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Essential Oils

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  • CorneliusPhotonCorneliusPhoton Member Posts: 965 Member Member Posts: 965 Member
    Ok Bit the bullet...
    auddii wrote: »

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    We know without debate that some chemicals can and do enter your bloodstream through topical application. This is how we can use nicotine patches, birth control/other hormone patches, pain relief patches. Skin is an organ. This is why everybody on earth has triclosan in their bodies. Phthalates, parabens, nanoparticles, hormone disruptors...When you apply personal care products to your skin, many of their constituents appear in your bloodstream. http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/
  • CatchMom11CatchMom11 Member, Premium Posts: 451 Member Member, Premium Posts: 451 Member
    I myself use EOs, but there are always going to be things that require modern medicine. For muscle aches I use a muscle cream made from Valor, Panaway Oil, Peppermint and Coconut Oil and it works just as well if not better than Biofreeze. The same for headaches, I can manage my headaches with EO's but for migraines, I do still rely on my prescription. I do diffuse EOs in my house rather than using air fresheners which are nothing but chemicals. I also have replaced my dryer sheets by making my own dryer balls, replaced my household cleaners by making my own cleaning wipe and cleaning sprays.

    So yes, EOs are very beneficial, but there are still lots of things that I rely on Modern Medicine or Science for.
  • auddiiauddii Member Posts: 15,410 Member Member Posts: 15,410 Member
    Ok Bit the bullet...
    auddii wrote: »

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    We know without debate that some chemicals can and do enter your bloodstream through topical application. This is how we can use nicotine patches, birth control/other hormone patches, pain relief patches. Skin is an organ. This is why everybody on earth has triclosan in their bodies. Phthalates, parabens, nanoparticles, hormone disruptors...When you apply personal care products to your skin, many of their constituents appear in your bloodstream. http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/

    But those drugs are not suspended in oil, and are often combined with carrier compounds specifically designed to pass through the skin.

    Are you suggesting that essential oils are also designed as such?
  • WeepingAngel81WeepingAngel81 Member Posts: 2,272 Member Member Posts: 2,272 Member
    MandaB9780 wrote: »
    I myself use EOs, but there are always going to be things that require modern medicine. For muscle aches I use a muscle cream made from Valor, Panaway Oil, Peppermint and Coconut Oil and it works just as well if not better than Biofreeze. The same for headaches, I can manage my headaches with EO's but for migraines, I do still rely on my prescription. I do diffuse EOs in my house rather than using air fresheners which are nothing but chemicals. I also have replaced my dryer sheets by making my own dryer balls, replaced my household cleaners by making my own cleaning wipe and cleaning sprays.

    So yes, EOs are very beneficial, but there are still lots of things that I rely on Modern Medicine or Science for.

    This is pretty much where I am at as well. I am not a total believer, but not a complete skeptic either. I have a blend that is similar to vapor rub that I like to use when my allergies are crazy, but I wouldn't toss out my inhaler either. I don't think they are going to cure diseases, but I'm not opposed to using them as a first step for things like headaches, ear aches, etc. My doctor won't see anyone until they have had their minor symptoms for a few days anyway, so I have no problem trying to go another route, and if it doesn't work, I'm not really out anything since I will be seeing the doc anyway. If it does work, then I have saved myself a copay.
  • CorneliusPhotonCorneliusPhoton Member Posts: 965 Member Member Posts: 965 Member
    Speaking about transdermal absorption, I was once prescribed hormones via shooting (thank you _Waffle_) them into my coochie because they were more effectively delivered to the bloodstream than going through the whole digestive system. I think that using any of the... "insertable" drug bullets (enemas?) are the same as trans-dermal delivery, just a faster route to the bloodstream than the external skin.
  • 100df100df Member Posts: 668 Member Member Posts: 668 Member
    I skeptical because of potency. There's a reason drugs are monitored by the FDA. The essential oils are only allowed or can only be so potent. Not nearly the potency of drugs.

    Am I thinking correctly about it?
  • auddiiauddii Member Posts: 15,410 Member Member Posts: 15,410 Member
    Speaking about transdermal absorption, I was once prescribed hormones via shooting (thank you _Waffle_) them into my coochie because they were more effectively delivered to the bloodstream than going through the whole digestive system. I think that using any of the... "insertable" drug bullets (enemas?) are the same as trans-dermal delivery, just a faster route to the bloodstream than the external skin.

    Well, you also put nitro tabs under your tongue because it's one of the fastest ways to get it into the blood stream.

    And when a dog is overheated, you swab the pads of their feet with alcohol because it's one of the fastest ways to bring down their core temperature (because blood vessels are closest to the surface of the skin there).


