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Essential Oils

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  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Member Posts: 8,697 Member Member Posts: 8,697 Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    Add DMSO and that changes things. Interesting tidbit - some essential oil containing products contain a fair bit of DMSO. Personally, considering that some essential oils can be toxic depending on dose, I'd be reluctant to use such a product without there being some research done on the effects.

    Playing with DMSO is probably not a good idea. Might get him a Darwin Award.
    Totally this. Stay away from DSMO. It can kill you.

  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,583 Member Member Posts: 2,583 Member
    I will say this. Since that time I used a lot of oil (which was months ago) I don't recall feeling that way since then, and hadn't felt like that months before then either. A coincidence? I guess anything is possible, but odds of the two being unrelated are very, very low.
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,424 Member Member Posts: 24,424 Member
    I took this out of the book I have on essential oils. Not sure if the rest of you believe it, but I think it could easily explain what happened the particular instance when I rubbed an excessive amount of oil on my skin. Notice the first section at the top and what it says about putting more. xigwhzeipjyr.jpg

    But nothing there says it goes to your colon.
    Do you really think 1-3 drops of something rubbed on your feet detoxes your body?

  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Member Posts: 8,697 Member Member Posts: 8,697 Member
    Detoxes your body of what exactly?
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,424 Member Member Posts: 24,424 Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    Add DMSO and that changes things. Interesting tidbit - some essential oil containing products contain a fair bit of DMSO. Personally, considering that some essential oils can be toxic depending on dose, I'd be reluctant to use such a product without there being some research done on the effects.

    Playing with DMSO is probably not a good idea. Might get him a Darwin Award.
    Totally this. Stay away from DSMO. It can kill you.

    Yeah, used it in the 90s for cell permeabilisation in cell culture work.
    Under a full isolation biohazard hood. Can be nasty stuff.
  • _Waffle__Waffle_ Member Posts: 13,080 Member Member Posts: 13,080 Member
    Detoxes your body of what exactly?

    Toxins of course. :smile:
  • vingoglyvingogly Member, Premium Posts: 1,781 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,781 Member
    _Waffle_ wrote: »
    Rubbing it on your belly isn't the same as shooting it up your rectum.

    This line made visiting this forum worthwhile today. Well played.
  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Member Posts: 8,697 Member Member Posts: 8,697 Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    This is an image of a colon (see the arrow.)
    As you can see, it isn't really near the abdominal surface (skin, muscles, fat, fascia, etc...)
    Surface oils are not going to reach the colon, not unless you bath in them 24/7.

    mr475137.fig1a.jpg

    I'm following what you're saying here. However, in theory (I say this because I haven't found scientific studies on this, so if anyone knows of any, let me know) E.O.'s are absorbed into the blood stream when applied topically and your body "carries" it to where it needs to go. Just as if you were to take an advil it would help your back pain. Now, if that theory were proven, I could understand how rubbing it on the skin anywhere would help. Maybe that is what Forecaster is trying to get at?

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    Add DMSO and that changes things. Interesting tidbit - some essential oil containing products contain a fair bit of DMSO. Personally, considering that some essential oils can be toxic depending on dose, I'd be reluctant to use such a product without there being some research done on the effects.

    Playing with DMSO is probably not a good idea. Might get him a Darwin Award.
    Totally this. Stay away from DSMO. It can kill you.

    Yeah, used it in the 90s for cell permeabilisation in cell culture work.
    Under a full isolation biohazard hood. Can be nasty stuff.

    Well everyone who gets cancer has been exposed to DSMO so be very careful. I fear for your future.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,583 Member Member Posts: 2,583 Member
    I took this out of the book I have on essential oils. Not sure if the rest of you believe it, but I think it could easily explain what happened the particular instance when I rubbed an excessive amount of oil on my skin. Notice the first section at the top and what it says about putting more. xigwhzeipjyr.jpg

    But nothing there says it goes to your colon.
    Do you really think 1-3 drops of something rubbed on your feet detoxes your body?
    While not the colon itself, the article I posted mentioned the oil relaxing the smooth muscle surrounding the colon. That has implications for IBS (although as you mentioned they were referring to injesting the oil instead of using it topically).

