shy runner

Options
13

Replies

  • yusaku02
    yusaku02 Posts: 3,476 Member
    Options
    aineqt wrote: »
    I know no one cares I ment any tips to over come being paranoid about it
    Realize that every person you pass by outside cares as little about you as you do about them. Once you realize that they will have forgotten about you entirely about 5 seconds after you disappear from their view there will be nothing to be paranoid about.
  • tatilove1988
    tatilove1988 Posts: 319 Member
    Options
    Hey there,

    Your fear is totally justified and a lot of newbies, including myself, have been there. I have been wanting to get into running for years now and was self conscious about running alone. I was so motivated to do it that I downloaded mapmyrun, but never got to use it much aa I would only go out there if I had a friend. Had the same issue with the gym. But I recently got ovee my fear, started the gym in mid March, and started running outside sometime in April. Now I can run 12 kilometres nonstop and prefer running alone most of the time. Glad I finally said "to hell with it" and started running. Take that leap and you will be glad you did.

    Also, about stretching... it's best to do static stretches AFTER running. Before running you can do dynamic stretches, which can also be part of a warmup.

    Good luck with your running!

    From a newbie to another.

    Tati
  • dewd2
    dewd2 Posts: 2,449 Member
    Options
    I suggest you find a local running club and join it. You will be very surprised how supportive and welcoming they are. No one cares what you look like. All they care about is the enjoyment you get from running.

    Check to see if your local running store has group runs or classes. See if there's a local Team in Training program. Or just go to the park and join in the fun.
  • rockstar53
    rockstar53 Posts: 215 Member
    Options
    I'm in the same boat. I just started running again. I am overweight and extremely slow. It's funny cause if I run with a friend, who is also slow and overweight, I don't think twice about who sees us. But when I go alone, I feel very self conscious. But this week, I decided, I have to get just over myself and get out there. LOL! So I did. I went on quieter streets. I took a walking break past construction workers (baby steps, right!) and I survived!!
    I so badly want to make running a part of my routine, I need to get over the hurdles that my mind is putting up. My body is doing everything I'm asking of it, it's my mind that is causing me grief. LOL!
  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
    edited September 2015
    Options
    aineqt wrote: »
    Hey guys I'm wanting to take it to the next level and start running I was wondering if you had any tips for me on that

    @aineqt Probably there are enough responses on the being nervous about running in public aspect of your original post.

    As for tips:
    1. Be sure you are outfitted with good shoes appropriate for you and to the task. Visit a speciality running shop and get their advice if you haven't already.
    2. Scale in slowly. Adopting a program like Couch to 5K or some other progressive walk-run-walk program that moves on to run-walk-run and eventually... !run! is a good way to get going. If you do adopt C25K and find a week particularly challenging, don't sweat it, repeat that week again before moving on.
    3. Run slowly. You don't need to sprint or even push yourself super hard to get a ton of benefit and new runners shouldn't be try to do either. You build endurance by spending more time out there running, not by running X distance faster. Running slowly means running at a pace that still allows you to carry on something of a conversation without gasping for breath between words or phrases.
    4. Don't fear taking walking breaks. There is no shame in walking. Hey, pro ultra-marathon runners walk! Especially early on you may find it difficult to maintain a slow pace that passes the "conversation test"; if your heart rate starts climbing quick and breathing becomes laboured use that as a cue to walk for a minute or until you've recovered enough and then restart. In these early days where you are trying to build endurance and also remain highly motivated, it's best is to avoid letting your HR/breathing get to that point.
    5. Have faith that you will improve and progress. At the start it might feel like it will take a long time, but it won't.
    6. Have fun! Consider joining a running group - they are fun! - they typically have pace-groups that cater to all levels and running can be very social. Having someone to talk to makes the time fly by and also tends to solve the nervousness problem too because other people just like you or me will be out there too.
    Number one tip: have fun. Enjoy it!
  • kallemann67
    kallemann67 Posts: 92 Member
    Options
    Sweating and being red faced are the least of your worries once you head out. I could list a few other things which are much more embarrassing that could happen but wouldn't want to put you off of running altogether.

    I think as you pursue more out in the public activities you slowly erase presumptions made by joe public about you. The running high you get certainly contributes to this. Try not to overthink this and instead just go. The sweat and red face will become badges of honour when you complete your maximum distance. Walking into a Starbucks knowing you just polished off 10k and are sweating and red will be a sign of pride not embarrassment. And anyone giving you a 'look' will have you shooting back a glance which says - drop that coffee cup and come run 10k with me you turkey and we'll see who's laughing at who then.
  • tatilove1988
    tatilove1988 Posts: 319 Member
    edited September 2015
    Options
    - drop that coffee cup and come run 10k with me you turkey and we'll see who's laughing at who then.

    hehe... Gold!
  • Madux1818
    Madux1818 Posts: 307 Member
    Options
    I'm a slow runner. I put on my cap, headphones and run. Its me, my music, and the road!
  • Psychgrrl
    Psychgrrl Posts: 3,177 Member
    Options
    I'm on my phone and can't post the link for you, but OP, go to YouTube and search for "The One Where Pheobe Runs." :) Personally, I do carry pepper spray--we have a coyote problem here in SoCal.

