I'm running a marathon...

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Replies

  • FeebRyan
    FeebRyan Posts: 738 Member
    Well I'm exploring other avenues as well as here and most of those say that if you are in fairly good shape, you need to train for 16 weeks before a marathon. So say I do one in the later part of next year (which is fine, it doesn't have to be April, it depends which race I do/get into/find etc) I will need to get myself fit 16 weeks before the marathon and then do an intensive course, that is not impossible, lots of people run marathons who do not train for 3 years like is being suggested here.

    Its not that I am not able to take advice, it is just vastly contradicted by the information given on many other sources, like for example the London Marathon page which gives a basic training guide for 2015.

    As I said, worst comes to worse I will walk for half of it.

    I just went out for my first run, am knackered and ran practically no distance at all... I have a lot of work to do!

    My post saying "coach to marathon in 17 weeks" was in jest, I know you didn't mean that, so sorry that tone can't come across on message boards, that's unfortunate. I was saying it doesn't seem like you're taking the base needed before training starts is being taken seriously, from posts of yours like this. You just say you need to be fit (or in fairly good shape) before starting a 16 week training plan. I'm sorry if you meant "running fitness", or "have a good running base", I didn't read between the lines on that. My fault. I was trying my best to give you the advice you were seeking. So sorry if things got confused, never my intention!

    I really have no interest in taking advice from someone who twists my words like you have.

    Thanks anyway.
  • FeebRyan
    FeebRyan Posts: 738 Member
    From the London Marathon site

    It’s also important to withdraw from the race if you’re not fully prepared. You should have a good indication of your fitness from your training, but as a benchmark, if you can’t comfortably run 15 miles a month before the race, you probably won’t be able to safely complete the Virgin Money London Marathon.

    You actually misread this quote from the London Marathon site. This is saying if you can't run 15 miles at one time a month before the race, then you won't be able to run 26.2 on race day. Not run 15 miles a month before starting training.

    I actually think it was misread as being able to run 15 miles in the whole month... As people were posting about having to have done 25-40 miles over the period of a month before starting marathon training.

    it was 25-35 miles in a week, not a month.

    No I didn't mis-read it, it just gives a very different view of what is needed to compete than what is being said here (3 years training etc)

    Lots of couch - marathon guides that go over the course of a year.

    Lots of support for people doing the same thing I am doing

    Lots of people heavier than me preparing to run/walk London 2015
  • Collier78
    Collier78 Posts: 811 Member
    OP...The runner's have given you some solid advice. MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE (that's a disclaimer right there!) I started with C25K, went directly to 10K Bridge training, then directly to Half Marathon training. My first half is this weekend. I started my training last May, so it has been just under a year to get myself ready for the half. However, winter was not kind here, and my training suffered. I would have been done with the half training and just maintaning training and distances, but I had to repeat some training due to longer breaks between runs than I would have liked. I understand exactly what you are saying. You want to do training for 9 months before you even start the 17 week marathon program. I'd say start with C25K and do what I did and see where you are in 9 months. If you have good base mileage by then, start the training program. If you don't, readjust and go from there.

    Only you know how far you can push yourself without risking an injury and that is what you have to keep in mind. Injuries equal sideline time and sideline time equals goals unmet. What you are doing for your friend is awesome! But if you can't do it at all because you get hurt, it doesn't benefit either one of you. Best of luck!
  • aswearingen22
    aswearingen22 Posts: 271 Member
    From the London Marathon site

    It’s also important to withdraw from the race if you’re not fully prepared. You should have a good indication of your fitness from your training, but as a benchmark, if you can’t comfortably run 15 miles a month before the race, you probably won’t be able to safely complete the Virgin Money London Marathon.

    You actually misread this quote from the London Marathon site. This is saying if you can't run 15 miles at one time a month before the race, then you won't be able to run 26.2 on race day. Not run 15 miles a month before starting training.

