Reaching protein goal

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I am to consume 143 gr of protein daily on a -2000 calorie budget. I’m eating eggs, yogurt, chicken breast, and beans. But I’m lucky if I make it to 120 gr, which is rare. Any suggestions?

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  • Retroguy2000
    Retroguy2000 Posts: 1,531 Member
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    a) Are you sure you need 143g? 0.7g per pound is a solid high target if you're lifting.

    b) Protein powder. 1 scoop, 24g or 25g protein, 120-130 calories.
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 6,194 Member
    edited March 18
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    What yogurt are you eating? A lot of yogurts don't have huge amounts of protein. If you are not eating (low fat) Greek yogurt or skyr, you might consider those as alternatives with a higher protein content.

    I also like chickpeas, shrimp and squid myself.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 32,496 Member
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    a) Are you sure you need 143g? 0.7g per pound is a solid high target if you're lifting.

    b) Protein powder. 1 scoop, 24g or 25g protein, 120-130 calories.

    If substantially overweight, you can use a healthy goal weight to estimate protein needs.

    And if you haven't seen it already, check out the thread "Carbs and Fats are cheap. Here's a Guide to getting your PROTEIN's worth. Fiber also..." in the "Most Helpful Posts" section of this "Food and Nutrition" section of the MFP Community.

    My other tip would be to think not just about one main protein source per meal, but also about choosing sides, snacks, etc. that have at least a bit of protein. There are breads, grains, veggies, even fruits with more protein than others. That thread mentioned above can help you identify some. Those small bits through the day add up.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 9,978 Member
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    Striploin for the win.
  • snowboardandasuitcase
    snowboardandasuitcase Posts: 217 Member
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    I stir protein powder into my high protein greek yogurt. Works a treat. Also check different brands of foods you buy and pick the best macros. I've changed brands on a lot of staples for this reason.
    Lentils are a decent low cal protein option with a mild flavour to add into almost anything for an extra boost.
  • nossmf
    nossmf Posts: 9,407 Member
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    How big of servings are you having? One 8oz chicken breast is good for 72g protein by itself, more than halfway to your stated goal, and for only 360 calories. If you only eat 3oz at a time, sure, it adds up to less, but also less calories for more flexibility, so...
  • LauraDover2024
    LauraDover2024 Posts: 1 Member
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    What about tuna, low fat cottage cheese, protein powder?
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 7,638 Member
    edited March 21
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    I have no issues incorporating protein, and I eat even more than you.

    Get creative. I add cottage cheese to baked goods, substitute liquid whey (drained from homemade yogurt and skyr) for water in baked goods and breads.

    I keep quantities of cooked and chopped (usually grilled or smoked) pork loin, lean steak, or chicken breast on hand to put in salads or wraps. I use low cal Lewis or Joesph’s breads wraps or pitas. They have some inherent protein but are low cal, too, which frees up calories for (yep!) more protein.

    Snacks are protein bars, cottage cheese with fruit, homemade low cal high protein ice creams, or this week, we’ve been enjoying a high protein low cal labneh cheesecake.

    Get creative. Put a serving of cottage cheese in your smoothie. Extra skim milk in your coffee. Beef jerky is a high protein treat. Make a hot chocolate with a bottle of CorePower. Add some plain protein powder to pancakes. Roasted edamame on your stir fry instead of Chinese noodles. Wrap a string cheese in prosciutto. Add peanut butter powder to pancakes, smoothies. Lately, I mix PBP with sugar free chocolate syrup and make a pretty creditable Nutella substitute for a fraction of the calories.

    Even if it’s only 3-4 grams, they add up in a hurry.

    Protein is easy to find. If anything, many days I find myself reeling it in.

    Remember those homework assignments to use your vocabulary words and the crazy sentences you’d make up? Protein is the same way. Make up some fun, painless, delicious ways to get it.
  • dejonny
    dejonny Posts: 17 Member
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    100g is enough tbh.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,981 Member
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    klstotts4 wrote: »
    I am to consume 143 gr of protein daily on a -2000 calorie budget. I’m eating eggs, yogurt, chicken breast, and beans. But I’m lucky if I make it to 120 gr, which is rare. Any suggestions?

    Try doubling checking your goal at this reputable protein calculator:
    https://examine.com/nutrition/protein-intake-calculator/

    143 g * 4 cal per gram / 2000 calories = 28.6% which is not crazy high but can indeed be a challenge. I like 20% for my goals.

    Good suggestions above - larger servings of chicken, try fish, check yogurt brands, get boosts throughout the day - I like cottage cheese for this.
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 9,978 Member
    edited March 21
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    dejonny wrote: »
    100g is enough tbh.

    Yeah, it might be, or maybe not. Protein isn't just some nomenclature to describe a macronutrient and really doesn't offer any nuance as far as the amino acid content which is what we actually need in proprietary combinations for every organ and cell in our body for turnover and in particular the amino acid leucine requirements and timing for muscle protein synthesis, basically just to maintain or grow muscle needs to be a specific amount and spread out over our anabolic feeding time in I think at least 3 meals, so when some says we need X amount of protein, it's better to consume too much then not consuming enough. 0.8g/kg/day is in my opinion at least 1/2 of what a normal human being needs, so double that and if a person is young and active, plays a lot of sports you can add some more.

    The protein quality and how well the body absorbs it is never talked about because there is a fairly big difference between plant and animal protein and authorities have been plant centric from the inception of the food pyramid but the RDI was based on animal protein, so there is that. The right amount of the right AA's are crucial if we want to have decent muscle as we age because as it is people are losing muscle after 40 to where sarcopenia has crept in and by the time a person hits 65-70 it's basically too late to reverse that and the quick mortality increases from a fall is extremely real, which is preventable but I suspect we won't be hearing about AA's for health and just continue to hear about protein in general and don't suspect the 0.8g/kg/day will change anytime soon, and a really good reason to do your own research and take your health in your own hands to make better informed decisions.