Can someone cut through the bull and tell me the truth!

1235

Replies

  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,552 Member
    tomatoey wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    I'm now curious- what's the weight limit to stop running?

    i don't know if there's a hard cutoff, you know, but in general: every pound of body weight is an additional 3 pounds of pressure on the knees, and 6 on the hips. so there's just that; also, the effects of any awkward biomechanics are likely to be magnified by additional weight.

    I was asking slightly tongue in cheek- those big foot ball guys run quiet a bit- and are very good at it.

    A lot of it has to do with HOW you're carrying that weight- and how inefficiently you are running.

    Certainly there is a point where walking will garner you more results than running will- as it will be easier on the body and more sustainable (in terms of time)- as someone up thread said- she began running when walking felt to easy.
  • WinoGelato
    WinoGelato Posts: 13,456 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    So two big things. well 3.

    1.) Calories- you must be at a calorie deficit to lose weight. Period. No working out required.
    2.) Lifting weights will help retain muscle mass so you don't just look like a smaller version of what you are now.
    3.) A well rounded fitness program for your health and wellness should/will include a cardiovascular component and a strength/resistance training program.

    Those are the 3 big things.


    You can start with the calories- that's easy. Log daily- buy a food scale- use MFP- or google TDEE and use that- either one is fine.

    As for cardio- either for running- try couch to 5K- great beginner program- if you want to run. walking is fine- row machine- bike- whatever- not relevant unless you have a specific goal in mind.

    For lifting
    Strong lifts
    New rules of lifting
    starting strength
    strong curves

    or you can do body weight-
    body by you
    you are your own gym
    convict conditioning

    all great places to get started!

    cosign

    its' a good expression right!!! :D

    cosigned again …

    LOL

    :)

    Yes, it is and I have totally stolen it from you ….

    Sine and Tan feel you're too obtuse with cosine.

    I try not to be acute on the boards. I feel it's the wrong angle to take- we might get to far off on a tangent.

    In for Trigonometry humor!
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,204 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    I'm now curious- what's the weight limit to stop running?

    From now on when people ask me why I don't run I'm just going to tell them that I did a bulk and now I'm too heavy and I can't, so I just have to ride my bike...
  • SingingSingleTracker
    SingingSingleTracker Posts: 1,866 Member
    Lofteren wrote: »
    laddyboy wrote: »

    This one...
    I will add 1 or 2 things just to stick in your mind.
    1. doing long cardio sessions only will burn your muscle for energy. That's why lifting is important. Your muscle is your metabolism. The more muscle you build...the better your metabolism.
    2. Muscle burns fat. You body doesn't want to build muscle because it's hard for it to maintain it. In turn...your body has to constantly tap into the fat stores to maintain the muscle. I like the sound of that. AND...you won't get big and bulky.

    The 'professor' in all of us wants to know if you can clean up or back up that Bro Science for us....?

    Doing long cardio sessions only will burn your muscle for energy?

    Really? Could you cite your sources for that please?

    Muscle burns fat.

    Really? Could you cite your sources for that please?







    This is what I was talking about when I said that people depending on "peer reviewed studies" perpetuates the BS in the fitness industry. Doing long, slow periods of exercise does not require high quality fuel so it will burn tissue indiscriminately. Muscle is a tissue. Your body will burn it right along with fat, glycogen, etc... unless you are doing something to make your body want to keep it (i.e. something that activates the M-Tor amino acid pathway or causes an influx of androgens/growth hormone which would, in turn, activate the M-Tor amino acid pathway). These things would include more intense forms of exercise such as HIIT or strength training. I'm not hating on LISS, I'm simply stating what happens when someone does too much LISS. A study is not needed to determine this. One would simply need to come from a point of increased muscular strength and hypertrophy and then add a bunch of LISS to their training to see the effects of it.

    Also, muscle does have a higher metabolic demand than other tissues, so having more muscle does increase a person's metabolic rate. It doesn't make as much of a difference as a lot of people say it does (it is roughly 30kcals per lb of muscle per 24 hours which wouldn't make a huge difference on the calipers) but it does increase resting caloric expenditure nonetheless.

    No sources need to be sighted for any of this information as it is pretty common knowledge (maybe not the actual means through which this phenomenon occurs, but people still know it to be a true and are not incorrect in doing so).

    Ha!

    In other words, your pant legs are firmly rolled up high enough to not get dirty in the BS.

    Have a read at Jay's chance to give you a go around with your Bro Sci...

    http://www.aworkoutroutine.com/does-building-muscle-burn-fat/


  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,552 Member
    Kruggeri wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    So two big things. well 3.

    1.) Calories- you must be at a calorie deficit to lose weight. Period. No working out required.
    2.) Lifting weights will help retain muscle mass so you don't just look like a smaller version of what you are now.
    3.) A well rounded fitness program for your health and wellness should/will include a cardiovascular component and a strength/resistance training program.

