Yum. What a snack! Could have totally continued noshing on the bread, cheese, and toppings combos.

    So I tried it both ways, and both were a success, especially compared to eating it alone at room temp, which I did try too. Did not really care for it alone.

    I selected my slice of bread, measured out my allotment of cheese, and proceeded to divide the cheese so the bread was covered. I then divided it in two. First I toasted the bread with cheese in the toaster oven, to the medium darkness setting, then I switched it to broiler mode and left it alone for a few minutes. Probably could've gotten a bit more color in the cheese before taking it out, but a piece of it was starting to drip off, so that was that. After removing from the toaster, I shook on some granulated garlic and Italian seasoning for the first half-slice, then proceeded to put a serving of strawberry rhubarb fruit spread on the other half-slice.

    My favorite was... both! The flavor combinations were both pretty stellar, in my opinion. Yum!