    I actually think it was misread as being able to run 15 miles in the whole month... As people were posting about having to have done 25-40 miles over the period of a month before starting marathon training.

    Yes, I think that's what the OP took it to mean, which was incorrect. The OP said this is a quote from the London site. What I understand it to mean is that you'll know from your marathon training if you're really ready for marathon race day if a month before the race, if you can run 15 miles, then you'll be ready for 26.2 on race day. 15 miles a month would be 3 miles a week roughly, and that doesn't make any sense for a race of any distance.
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,720 Member
    From the London Marathon site

    It’s also important to withdraw from the race if you’re not fully prepared. You should have a good indication of your fitness from your training, but as a benchmark, if you can’t comfortably run 15 miles a month before the race, you probably won’t be able to safely complete the Virgin Money London Marathon.

    You actually misread this quote from the London Marathon site. This is saying if you can't run 15 miles at one time a month before the race, then you won't be able to run 26.2 on race day. Not run 15 miles a month before starting training.

    I actually think it was misread as being able to run 15 miles in the whole month... As people were posting about having to have done 25-40 miles over the period of a month before starting marathon training.

    Yes, I think that's what the OP took it to mean, which was incorrect. The OP said this is a quote from the London site. What I understand it to mean is that you'll know from your marathon training if you're really ready for marathon race day if a month before the race, if you can run 15 miles, then you'll be ready for 26.2 on race day. 15 miles a month would be 3 miles a week roughly, and that doesn't make any sense for a race of any distance.

    I think it must have been me that was confused!
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,720 Member
    From the London Marathon site

    It’s also important to withdraw from the race if you’re not fully prepared. You should have a good indication of your fitness from your training, but as a benchmark, if you can’t comfortably run 15 miles a month before the race, you probably won’t be able to safely complete the Virgin Money London Marathon.

    You actually misread this quote from the London Marathon site. This is saying if you can't run 15 miles at one time a month before the race, then you won't be able to run 26.2 on race day. Not run 15 miles a month before starting training.

    I actually think it was misread as being able to run 15 miles in the whole month... As people were posting about having to have done 25-40 miles over the period of a month before starting marathon training.

    it was 25-35 miles in a week, not a month.

    No I didn't mis-read it, it just gives a very different view of what is needed to compete than what is being said here (3 years training etc)

    Lots of couch - marathon guides that go over the course of a year.

    Lots of support for people doing the same thing I am doing

    Lots of people heavier than me preparing to run/walk London 2015

    But no one is disputing any of this with you! People are just trying to share their experiences!
  • aswearingen22
    aswearingen22 Posts: 271 Member
    I really have no interest in taking advice from someone who twists my words like you have.

    Thanks anyway.
    All I can say is good luck then! I wish you the best and hope it all goes well for you!:)
  • FeebRyan
    FeebRyan Posts: 738 Member
    OP...The runner's have given you some solid advice. MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE (that's a disclaimer right there!) I started with C25K, went directly to 10K Bridge training, then directly to Half Marathon training. My first half is this weekend. I started my training last May, so it has been just under a year to get myself ready for the half. However, winter was not kind here, and my training suffered. I would have been done with the half training and just maintaning training and distances, but I had to repeat some training due to longer breaks between runs than I would have liked. I understand exactly what you are saying. You want to do training for 9 months before you even start the 17 week marathon program. I'd say start with C25K and do what I did and see where you are in 9 months. If you have good base mileage by then, start the training program. If you don't, readjust and go from there.

    Only you know how far you can push yourself without risking an injury and that is what you have to keep in mind. Injuries equal sideline time and sideline time equals goals unmet. What you are doing for your friend is awesome! But if you can't do it at all because you get hurt, it doesn't benefit either one of you. Best of luck!

    Thanks, obviously I will do my best not to get injured! I think we are going to go for the Bournemouth Marathon 2015 which is October, so I will probably do the 10k there this October and that will mark a year until I do the full.

    walking for some of it is fine, I have good friends who are runners who will be able to help me out with that and as the training suggests 19 mile runs in the run up to the marathon, I will have a good idea of when I need to stop and have a walking break.
  • FeebRyan
    FeebRyan Posts: 738 Member

    But no one is disputing any of this with you! People are just trying to share their experiences!