    Those are the 3 big things.


    You can start with the calories- that's easy. Log daily- buy a food scale- use MFP- or google TDEE and use that- either one is fine.

    As for cardio- either for running- try couch to 5K- great beginner program- if you want to run. walking is fine- row machine- bike- whatever- not relevant unless you have a specific goal in mind.

    For lifting
    Strong lifts
    New rules of lifting
    starting strength
    strong curves

    or you can do body weight-
    body by you
    you are your own gym
    convict conditioning

    all great places to get started!

    cosign

    its' a good expression right!!! :D

    cosigned again …

    LOL

    :)

    Yes, it is and I have totally stolen it from you ….

    Sine and Tan feel you're too obtuse with cosine.

    I try not to be acute on the boards. I feel it's the wrong angle to take- we might get to far off on a tangent.

    In for Trigonometry humor!

    It's an integral part of our discussion.


    Oh yeah- Break through to Algebra 3 biatches.
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,552 Member
    edited April 2015
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    I'm now curious- what's the weight limit to stop running?

    From now on when people ask me why I don't run I'm just going to tell them that I did a bulk and now I'm too heavy and I can't, so I just have to ride my bike...

    YES!!!!!

    That's my excuse now too. Only my bike is a vroom vroom bike- so I don't think it'll get me as far in the excuse department LULZ
  • leenk7991
    leenk7991 Posts: 3 Member
    what I know is if you wanna lose weight you have to cut down the amount of calorie intake. If want adjust ur body composition like lose fat for example, you should adjust your macros so that you don't eat as much fat but more carbs and protein. And if the same calorie intake isn't changed then it won't affect your weight, you will only have less fat percentage in body. hope that explain xD.
  • kshadows
    kshadows Posts: 1,315 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    So two big things. well 3.

    1.) Calories- you must be at a calorie deficit to lose weight. Period. No working out required.
    2.) Lifting weights will help retain muscle mass so you don't just look like a smaller version of what you are now.
    3.) A well rounded fitness program for your health and wellness should/will include a cardiovascular component and a strength/resistance training program.

    Those are the 3 big things.


    You can start with the calories- that's easy. Log daily- buy a food scale- use MFP- or google TDEE and use that- either one is fine.

    As for cardio- either for running- try couch to 5K- great beginner program- if you want to run. walking is fine- row machine- bike- whatever- not relevant unless you have a specific goal in mind.

    For lifting
    Strong lifts
    New rules of lifting
    starting strength
    strong curves

    or you can do body weight-
    body by you
    you are your own gym
    convict conditioning

    all great places to get started!

    So much this.
  • liekewheeless
    liekewheeless Posts: 416 Member
    What ever you can stick with.

    The main thing is that you are in a calorie deficit. As long as you make sure of that, everything else should be things you can stick with.

    Don't design a program that works for everyone else if you have to torture yourself to stick to it.

    Sure there are things that are healthier,... faster, or whatever...but the main thing is that you don't get burned out on it.
  • ChampCrucial
    ChampCrucial Posts: 120 Member
    My man Lofteren is spot on. Everyone is giving good advice as I can tell. I will only speak on what hasn't been pointed out. A Strength program like strong lifts is borderline perfect. This style of lifting will not leave you mentally and physically exhausted on top of your sleep deprivation. It uses low volume which keeps your mind and body fresher. In addition, it is good for any lady as it will strengthen your bones since your lifts get increasingly heavy and it will give you more strength to hoist, play, and keep up with your child as an added bonus.

    Other than that, as someone else said, find what is fun. I say especially for cardio. This will cut some fat and give you a mental break rather than doing cardio you know you hate. Below is my example but I hope my little bit helps!

    I love to bike with friends on weekends and play basketball the nights before I know I can sleep in. I now do Strength 5X5s to improve my strength and joints while keeping my energy up as I intern, work 2 jobs, and take max hours of courses. I feel great!!! Whereas on a program.... I would do 4 or 5 sets of 10 to 15 reps and cardio after which left me drained, too tired for super fun cardio, behind in classwork, and burned out.
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,552 Member
    I will only speak on what hasn't been pointed out. A Strength program like strong lifts is borderline perfect


    it was pointed out... first post.
    I listed several progressive lifting programs for beginners.
  • AllanMisner
    AllanMisner Posts: 4,147 Member
    Kruggeri wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    ndj1979 wrote: »
    JoRocka wrote: »
    So two big things. well 3.

    1.) Calories- you must be at a calorie deficit to lose weight. Period. No working out required.
    2.) Lifting weights will help retain muscle mass so you don't just look like a smaller version of what you are now.
    3.) A well rounded fitness program for your health and wellness should/will include a cardiovascular component and a strength/resistance training program.

