Strong in weight room means nothing outside of it

167891012»

Replies

  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
    The deadlift, the barbell squat, the power clean, the overhead press--all functional lifts. You replicate these lifts in day to day life whether you realize it or not. Strong in the weight room means nothing outside of it? When I went down on my 400+ lb motorcycle and had to pick it back up again, what do you think that was? A deadlift. Ever see a mother pick up her toddler child? That explosive hip-jump to get the kid up to chest height in her arms? That's a power clean.

    Tell me a half decent climber who doesn't supplement with rows and deadlifts.

    You mean to tell me I've been a pro at power cleans all this time?!?! :noway: :bigsmile:

    I've been watching youtube videos and still can't get the form down with my 4-year-old. I wish somebody would write a book. I'm dead serious.

    Learning how to properly squat has completely saved my back during bath nights.
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
    So you're saying basketball is a real world application? LOL

    And as far as working out translating to real life I'd question if it does for many people. Like many I sit at a desk all day. I don't work out to be better at sitting at a desk. I work out to be better BECAUSE I sit at a desk.

    what if your build came crumbling down on you right now? I think some gym lifting would help to get out rather then being too weak to lift anything.

    LOL I get it. If disaster strikes it's helpful. I'm thinking more along the lines of daily life. I'm not saying it's not useful. I guess what I'm saying is our lifestyles generally don't demand we be really really strong. That's why most Americans are overweight. Our lifestyles point us to being sedentary. I work out to counteract that.

    Most Americans are overweight from eating habits not so much as less activity although that contributes. I am one of those Americans who had bed eating habits but tried to out run a poor diet. Literally out run and lift.

    I actually disagree. If you read the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, Almanzo Wilder's family over ate constantly but worked it off. They had literally no knowledge of nutrition and went for long periods without any green vegetables, etc.

    When you look at your micronutrient requirements, you'll notice that you can fulfill them with a fraction of your calorie allowance if you mindfully eat. We evolved in natural systems where there were seasonally abundant foods that did not provide balanced nutrition at all times.

    Also, if you look at studies that examine the effects of nutrition on various health indicators (like cholesterol, hypertension, etc) it's really murky. If you look at the effects of exercise, the results are usually pretty clear. Exercise is good.

    Eating a balanced diet and getting plenty of exercise is obviously the best way to go. But if I was to advise somebody on the single thing that would have maximum impact, I'd suggest starting with the 30 minutes of vigorous activity 5 days a week.

    ETA - Also, our bodies are designed to require a minimum amount of exercise to function correctly. http://www.katysays.com/diseases-of-captivity/
  • jraymond
    jraymond Posts: 25 Member
    Weight lifting (in the gym or elsewhere) is important for women. As we age, we do not necessarily suffer from a slowing metabolism (as many people think), according to advice from women's weight and health specialist, Dr. Pam Peake. What we suffer from and what really increases our tendency to gain weight is a rapidly decreasing amount of muscle. Since lean muscle burns calories and fat does not really burn any calories, you can increase your "metabolism" or your burn throughout the day, by increasing your lean muscle. I'm sure the same principle holds for men, although women lose muscle mass at 3x the rate of men, as we age--according to Dr. Peake.
  • yopeeps025
    yopeeps025 Posts: 8,680 Member
    So you're saying basketball is a real world application? LOL

    And as far as working out translating to real life I'd question if it does for many people. Like many I sit at a desk all day. I don't work out to be better at sitting at a desk. I work out to be better BECAUSE I sit at a desk.

    what if your build came crumbling down on you right now? I think some gym lifting would help to get out rather then being too weak to lift anything.

    LOL I get it. If disaster strikes it's helpful. I'm thinking more along the lines of daily life. I'm not saying it's not useful. I guess what I'm saying is our lifestyles generally don't demand we be really really strong. That's why most Americans are overweight. Our lifestyles point us to being sedentary. I work out to counteract that.

    Most Americans are overweight from eating habits not so much as less activity although that contributes. I am one of those Americans who had bed eating habits but tried to out run a poor diet. Literally out run and lift.

    I actually disagree. If you read the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, Almanzo Wilder's family over ate constantly but worked it off. They had literally no knowledge of nutrition and went for long periods without any green vegetables, etc.

    When you look at your micronutrient requirements, you'll notice that you can fulfill them with a fraction of your calorie allowance if you mindfully eat. We evolved in natural systems where there were seasonally abundant foods that did not provide balanced nutrition at all times.

    Also, if you look at studies that examine the effects of nutrition on various health indicators (like cholesterol, hypertension, etc) it's really murky. If you look at the effects of exercise, the results are usually pretty clear. Exercise is good.

    Eating a balanced diet and getting plenty of exercise is obviously the best way to go. But if I was to advise somebody on the single thing that would have maximum impact, I'd suggest starting with the 30 minutes of vigorous activity 5 days a week.

    Are you disagreeing with my exercise comment because all of what you said about nutrition is agreeing with me. As max for weight lost its nutrition. For muscle gains you add workouts but with poor nutrition no muscle gains.
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
    So you're saying basketball is a real world application? LOL

    And as far as working out translating to real life I'd question if it does for many people. Like many I sit at a desk all day. I don't work out to be better at sitting at a desk. I work out to be better BECAUSE I sit at a desk.

    what if your build came crumbling down on you right now? I think some gym lifting would help to get out rather then being too weak to lift anything.

    LOL I get it. If disaster strikes it's helpful. I'm thinking more along the lines of daily life. I'm not saying it's not useful. I guess what I'm saying is our lifestyles generally don't demand we be really really strong. That's why most Americans are overweight. Our lifestyles point us to being sedentary. I work out to counteract that.