    Nonsense, very few people have shared their experiences, they have just been negative about time frames and twisted my words to say things I haven't said.
  • CarsonRuns
    CarsonRuns Posts: 3,039 Member
    OP, there are really two questions that are being answered here and the response to each will be different. The questions are simple

    1. Can I be ready to complete a marathon in one year.

    2. Should I prepare to complete a marathon in one year.


    The answer to number one is "Yes", but with caveats, the largest of which is that you can complete your training without injury. Based on your current level of fitness and the amount of weight that you still want to lose, I think that there is a very real risk of your not being able to complete all of your training without some kind of injury. Does this mean that any injury, no matter how small is going to prevent you from completing the race? No, it just means that it is going to be even more miserable. And trust me, training for and completing a marathon in one year is going to be miserable. Since you are doing this as a way to help your friend, I understand that you are prepared to suffer this misery and you're to be commended for it.

    The answer to number two is "No". I, and many other experienced runners, think that you need to have a consistent base mileage before you even START a marathon training program. I always suggest that a runner consistently be logging 25+ mile weeks for a period of 12 to 18 months prior to starting a training program. Marathon training is hard on the body, mind and spirit.

    But, you didn't ask if you should do it. As a matter of fact, you didn't even ask if you could do it. You just said you were. This takes me back to my original post. Since you have made up your mind that you are going to do this, I STRONGLY suggest that you use the Galloway program. It is going to give you the highest chance for success in you quest.
  • aswearingen22
    aswearingen22 Posts: 271 Member
    I'm almost afraid to post, as it seems you really only want encouragement to do it, and aren't really listening to the advice of experienced runners that are worried for you. Carson has given you fantastic advice, go back and reread every one of his posts. Your REASON for doing it is the only thing that is keeping me from telling you not to even try it.

    Here's what it comes down to. Expert advice will be you've been running for a year, of 25-30 miles every single week, before you even start training for a marathon. So if you want to run an April 2015 marathon, a marathon training program is about 4.5 months long, so that would start in early December 2014, so you should have been running 25-30 miles a week since December 2013, which means you should have started the c25k program in early fall 2013 to get to that point in December. You are already about 7+ months behind where I suggest you should be. That doesn't mean you CAN'T do it, it means you are at a very, very high risk of injury. All the pounding of training takes a toll on your body and you need that base under your belt in order to strengthen your bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons, and joints. It is very likely you'll get hurt and not even make it to the starting line of the marathon. I know you don't want to hear that, but that's the truth. I ran casually for 11 years, and had a base of 25-30 miles a week for 2.5 years (and had run 8 half marathons) before I started training for my first marathon. Thankfully I made it through injury free, but it hurt. Those last 6.2 miles of the marathon is no joke. The training is no joke. I felt like all I did was eat, sleep, work, and run. No energy for much else. You give up a lot to train. I know you're willing to do that, I get the passion for WHY you're doing it. I think all the experienced long distance runners are just concerned you really aren't grasping the difficulty of what you're about to undertake and are underestimating it, as we've all done it, and we've all done it with far more running base than you have. And honestly, just planning to run when you can, and walk when you can, will probably be a more painful way to complete a marathon than those of us that run the entire thing, as that implies you aren't properly trained and it's even more time on your feet. You'll hear world class runners say their 2.5 hour marathon times seem easier to them than those of us that are on the course for 4.5 hours, as it's so much harder on your body. If you're talking 6-8 hours, that is a lot of time on your feet and will be so much harder than you might think.