    Those are the 3 big things.


    You can start with the calories- that's easy. Log daily- buy a food scale- use MFP- or google TDEE and use that- either one is fine.

    As for cardio- either for running- try couch to 5K- great beginner program- if you want to run. walking is fine- row machine- bike- whatever- not relevant unless you have a specific goal in mind.

    For lifting
    Strong lifts
    New rules of lifting
    starting strength
    strong curves

    or you can do body weight-
    body by you
    you are your own gym
    convict conditioning

    all great places to get started!

    cosign

    its' a good expression right!!! :D

    cosigned again …

    LOL

    :)

    Yes, it is and I have totally stolen it from you ….

    Sine and Tan feel you're too obtuse with cosine.

    I try not to be acute on the boards. I feel it's the wrong angle to take- we might get to far off on a tangent.

    In for Trigonometry humor!

    Look the math stuff as got to stop!
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    edited April 2015
    tzarba wrote: »
    It was tough, but you'll train yourself to run at 7.0, 7.5, even 8. The great thing is you know the runs are for a short time.

    I'd argue that 8mph isn't HIIT.

    If 30 seconds of 8mph is hitting you hard enough to be limited to 6 intervals then your aerobic base is inadequate.

    Personally I find 20=30 minutes at 8mph quite hard work.
  • chivalryder
    chivalryder Posts: 4,391 Member
    tzarba wrote: »
    It was tough, but you'll train yourself to run at 7.0, 7.5, even 8. The great thing is you know the runs are for a short time.

    I'd argue that 8mph isn't HIIT.

    If 30 seconds of 8mph is hitting you hard enough to be limited to 6 intervals then your aerobic base is inadequate.

    Personally I find 20=30 minutes at 8mph quite hard work.

    I have to agree with this.

    HIIT is going 100%, nearly hitting your Max HR for 30ish seconds.

    Then resting for 1 or 2 minutes, where your heart needs to be strong enough and conditioned well enough that it can drop back down to aerobic or below in just a few seconds. Lather, rinse, repeat a few times for up to 30 minutes.

    When you're finished, you'll probably collapse off the treadmill because you've pushed yourself so damn hard and you've used up all of your glycogen stores.

    You won't be able to do this unless you consider yourself an 'intermediate' level athlete or higher.
  • newport3158
    newport3158 Posts: 75 Member
    loxottica wrote: »
    I'm so tired of searching, googling, reading about "do this and do that" "and eat this and eat that"....

    I just want to know the truth, the facts not the "it may" do this or that..

    what am I referring to? work outs.. some say:

    1. do cardio only for weight loss
    2. do weights only for weight loss
    3. do hiit only..
    4. do slooooow long runs
    5. work out only in the morning on empty stomach
    6. work out when ever...
    7. eat ... dont eat b4 working out...

    do you see what I'm saying?? the list keeps going on! this is all so confusing...

    I'm 39, 5'1 and I have 40lbs to hit my goal (125lbs). I'm a single mom of 2 little ones so I'm a bit sleep deprived most of the times. So I have signed up for gym where I work so I can go on my lunch hours.

    My goal for now is to lose weight so I can fit into my work clothes as I just cant afford to buy new ones. Once I can get into them I can focus on the body definition that I want. But I just need to fit into my work clothes!

    So I'm asking for help and I guess I'm venting a little...
    ..can you help?

    You have to figure out what works best for your body since everyBODY is different. For me, after 8 years I've discovered I need to eat 50% protein, 30% fats, 20% carbs, between 1700-1800 calories. I need to do 30-45 min of HIIT cardio first, then heavy circuit style weight lifting with 30-45 seconds of rest between sets. I need to workout sort of in a fasted state and I need the supplements CLA, L-carnitine, ALA, a multivitamin every other day, halotropin, BCAAs, and 12+ cups of water daily. It's a science experiment and after 8 years of trial and error with different methods this is what I've uncovered about my body.
  • WinoGelato
    WinoGelato Posts: 13,456 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    I will only speak on what hasn't been pointed out. A Strength program like strong lifts is borderline perfect


    it was pointed out... first post.
    I listed several progressive lifting programs for beginners.

    Those were Prime examples!
  • jsanford76
    jsanford76 Posts: 20 Member
    JoRocka wrote: »
    So two big things. well 3.

    1.) Calories- you must be at a calorie deficit to lose weight. Period. No working out required.
    2.) Lifting weights will help retain muscle mass so you don't just look like a smaller version of what you are now.
    3.) A well rounded fitness program for your health and wellness should/will include a cardiovascular component and a strength/resistance training program.

    Those are the 3 big things.


    You can start with the calories- that's easy. Log daily- buy a food scale- use MFP- or google TDEE and use that- either one is fine.