    Do I think that simply rubbing a few drops of a random oil on the feet can have any kind of detoxification properties? No. While I don't think essential oils are necessarily a magic cure for health issues, I can tell you that they are extremely potent and can be dangerous if not used properly. Ingesting a teaspoon of any normal oil used in food (olive, coconut, canola, etc.) is not going to harm the body. Ingesting the same amount of an essential oil could have serious consequences. When used in the process of making cosmetics such as soaps, only a small amount of oil is needed for scent.

    Other anecdotal accounts from the first page suggest that essential oils can indeed have beneficial effects on the body.

  • jofjltncb6jofjltncb6 Member Posts: 34,956 Member Member Posts: 34,956 Member
    Ingesting? Dermal? Enema?

    Why do you keep conflating the delivery method? They're not synonymous.
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,424 Member Member Posts: 24,424 Member
    I took this out of the book I have on essential oils. Not sure if the rest of you believe it, but I think it could easily explain what happened the particular instance when I rubbed an excessive amount of oil on my skin. Notice the first section at the top and what it says about putting more. xigwhzeipjyr.jpg

    But nothing there says it goes to your colon.
    Do you really think 1-3 drops of something rubbed on your feet detoxes your body?
    While not the colon itself, the article I posted mentioned the oil relaxing the smooth muscle surrounding the colon. That has implications for IBS (although as you mentioned they were referring to injesting the oil instead of using it topically).

    Do I think that simply rubbing a few drops of a random oil on the feet can have any kind of detoxification properties? No. While I don't think essential oils are necessarily a magic cure for health issues, I can tell you that they are extremely potent and can be dangerous if not used properly. Ingesting a teaspoon of any normal oil used in food (olive, coconut, canola, etc.) is not going to harm the body. Ingesting the same amount of an essential oil could have serious consequences. When used in the process of making cosmetics such as soaps, only a small amount of oil is needed for scent.

    Other anecdotal accounts from the first page suggest that essential oils can indeed have beneficial effects on the body.

    Good luck.

    Managing a difficult disease will have people reaching out for seemingly borderline treatments that may or may not work - just make sure that the energy you use to work out this type of treatment isn't lost to more effective clinical treatments - if you suffer from IBS, work with a doctor to see if some of the traditional elimination diets don't help first.

    Also, if you want to follow the treatment that seemed effective - it's the oral treatment of the enteric coated pills you want to look into.
    edited May 2016
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,424 Member Member Posts: 24,424 Member
    double post.
    edited May 2016
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    Detoxes your body of what exactly?

    Foot odor, maybe?
  • positivepowerspositivepowers Member Posts: 902 Member Member Posts: 902 Member
    emdeesea wrote: »
    I'm very skeptical and think it runs more along the lines of placebo effect - if you think it's going to work, then it will.

    That said, occasionally when I visit the massage therapist she uses a mint oil on the scalp which is very soothing. But I don't believe that it's actually doing anything other than what it's meant for, which is to just be a refreshing scrub. I don't get into magical thinking myself.

    That's interesting that you think that because massage therapy is also an alternative treatment.

    OP, if EO works for you, use it.
  • Rocknut53Rocknut53 Member Posts: 1,798 Member Member Posts: 1,798 Member
    I am new to the E.O. world, and came into not really having no opinion about them either way. I do use oils, but I do not believe that modern medicine should be tossed out the window. I just took a trip to the doctor a couple of weeks ago, in fact, for a nasty cough I had going on. However, the more I learn, the more I realize there is a lot of opinions that tend to either fall under full out belief in using them to support your body OR total skeptics believing them to be just another craze. I am curious about what others think about taking a more holistic approach to their health.