    I will highly recommend Galloway as others have. It's a way to train that is dedicated to run/walk intervals and I think will be a great way for you to train from the beginning, being an inexperienced runner and as you build your mileage. It will also help by not being so hard on your body and help you to try to stay injury free. Also, the $ price of the shoes doesn't matter if you didn't go get fitted for them. And yes, you are asking for even more injury by not running in the shoes that are right for you. Again, experienced runners talking here.

    I think you're going to do it no matter what anyone says to the contrary, so good luck.

    Let me quote my very first post today. I think I knew better than to offer my advice (and yes, I did share my experience, right there in the second paragraph) as the OP didn't seem to want to hear those before me, but thought I'd share my advice as well and hope some of it helped her. Lesson learned perhaps!:)
  • aswearingen22
    aswearingen22 Posts: 271 Member
    OP, there are really two questions that are being answered here and the response to each will be different. The questions are simple

    1. Can I be ready to complete a marathon in one year.

    2. Should I prepare to complete a marathon in one year.


    The answer to number one is "Yes", but with caveats, the largest of which is that you can complete your training without injury. Based on your current level of fitness and the amount of weight that you still want to lose, I think that there is a very real risk of your not being able to complete all of your training without some kind of injury. Does this mean that any injury, no matter how small is going to prevent you from completing the race? No, it just means that it is going to be even more miserable. And trust me, training for and completing a marathon in one year is going to be miserable. Since you are doing this as a way to help your friend, I understand that you are prepared to suffer this misery and you're to be commended for it.

    The answer to number two is "No". I, and many other experienced runners, think that you need to have a consistent base mileage before you even START a marathon training program. I always suggest that a runner consistently be logging 25+ mile weeks for a period of 12 to 18 months prior to starting a training program. Marathon training is hard on the body, mind and spirit.

    But, you didn't ask if you should do it. As a matter of fact, you didn't even ask if you could do it. You just said you were. This takes me back to my original post. Since you have made up your mind that you are going to do this, I STRONGLY suggest that you use the Galloway program. It is going to give you the highest chance for success in you quest.
    +1, very very good advice here, as always Carson
  • rogerOb1
    rogerOb1 Posts: 318 Member
    From the London Marathon site

    It’s also important to withdraw from the race if you’re not fully prepared. You should have a good indication of your fitness from your training, but as a benchmark, if you can’t comfortably run 15 miles a month before the race, you probably won’t be able to safely complete the Virgin Money London Marathon.

    You actually misread this quote from the London Marathon site. This is saying if you can't run 15 miles at one time a month before the race, then you won't be able to run 26.2 on race day. Not run 15 miles a month before starting training.

    Oh the Irony!
    Haha, well played.
  • alpine1994
    alpine1994 Posts: 1,915 Member
    I agree with every response on here as well. I am definitely not a runner, but I started doing the Couch to 5k about a year ago (yes a YEAR!) to start running more and fall in love with it. And guess what? I strained my groin muscles so bad that I can no longer run. These people on here are trying to prevent that from happening to you. I am very fit and active, too. I know for a fact that if I didn't get hurt, I would not be ready for a marathon in a years time. You're setting yourself up for disappointment. Even if you ran the first few miles of the marathon and stopped to walk, you most likely wouldn't be able to maintain a 15 mile pace because you would be so beat.

    Definitely agree with this. I did the couch to 5K two years ago. I was in terrible shape and I was repeating weeks until I could actually complete each day's workout before moving on. I was in my third round of week 4 when I got a stress fracture in my foot. The doctor said zero running for 4 weeks which set me back almost to the beginning, and I was in college so I was hobbling to class for a month with crutches! I verrrrrrrry slowwwly got back into it, along with weight training and cross training (dancing and cycling) and lost an extra 30 lbs which made running a lot easier on my joints. Two years later, I am JUST now training for my very first 10K which is 5 weeks away. I am working hard but working smart. I will never forget how defeated I felt when I got that stress fracture and had to start over and lost all of that time.