    Still doesn't mean that rubbing peppermint oil on your stomach is going to lead to whatever "active ingredient supposed to relieve IBS symptoms" pass through the skin, fat, interabdominal space, and target the colon.

    I just don't see that happening.

    Ever.
  • CorneliusPhotonCorneliusPhoton Member Posts: 965 Member Member Posts: 965 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Ok Bit the bullet...
    auddii wrote: »

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    We know without debate that some chemicals can and do enter your bloodstream through topical application. This is how we can use nicotine patches, birth control/other hormone patches, pain relief patches. Skin is an organ. This is why everybody on earth has triclosan in their bodies. Phthalates, parabens, nanoparticles, hormone disruptors...When you apply personal care products to your skin, many of their constituents appear in your bloodstream. http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/

    But those drugs are not suspended in oil, and are often combined with carrier compounds specifically designed to pass through the skin.

    Are you suggesting that essential oils are also designed as such?

    I am only suggesting that many modern medicines come from plants, and that some plant-based remedies may have some beneficial use. I can't prove that they do, and you can't prove that they don't in every case. I am just suggesting that the answer is not definitive until somebody coughs up enough money to do all of the studies.
  • CorneliusPhotonCorneliusPhoton Member Posts: 965 Member Member Posts: 965 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Speaking about transdermal absorption, I was once prescribed hormones via shooting (thank you _Waffle_) them into my coochie because they were more effectively delivered to the bloodstream than going through the whole digestive system. I think that using any of the... "insertable" drug bullets (enemas?) are the same as trans-dermal delivery, just a faster route to the bloodstream than the external skin.

    Well, you also put nitro tabs under your tongue because it's one of the fastest ways to get it into the blood stream.

    And when a dog is overheated, you swab the pads of their feet with alcohol because it's one of the fastest ways to bring down their core temperature (because blood vessels are closest to the surface of the skin there).


    Still doesn't mean that rubbing peppermint oil on your stomach is going to lead to whatever "active ingredient supposed to relieve IBS symptoms" pass through the skin, fat, interabdominal space, and target the colon.

    I just don't see that happening.

    Ever.

    Ok...?
    Under the tongue is also transdermal.

    I am specifically responding to these claims: "Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that... Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream." That is an incorrect statement. I have no dog in the peppermint oil drama.
    edited May 2016
  • jjpaviojjpavio Member Posts: 24 Member Member Posts: 24 Member
    I used Tea Tree oil to help clear up a nasty skin infection that wasn't responding well to antibiotics alone. The two combined proved to be very effective. I did do research before trying the oil, however, and found there is quite a bit of scientific evidence that Tea Tree oil has proven antibacterial and anti-fungal properties. My teenage daughter uses it diluted with water to dab on acne. It does a nice job of clearing it up. I would be really leery of ingesting any of them, as they aren't regulated and who knows if any given bottle contains what it purports to have in the ingredients. I do add a couple of drops of EO to a diffuser because it smells nice and I like it much better than the overpowering smell of chemical air fresheners. I don't know if the oils really have calming or invigorating properties, but I do believe in the power of suggestion/placebo effect. If I put an EO blend meant to be relaxing in the diffuser, and tell everyone it's meant to be relaxing, then I find the family is more inclined to sit down and relax.
  • auddiiauddii Member Posts: 15,410 Member Member Posts: 15,410 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Ok Bit the bullet...
    auddii wrote: »

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    We know without debate that some chemicals can and do enter your bloodstream through topical application. This is how we can use nicotine patches, birth control/other hormone patches, pain relief patches. Skin is an organ. This is why everybody on earth has triclosan in their bodies. Phthalates, parabens, nanoparticles, hormone disruptors...When you apply personal care products to your skin, many of their constituents appear in your bloodstream. http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/

    But those drugs are not suspended in oil, and are often combined with carrier compounds specifically designed to pass through the skin.

    Are you suggesting that essential oils are also designed as such?

    I am only suggesting that many modern medicines come from plants, and that some plant-based remedies may have some beneficial use. I can't prove that they do, and you can't prove that they don't in every case. I am just suggesting that the answer is not definitive until somebody coughs up enough money to do all of the studies.

    And many modern medicines are actually found to be completely ineffective after extensive use and testing.

    Without proof, I'd think people are mostly wasting money. I would think most essential oils are not effective when rubbed on the skin. I'm sure there are plenty of people who suggest ingesting them, but since the FDA does not regulated supplements, I would not recommend that, especially since many MLM type people are selling products that are not of a grade to be ingested.

    And I'm not opposed to alternative medicines as a supplement to modern medicine. I would imagine a lot of it is placebo effect. Lots of different herbs have been long known to have actual affects. But I believe a large portion of what is being claimed by essential oils is supposition and random statements used to sell products.