    As for cardio- either for running- try couch to 5K- great beginner program- if you want to run. walking is fine- row machine- bike- whatever- not relevant unless you have a specific goal in mind.

    For lifting
    Strong lifts
    New rules of lifting
    starting strength
    strong curves

    or you can do body weight-
    body by you
    you are your own gym
    convict conditioning

    all great places to get started!


    I agree. Basically do whatever you will enjoy for exercise, if you enjoy it you will be more likely to stick with it, if you don't enjoy it you won't.
    The best exercise program is which ever one you will stick to, the best diet is which ever one you will stick to.
    Calories in vs calories out, and you WILL lose weight.

  • JoRocka wrote: »
    So two big things. well 3.

    1.) Calories- you must be at a calorie deficit to lose weight. Period. No working out required.
    2.) Lifting weights will help retain muscle mass so you don't just look like a smaller version of what you are now.
    3.) A well rounded fitness program for your health and wellness should/will include a cardiovascular component and a strength/resistance training program.

    Those are the 3 big things.


    You can start with the calories- that's easy. Log daily- buy a food scale- use MFP- or google TDEE and use that- either one is fine.

    As for cardio- either for running- try couch to 5K- great beginner program- if you want to run. walking is fine- row machine- bike- whatever- not relevant unless you have a specific goal in mind.

    For lifting
    Strong lifts
    New rules of lifting
    starting strength
    strong curves

    or you can do body weight-
    body by you
    you are your own gym
    convict conditioning

    all great places to get started!

    Nailed it
  • MynameisJerryB
    MynameisJerryB Posts: 168 Member
    I haven't read through all the comments but just find an activity that you enjoy doing and stick with it, even if it's just walking. Eat at a calorie deficit and you'll lose weight. By the way, excercise isn't needed for weight loss, but it does allow you to eat more calories and makes you healthier.
  • Lofteren
    Lofteren Posts: 960 Member
    Lofteren wrote: »
    laddyboy wrote: »

    This one...
    I will add 1 or 2 things just to stick in your mind.
    1. doing long cardio sessions only will burn your muscle for energy. That's why lifting is important. Your muscle is your metabolism. The more muscle you build...the better your metabolism.
    2. Muscle burns fat. You body doesn't want to build muscle because it's hard for it to maintain it. In turn...your body has to constantly tap into the fat stores to maintain the muscle. I like the sound of that. AND...you won't get big and bulky.

    The 'professor' in all of us wants to know if you can clean up or back up that Bro Science for us....?

    Doing long cardio sessions only will burn your muscle for energy?

    Really? Could you cite your sources for that please?

    Muscle burns fat.

    Really? Could you cite your sources for that please?







    This is what I was talking about when I said that people depending on "peer reviewed studies" perpetuates the BS in the fitness industry. Doing long, slow periods of exercise does not require high quality fuel so it will burn tissue indiscriminately. Muscle is a tissue. Your body will burn it right along with fat, glycogen, etc... unless you are doing something to make your body want to keep it (i.e. something that activates the M-Tor amino acid pathway or causes an influx of androgens/growth hormone which would, in turn, activate the M-Tor amino acid pathway). These things would include more intense forms of exercise such as HIIT or strength training. I'm not hating on LISS, I'm simply stating what happens when someone does too much LISS. A study is not needed to determine this. One would simply need to come from a point of increased muscular strength and hypertrophy and then add a bunch of LISS to their training to see the effects of it.

    Also, muscle does have a higher metabolic demand than other tissues, so having more muscle does increase a person's metabolic rate. It doesn't make as much of a difference as a lot of people say it does (it is roughly 30kcals per lb of muscle per 24 hours which wouldn't make a huge difference on the calipers) but it does increase resting caloric expenditure nonetheless.

    No sources need to be sighted for any of this information as it is pretty common knowledge (maybe not the actual means through which this phenomenon occurs, but people still know it to be a true and are not incorrect in doing so).

    Ha!

    In other words, your pant legs are firmly rolled up high enough to not get dirty in the BS.

    Have a read at Jay's chance to give you a go around with your Bro Sci...

    http://www.aworkoutroutine.com/does-building-muscle-burn-fat/


    It's not like that at all.

    Look, I am a the first guy who will crack open an electroneuromuscular physiology book and nerd out for 3 hours, that's my job actually, but when it comes to the gym I just train with simple, time tested methods and I completely let out my inner meathead. You "I need to see a study on that" types may laugh and mock me but at the end of the day, I lost 60lbs in a year while moving from a Masters level raw powerlifting total to an elite level raw powerlifting total (I added 215lbs to it in 1 year. From 1615 to 1830) all without reading any bs studies. I also started doing some martial arts dueing that period of time and brought my conditioning up a lot.

    Moral of the story, you just keep laughing and reading your studies. I'll keep training like a meathead and improving.