    I really hope that you can get through this without any injuries and finish the marathon for your friend. You are a great person for doing this. :) My friend is currently raising money for diabetes and is running her first marathon this fall and I've had no trouble at all getting people to donate to her fund. It's a wonderful thing! Good luck OP!
  • FeebRyan
    FeebRyan Posts: 738 Member
    OP, there are really two questions that are being answered here and the response to each will be different. The questions are simple

    1. Can I be ready to complete a marathon in one year.

    2. Should I prepare to complete a marathon in one year.


    The answer to number one is "Yes", but with caveats, the largest of which is that you can complete your training without injury. Based on your current level of fitness and the amount of weight that you still want to lose, I think that there is a very real risk of your not being able to complete all of your training without some kind of injury. Does this mean that any injury, no matter how small is going to prevent you from completing the race? No, it just means that it is going to be even more miserable. And trust me, training for and completing a marathon in one year is going to be miserable. Since you are doing this as a way to help your friend, I understand that you are prepared to suffer this misery and you're to be commended for it.

    The answer to number two is "No". I, and many other experienced runners, think that you need to have a consistent base mileage before you even START a marathon training program. I always suggest that a runner consistently be logging 25+ mile weeks for a period of 12 to 18 months prior to starting a training program. Marathon training is hard on the body, mind and spirit.

    But, you didn't ask if you should do it. As a matter of fact, you didn't even ask if you could do it. You just said you were. This takes me back to my original post. Since you have made up your mind that you are going to do this, I STRONGLY suggest that you use the Galloway program. It is going to give you the highest chance for success in you quest.

    I think that is the real crux of it, rather than answering my question people have told me that I shouldn't be doing it. Well I have to. I have to help my friend and this is how I can do it, no its not ideal but neither is being stuck in a wheelchair for the rest of his life because of a bit of bloody ice on the road.

    We all work with what we have, some people run for charities because they feel they have to, they walk for some of the course and run for some of the course and they do it because of that reason, not because they are 100% ready, that is how I feel about it.

    I have until October 2015 to do this, that might not be optimum but it is what it is and it is what I am GOING to do, regardless of what negative spin some of the people on here choose to put on it
  • badbcatha05
    badbcatha05 Posts: 200 Member

    But no one is disputing any of this with you! People are just trying to share their experiences!

    Nonsense, very few people have shared their experiences, they have just been negative about time frames and twisted my words to say things I haven't said.

    C25K- May 2013-August 2013.
    4 mile trail race
    5k-10K Bridge- August 2013-October 2013
    10K race 1:02- October
    5K race 34:00- November
    November- 1 month break from running due to unpredictable and extremely long work hours
    January 2014- begin half marathon training- Goal race, May 25, 2014
    Mid January 2014-Mid February 2014- 3 week break from running thanks to shin splints... oops.
    Late February- resume training
    8K race- 56:00- March 2014
    3 mile race- 30:00- March 2014
    March-April- weekly mileage reduction due to on/off again shin problems. Long runs maintained on schedule. Switch off from non-stop run to Galloway run-walk-run for injury prevention.
    April 21, 2014- 1st 11 mile run ever. 2:07:57 (holy moly Meb won Boston in less than a minute longer than this!! INCREDIBLE!!)
    T minus 1 month, 4 days until race day.

    I post this to show you how MY year of training has progressed. Life happens. Injuries happen.

    Be careful.
  • urban_ninja
    urban_ninja Posts: 175 Member
    OP, I think it's commendable that you want to do this for your friend. I root for you and want you to accomplish this. I don't really participate in the runner forums, but I do lurk there and I love running. I've been running (sort of) for 2 years; nothing measured, but just something to break the monotony of my exercises. I averaged about 1-3 miles, but it was a run/walk (mostly walk).

    At the start of the year, I decided to try an official 5K with a goal of running straight and trained with an app (10K Runner). I'm a very determined individual so I dedicated 4 days a week. I still recall how difficult this was. I then moved on to a 10K training of 2-4 miles on weekdays and long runs of 6-7 on weekends. Most people thought this was aggressive, but I rather be overly fit than exhausted and struggling.