    And personally, I think the environment and culture rapidly rising about embracing anything "natural" is better is have a huge detriment to the health of those people (especially with regards to people choosing to not use modern medicine to treat their sick children) is incredibly dangerous.
  • CorneliusPhotonCorneliusPhoton Member Posts: 965 Member Member Posts: 965 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    Ok Bit the bullet...
    auddii wrote: »

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    We know without debate that some chemicals can and do enter your bloodstream through topical application. This is how we can use nicotine patches, birth control/other hormone patches, pain relief patches. Skin is an organ. This is why everybody on earth has triclosan in their bodies. Phthalates, parabens, nanoparticles, hormone disruptors...When you apply personal care products to your skin, many of their constituents appear in your bloodstream. http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/

    But those drugs are not suspended in oil, and are often combined with carrier compounds specifically designed to pass through the skin.

    Are you suggesting that essential oils are also designed as such?

    I am only suggesting that many modern medicines come from plants, and that some plant-based remedies may have some beneficial use. I can't prove that they do, and you can't prove that they don't in every case. I am just suggesting that the answer is not definitive until somebody coughs up enough money to do all of the studies.

    And many modern medicines are actually found to be completely ineffective after extensive use and testing.

    Without proof, I'd think people are mostly wasting money. I would think most essential oils are not effective when rubbed on the skin. I'm sure there are plenty of people who suggest ingesting them, but since the FDA does not regulated supplements, I would not recommend that, especially since many MLM type people are selling products that are not of a grade to be ingested.

    And I'm not opposed to alternative medicines as a supplement to modern medicine. I would imagine a lot of it is placebo effect. Lots of different herbs have been long known to have actual affects. But I believe a large portion of what is being claimed by essential oils is supposition and random statements used to sell products.

    And personally, I think the environment and culture rapidly rising about embracing anything "natural" is better is have a huge detriment to the health of those people (especially with regards to people choosing to not use modern medicine to treat their sick children) is incredibly dangerous.

    Agree 100%.
  • tlflag1620tlflag1620 Member Posts: 1,358 Member Member Posts: 1,358 Member
    I tend to think EOs benefit people mostly via the placebo effect (with a few exceptions - tea tree oil for instance). But if it makes you feel better, it makes you feel better; doesn't much matter to me how or why. The issues I am concerned about are when these types of "holistic remedies" delay or worse yet, take the place of, actual medical care, especially wrt young children who cannot tell their quacktastic parents to put down the thieves oil and take them to the hospital post-haste. Or when they are used incorrectly, as some of them can have side effects if used in high enough quantities or if taken using the wrong method (orally vs rectally vs topically). I tend to see them as woo, but that doesn't mean they are completely inert substances. The main problem is they aren't regulated and there isn't much in the way of quality control. Some of them smell pretty, but that's really the only positive thing I have to say about them.
  • JaneSnoweJaneSnowe Member Posts: 1,282 Member Member Posts: 1,282 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Ok Bit the bullet...
    auddii wrote: »

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    We know without debate that some chemicals can and do enter your bloodstream through topical application. This is how we can use nicotine patches, birth control/other hormone patches, pain relief patches. Skin is an organ. This is why everybody on earth has triclosan in their bodies. Phthalates, parabens, nanoparticles, hormone disruptors...When you apply personal care products to your skin, many of their constituents appear in your bloodstream. http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/

    But those drugs are not suspended in oil, and are often combined with carrier compounds specifically designed to pass through the skin.

    Are you suggesting that essential oils are also designed as such?

    I am only suggesting that many modern medicines come from plants, and that some plant-based remedies may have some beneficial use. I can't prove that they do, and you can't prove that they don't in every case. I am just suggesting that the answer is not definitive until somebody coughs up enough money to do all of the studies.

    I know you said you don't have a dog in this fight, but for anyone else reading this thread: Essential oils bring in billions of dollars annually. Why do you suppose the companies selling them haven't coughed up money to do accurate studies? Think about it.
    edited May 2016
  • tlflag1620tlflag1620 Member Posts: 1,358 Member Member Posts: 1,358 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Ok Bit the bullet...
    auddii wrote: »

    Anything applied topically has a difficult time getting into the blood stream. That's actually the purpose of skin; it acts as a barrier for all the things we are exposed to in daily life. Evolution works wonders on that.

    Absorbing deep into the skin means it goes "deep" into a thin layer; it does not enter the blood stream.

    And claims that essential oils or carrier oils can is just hype to sell their products.