    Most Americans are overweight from eating habits not so much as less activity although that contributes. I am one of those Americans who had bed eating habits but tried to out run a poor diet. Literally out run and lift.

    I actually disagree. If you read the Laura Ingalls Wilder books, Almanzo Wilder's family over ate constantly but worked it off. They had literally no knowledge of nutrition and went for long periods without any green vegetables, etc.

    When you look at your micronutrient requirements, you'll notice that you can fulfill them with a fraction of your calorie allowance if you mindfully eat. We evolved in natural systems where there were seasonally abundant foods that did not provide balanced nutrition at all times.

    Also, if you look at studies that examine the effects of nutrition on various health indicators (like cholesterol, hypertension, etc) it's really murky. If you look at the effects of exercise, the results are usually pretty clear. Exercise is good.

    Eating a balanced diet and getting plenty of exercise is obviously the best way to go. But if I was to advise somebody on the single thing that would have maximum impact, I'd suggest starting with the 30 minutes of vigorous activity 5 days a week.

    Are you disagreeing with my exercise comment because all of what you said about nutrition is agreeing with me. As max for weight lost its nutrition. For muscle gains you add workouts but with poor nutrition no muscle gains.

    To lose weight, I agree that's in the kitchen.

    To BECOME overweight, especially as a society, I think daily activity is as great a force as diet.

    As one Runner's World article put it - Research has shown that running doesn't help you lose weight. But it helps you keep the weight off after you've lost it. It kind of gives the body another lever to use in maintaining homeostasis amid environmental variables.

    People DON'T try to out exercise a bad diet. They eat that cheeseburger now, promising they'll dust off the treadmill later, but then end up texting their friends while catching up on Mad Men.

    I really think that you could eat a S.A.D. but, if you had the daily activity level of the Tarahumara, you'd be fine.
  • yopeeps025
    yopeeps025 Posts: 8,680 Member
    so untrue in my experience. I used to workout at least 12 hours a week hour lift hour elliptical 6 days a week. when I was not losing when I looked at my diet and decrease calories significantly. I was plugin in my weight on the elliptical and burning a 1000 calories. I lost 50 in like 5 months. Everyone else saw the new me. I saw a smaller fat person. I lost motivation and gained it all back five 15 more pounds. Now all of that workout has help me kinda maintain a decent metabolism. This time around on a good week I clock in 7 hours of workouts actually it probably more. I don't really keep counts since I love exercising.
  • likitisplit
    likitisplit Posts: 9,420 Member
    so untrue in my experience. I used to workout at least 12 hours a week hour lift hour elliptical. when I was not losing when I looked at my diet and decrease calories significantly. I was plugin in my weight on the elliptical and burning a 1000 calories. I lost 50 in like 5 months. Everyone else saw the new me. I saw a smaller fat person. I lost motivation and gained it all back five 15 more pounds. Now all of that workout has help me kinda maintain a decent metabolism.

    I still think that losing is different than maintaining in the first place, but I respect your experience.

    I started the Couch to 5k program after being sedentary with a pair of babies and had the fat basically melt off me in the two months before I started MFP. Getting my macros and nutrition right was tremendous. I was almost never hungry and just dropping pounds like some sort of machine.
  • contingencyplan
    contingencyplan Posts: 3,639 Member
    The deadlift, the barbell squat, the power clean, the overhead press--all functional lifts. You replicate these lifts in day to day life whether you realize it or not. Strong in the weight room means nothing outside of it? When I went down on my 400+ lb motorcycle and had to pick it back up again, what do you think that was? A deadlift. Ever see a mother pick up her toddler child? That explosive hip-jump to get the kid up to chest height in her arms? That's a power clean.

    Tell me a half decent climber who doesn't supplement with rows and deadlifts.

    You mean to tell me I've been a pro at power cleans all this time?!?! :noway: :bigsmile:

    I've been watching youtube videos and still can't get the form down with my 4-year-old. I wish somebody would write a book. I'm dead serious.

    Learning how to properly squat has completely saved my back during bath nights.

    The book has already been written. It's called Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. Check it out.
  • amandzor
    amandzor Posts: 386 Member
    Basketball is not a sport which requires strength.

    Challenge him on the rugby pitch, and you'll see just how much of a beast he is.
  • yopeeps025
    yopeeps025 Posts: 8,680 Member
    so untrue in my experience. I used to workout at least 12 hours a week hour lift hour elliptical. when I was not losing when I looked at my diet and decrease calories significantly. I was plugin in my weight on the elliptical and burning a 1000 calories. I lost 50 in like 5 months. Everyone else saw the new me. I saw a smaller fat person. I lost motivation and gained it all back five 15 more pounds. Now all of that workout has help me kinda maintain a decent metabolism.

    I still think that losing is different than maintaining in the first place, but I respect your experience.

    I started the Couch to 5k program after being sedentary with a pair of babies and had the fat basically melt off me in the two months before I started MFP. Getting my macros and nutrition right was tremendous. I was almost never hungry and just dropping pounds like some sort of machine.

    Im not maintaining I want to get down to around 175-180 with 12% body fat and be able to bench, dead lift, and squat at least 200% of body weight.
  • contingencyplan
    contingencyplan Posts: 3,639 Member
    Basketball is not a sport which requires strength.

    Challenge him on the rugby pitch, and you'll see just how much of a beast he is.

    Basketball may not require strength on the court, but it does require explosiveness, which a proper strength training regimen incorporating Oly lifts will GREATLY aid in developing.
  • Fujiberry
    Fujiberry Posts: 400 Member
    To me, the OP reads like "Hey, this dude looks way better than me, but I can hold my own in basketball SO THERE"

    ^ This. I feel like this quote applies:
    “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”