    Now it's been almost 5 months of dedicated training and I put in about 15-18 miles a week. Just a few days ago, I attempted an unofficial half-marathon distance and that was excruciating. I'm currently training for a Half in November. I don't perceive the advice of overtraining already given isn't negative, but merely concern for your well-being. At this point, I cannot even fathom of running a Full even by next year. That scares the crap out of me. I wasn't injured from that run, but exhausted after I hit the 13.1 mark and it was extremely difficult for me to even walk the rest of the way home which was less than a mile. I'm still a little sore from that run but I think I built up a good base. Even my arms were sore which was totally unexpected!

    So I don't think anyone is bashing you. It will definitely make sense as you progress. Again, I really do think what you're doing is great.

    One thing I'd advise that I haven't considered is the time when you train. I see you have kids and so do I. I spend 90 minutes per day of running during the week and almost 3 hours on my long runs on the weekends. When I decide to train for a full marathon, I'll need to allocate more time.

    I wish you the best in your endeavor and I look forward to the post of your accomplishment. :flowerforyou:

    EDIT: Just want to add running wasn't my only training exercise. I also did a resistance & cardio program (P90X3) and supplemented more weight training. I believe this was a huge help.
  • devilwhiterose
    devilwhiterose Posts: 1,157 Member
    Get good shoes. Seriously. GET.GOOD.SHOES. I'm a week since my half marathon and my feet are still killing me...

    Start slow. Walk, run, walk, run. You won't be a marathoner overnight.

    When I started running (last year) I had to stop several times. After a 3 miler (starting out...) I had to ice my shins and rest for a few weeks. Don't over-do it.

    I like Hal Higdon's plans. Check it out.
  • FeebRyan
    FeebRyan Posts: 738 Member
    I was going to build up to an hours run 3 times a week in the evening and then a 2 hour run on either Saturday or Sunday. Will take a bit of family time but we can work around it.
  • JTick
    JTick Posts: 2,131 Member
    I'll chime in here a little with my limited experience.

    Training for a long race is HARD. Not just physically, but mentally. OMG the mental aspect.

    I just recently ran my first half. I trained for about 5 months specifically for that race...I had already been running about a year though, but only 2-3 miles at a time.

    It was hard. So, SO hard. Just ask my MFP friend list...those poor, kind souls who had to listen to me.

    I dealt with injuries. I had to train through the winter. It was COLD, wet, and miserable. So miserable. There were times that I sat down in the middle of the road and cried, then got up and kept running because I was still two miles from my car. There were times that I had to stop and heave in the middle of the road because last night's meal wasn't sitting well. There were times that I just wanted to give up, but I didn't because for once in my life I wanted to be disciplined and finish what I started.

    I made every long run, even when I didn't want to. Rarely missed a weekday run either. Schedules, school, life, and work tried to get in my way. There were times I'd come home from a 12 hour day and do my runs under the moonlight.

    Also, 99% of people will tell you treadmills aren't a training option. They just don't give you the pounding and experience you need, and don't translate well to road running. Take that into consideration. My coldest run was below zero F...so cold I pulled my face mask up for a moment and it had iced over before I pulled it back down. Miserable.

    And this was just to complete a half. I made that first race my ***** too. I completed another just three weeks later, and am now looking at another one in two weeks. My experience is that it's not the race that kills you, it's the training.

    You need to take into consideration the cost too. Not just the shoes. The clothes (please don't run in cotton), the socks (freaking $15 a pair!), the anti-chafe butt creme (also known as Body Glide). There are a lot of things to consider that a first time runner doesn't know about.

    Are you prepared to spend 4+ hours going for a long run? Are you ready to bawl and scream and throw your hands up when you just feel like you can't go another step? Are you ready to spend the time icing aching joints and foam rolling? Are you ready for that next day after your long run when you HURT?

    I'd suggest you take a step back, and look at the advice you're being given. We're just trying to help.
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