    We know without debate that some chemicals can and do enter your bloodstream through topical application. This is how we can use nicotine patches, birth control/other hormone patches, pain relief patches. Skin is an organ. This is why everybody on earth has triclosan in their bodies. Phthalates, parabens, nanoparticles, hormone disruptors...When you apply personal care products to your skin, many of their constituents appear in your bloodstream. http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/

    But those drugs are not suspended in oil, and are often combined with carrier compounds specifically designed to pass through the skin.

    Are you suggesting that essential oils are also designed as such?

    I am only suggesting that many modern medicines come from plants, and that some plant-based remedies may have some beneficial use. I can't prove that they do, and you can't prove that they don't in every case. I am just suggesting that the answer is not definitive until somebody coughs up enough money to do all of the studies.

    I know you said you don't have a dog in this fight, but for anyone else reading this thread: Essential oils bring in billions of dollars annually. Why do you suppose the companies selling them haven't coughed up money to do accurate studies? Think about it.

    This. We've been using "essential oils" as medicine for thousands upon thousands of years. If they really worked worth a damn, we never would have felt the need to invent actual medicine.

  • Machka9Machka9 Member Posts: 16,846 Member Member Posts: 16,846 Member
    jjpavio wrote: »
    I used Tea Tree oil to help clear up a nasty skin infection that wasn't responding well to antibiotics alone. The two combined proved to be very effective. I did do research before trying the oil, however, and found there is quite a bit of scientific evidence that Tea Tree oil has proven antibacterial and anti-fungal properties. My teenage daughter uses it diluted with water to dab on acne. It does a nice job of clearing it up.

    Tea Tree oil is fairly popular here in Australia ... and that is another one I've used. Supposed to be good for minor cuts and things like that ... probably because of the antibacterial properties.

  • butterfli7obutterfli7o Member Posts: 1,315 Member Member Posts: 1,315 Member
    To the original poster, nice username :p Must be a Whovian.
    Personally, EO's have done nothing for me. But I have friends who swear by them.
  • snikkinssnikkins Member Posts: 1,282 Member Member Posts: 1,282 Member
    tlflag1620 wrote: »
    I tend to think EOs benefit people mostly via the placebo effect (with a few exceptions - tea tree oil for instance). But if it makes you feel better, it makes you feel better; doesn't much matter to me how or why. The issues I am concerned about are when these types of "holistic remedies" delay or worse yet, take the place of, actual medical care, especially wrt young children who cannot tell their quacktastic parents to put down the thieves oil and take them to the hospital post-haste. Or when they are used incorrectly, as some of them can have side effects if used in high enough quantities or if taken using the wrong method (orally vs rectally vs topically). I tend to see them as woo, but that doesn't mean they are completely inert substances. The main problem is they aren't regulated and there isn't much in the way of quality control. Some of them smell pretty, but that's really the only positive thing I have to say about them.

    To add to this, people also don't believe that these compounds can interfere with medicines and as such, won't inform their doctors about it.

    But hey, it's all natural so it cannot be harmful!
  • zyxstzyxst Member Posts: 9,126 Member Member Posts: 9,126 Member
    tlflag1620 wrote: »
    I tend to think EOs benefit people mostly via the placebo effect (with a few exceptions - tea tree oil for instance). But if it makes you feel better, it makes you feel better; doesn't much matter to me how or why. The issues I am concerned about are when these types of "holistic remedies" delay or worse yet, take the place of, actual medical care, especially wrt young children who cannot tell their quacktastic parents to put down the thieves oil and take them to the hospital post-haste. Or when they are used incorrectly, as some of them can have side effects if used in high enough quantities or if taken using the wrong method (orally vs rectally vs topically). I tend to see them as woo, but that doesn't mean they are completely inert substances. The main problem is they aren't regulated and there isn't much in the way of quality control. Some of them smell pretty, but that's really the only positive thing I have to say about them.

    +1
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,582 Member Member Posts: 2,582 Member
    auddii wrote: »
    Speaking about transdermal absorption, I was once prescribed hormones via shooting (thank you _Waffle_) them into my coochie because they were more effectively delivered to the bloodstream than going through the whole digestive system. I think that using any of the... "insertable" drug bullets (enemas?) are the same as trans-dermal delivery, just a faster route to the bloodstream than the external skin.
    Still doesn't mean that rubbing peppermint oil on your stomach is going to lead to whatever "active ingredient supposed to relieve IBS symptoms" pass through the skin, fat, interabdominal space, and target the colon.

    I just don't see that happening.

    Ever.
    But what about simply relaxing the muscle? I could be wrong, but I thought that could have implications for how severe some people may perceive abdominal discomfort from IBS. That's just simply the oil being absorbed into the skin (not any further).
    I'm saying that because (to my knowledge) that is a reasonable explanation for how rubbing essential oils on the skin can help certain health issues like IBS.

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