    What do you think? Are they just another craze, or do believe their is real science behind them and why? Are they something you have ever incorporated into your life, or do you have no use for them?

    I like some EO's for the smell, lavender, orange, etc. Tea tree oil is pretty amazing for minor skin irritations. However, when a friend suggested I use some Doterra oils on my husband's abdominal incision to prevent infection after he had just spent 12 days in ICU for a ruptured colon I was dumbfounded. Parts of his incision were left open to allow drainage and such and to suggest I put a questionable substance on it was just irresponsible on her part. I know she was just trying to make a buck promoting the products, but a little common sense in this case would have been nice.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,583 Member Member Posts: 2,583 Member
    I took this out of the book I have on essential oils. Not sure if the rest of you believe it, but I think it could easily explain what happened the particular instance when I rubbed an excessive amount of oil on my skin. Notice the first section at the top and what it says about putting more. xigwhzeipjyr.jpg

    But nothing there says it goes to your colon.
    Do you really think 1-3 drops of something rubbed on your feet detoxes your body?
    While not the colon itself, the article I posted mentioned the oil relaxing the smooth muscle surrounding the colon. That has implications for IBS (although as you mentioned they were referring to injesting the oil instead of using it topically).

    Do I think that simply rubbing a few drops of a random oil on the feet can have any kind of detoxification properties? No. While I don't think essential oils are necessarily a magic cure for health issues, I can tell you that they are extremely potent and can be dangerous if not used properly. Ingesting a teaspoon of any normal oil used in food (olive, coconut, canola, etc.) is not going to harm the body. Ingesting the same amount of an essential oil could have serious consequences. When used in the process of making cosmetics such as soaps, only a small amount of oil is needed for scent.

    Other anecdotal accounts from the first page suggest that essential oils can indeed have beneficial effects on the body.

    Good luck.

    Managing a difficult disease will have people reaching out for seemingly borderline treatments that may or may not work - just make sure that the energy you use to work out this type of treatment isn't lost to more effective clinical treatments - if you suffer from IBS, work with a doctor to see if some of the traditional elimination diets don't help first.

    Also, if you want to follow the treatment that seemed effective - it's the oral treatment of the enteric coated pills you want to look into.
    Right, and there are other things (such as moderating intake of certain foods or ingredients) that I think do work better for me.

  • singingfluteladysingingflutelady Member Posts: 8,697 Member Member Posts: 8,697 Member
    @EvgeniZyntx so peppermint oil on the belly as a cure for Crohn's is probably a no go? I shouldn't go off my biologic and other meds and get oil instead? ;)
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,424 Member Member Posts: 24,424 Member
    @EvgeniZyntx so peppermint oil on the belly as a cure for Crohn's is probably a no go? I shouldn't go off my biologic and other meds and get oil instead? ;)

    Well... a nice massage is a nice massage. Nothing wrong with that. ;)

    Full disclosure - the company I worked for prior makes one of the current primary treatments for Crohn's. So take what I say with that in mind. diet and meds. diet and meds.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,583 Member Member Posts: 2,583 Member
    I also think it's worth noting that as far as I can tell, no one in this thread is suggesting that essential oils can serve as a magical cure for serious diseases. Helping a disease by reducing the severity of symptoms is one thing, getting rid of the disease altogether is completely different. I don't believe anyone here is claiming that essential oils can do the latter. I tend to think the reasoning behind which some people/sources suggest using essential oils for is being taken out of context.
  • Panda_PoptartsPanda_Poptarts Member Posts: 971 Member Member Posts: 971 Member
    I used eucalyptus with my asthmatic child with much success. We also used tea tree oil for cleaning cloth diapers and treating rashes, and gentian violet (not exactly an EO, but a plant extract) for yeast and thrush. I still keep eucalyptus around! I've also got some raspberry oil being shipped for use as sunblock after some rather nasty sunblock reactions.
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