    The moral of the story is to do it for yourself, wear a cute outfit with athletic fabric that makes you feel good, carry pepper spray and don't give a flying f*** what anyone thinks!
  • sheldonklein
    sheldonklein Posts: 854 Member
    Options
    OP: A local high school track is a good way to start running if you want a safe, secluded place
  • Becky_charles29
    Becky_charles29 Posts: 125 Member
    Options
    As a city runner, if I see ANYONE running I think go you! We all started somewhere. As for the red faced sweatiness...I've been running for 5 years now and still get it. I am more likely to judge the overweight people I encounter who I say excuse me to pass, who will then tut and say something like "bloody runners"! They make my blood boil!

    But seriously, I see all types running in London and it's great! Slow/fast/young/old...the works! Most people will be praising you for getting out there and doing something for your health...and for the small minority who don't...they are normally just jealous and spiteful with nothing better to do with their time!

    Good luck and get out there
  • melholmes80
    melholmes80 Posts: 36 Member
    Options
    OP: A local high school track is a good way to start running if you want a safe, secluded place

    I was super self conscious and my own worst enemy when I started. So I hid on the local high school, track by myself until I felt brave enough to run on the sidewalks. Totally agree with the recommendations for couch to 5k...I went from being winded walking up stairs to running 23 min straight without walking and I'm only on week 6!

    Best of luck
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    Options
    I panic/anxiety attack my *kitten* off for about 50% of my runs due to various anxiety issues. But the same happened when I started exercising at home with the curtains shut. It gets better and the attacks are slowly slowly getting better after running outside for a couple of months. I go early in the morning mostly, sometimes in the evening as close to dusk as I dare (I run in a park and wouldn't want to run in it when dark I don't think).

    Is it easy to get over what we now are irrational fears? No. Do you feel super extra accomplished at the end of that run because of the double whammy achievement? Oh yes!

    I also make sure I love my running kit (as much as someone who wears vintage at all other times can enjoy modern lycra!) so that I'm all look how badass I am. Essentially I play psychological games with myself in a positive way. I'm 189lbs and my face goes bright scarlet within seconds of starting but I just don't care because I am doing it for me and my own mental and physical health. Other runners barely look at me, mostly because I live in London, eye contact is akin to sharing a bed with a stranger round these parts but also because they're doing their thing. I see all shapes, sizes, abilities and ages while out there. Plus I get to make friends with the odd friendly dog, bonus!

    The first time is the worst, it gets better after that, I promise.
  • stealthq
    stealthq Posts: 4,298 Member
    edited September 2015
    Options
    OP, don't worry. There are very, very few people that look good running. And even fewer that think they look good running. When you run you see all types, all shapes, all ages, all gaits. You will not stand out much for your weight.

    If you stand out to me it is because you just blew past me like I'm standing still, because you decided to be a jerk to me for some reason (rare, but I came across one this weekend), or because there is something so unusual about your gait it catches my attention.

    That last one has to be pretty significant - there's an amputee that runs where I do, and a couple of people that I appear to have had a stroke or something that caused similar one-sided impairment. Unbelievably impressive folks, if you ask me.

    [Edited by MFP Staff]
  • flickarsg
    flickarsg Posts: 8 Member
    Options
    You will have to decide what is more important to you. Are you going to let your fear stop you from doing what you want to do? I think most of us started out with that same feeling about not wanting to be seen when we're just getting started. Just go get it over with. Who cares if someone sees you? Maybe you could grab a buddy to run with you, would that make it less intimidating? Anyway, once you do it, it will become no big deal, so the sooner you let go of your fear and do it, the better off you'll be. And then you'll ask yourself, "why didn't I do this sooner?"
  • pondee629
    pondee629 Posts: 2,469 Member
    Options
    aineqt wrote: »
    I know no one cares I ment any tips to over come being paranoid about it

    “Sing like no one's listening, love like you've never been hurt, dance like nobody's watching, and live like its heaven on earth.”
    Mark Twain; and

    Run like no one sees you. To quote Nike; " Just do it"

  • Stoshew71
    Stoshew71 Posts: 6,553 Member
    Options
    More like... "Dance until your feet hurt, sing until your lungs hurt. Act until you're William Hurt" Phil Dumphy
  • mwyvr
    mwyvr Posts: 1,883 Member
    Options
    Hopefully @aineqt 's absence from the thread is due to lots of running outside in public.
  • aineqt
    aineqt Posts: 22 Member
    Options
    Yeah I went for a run and it was grand until I got back to the street were I live and one of the neighbours stopped and watched me running the whole way until I got to my house ....I didn't appreciate that now. I checked and there is no local running groups so I may ask a friend to go with me, I do prefer to run by myself anyway and there is no school tracks were I live . Thanks for your comments though they were very much appreciated.