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The repackaging of the diet and fitness industry

2

Replies

  • SueInAz
    SueInAz Posts: 6,585 Member
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    gothchiq wrote: »
    lol, I know. Women's magazines are the absolute worst for this. I just go with what my doctor tells me, log calories on here, and work out, and completely ignore the fads. When it gets a little cooler outside I can get back to hooping as part of my workout. Very strengthening for the middle and much more fun than just doing planks. Today, I think it's gonna be yoga.

    I look at it like this; if any of those plans or gimmicks they advertise really worked as claimed, no one would be fat.

    I agree. I've read them for years and only TWICE in recent history did I see any mention of a food scale. One article just used it as a prop in the picture. The other article listed it under "crazy diet gadgets" then added the disclaimer that it "may be helpful but obviously isn't something you'd use for life". Really??? I just shake my head and turn the page.

    Yesterday one of the articles was titled "Forget calorie counting. Just eat more colorful food!" Yes, adding variety is good particularly if it's brightly colored vegetables, but I'm convinced the women's magazines are contributing to the obesity epidemic because it keeps them in business.

    They wouldn't sell magazines if every week they had the same diet plan of "eat less calories than you burn", now would they? My favorites are the ones who show you a picture of a pretty young woman in a bikini who supposedly lost over 100 pounds and doesn't have one bit of loose skin or stretch marks. How long ago did she lose that 100 pounds, if she actually did?
  • CincyNeid
    CincyNeid Posts: 1,250 Member
    d4_54 wrote: »
    Gravel grinding is new to me. And it's working out very well for me. I know people have been doing this in one form or another for more than 100 years but the combination of hydraulic discs, carbon frame, drop bars, and acceptably fat tires is worth all the hype. It's really wonderful not to have to turn around just because the pavement ended.

    CX_Wheel_Main_Action_2-800x532.jpg

    Can you help me with advice what I should be looking for in a decent off road bike. There are so many and I do not know what to look for in regards to bike features.

    Thanks

    Depends on what you want. Cyclocross, Gravel Grinding, Cross Country, All Mountain .....

    What is you're intentions on doing with the bike. Personally I like "Cross Country" style riding. Hard Tail [No rear suspension], aggressive riding position.....

    As far as brands go... go your local Bike Shop and ask around. And get properly fitted. As long as it's a good name brand you should be fine with any one of their bikes.
  • Return2Fit
    Return2Fit Posts: 226 Member
    The last month I've been getting a lot of "You've lost a LOT of weight, what have you been doing?" When I respond "Counting calories," their eyes glaze over and they often mumble that they can't (or won't) do that.

    Okay then.
    YEP
    I get questioned by most everybody I meet who desire whatever "secret" I have discovered.
    Nobody wants to hear about intense effort, discipline or sacrifice.
    That doesn't sell...
    vm38d8pe7ezl.jpg
  • d4_54
    d4_54 Posts: 62 Member
    CincyNeid wrote: »
    d4_54 wrote: »
    Gravel grinding is new to me. And it's working out very well for me. I know people have been doing this in one form or another for more than 100 years but the combination of hydraulic discs, carbon frame, drop bars, and acceptably fat tires is worth all the hype. It's really wonderful not to have to turn around just because the pavement ended.

    CX_Wheel_Main_Action_2-800x532.jpg

    Can you help me with advice what I should be looking for in a decent off road bike. There are so many and I do not know what to look for in regards to bike features.

    Thanks

    Depends on what you want. Cyclocross, Gravel Grinding, Cross Country, All Mountain .....

    What is you're intentions on doing with the bike. Personally I like "Cross Country" style riding. Hard Tail [No rear suspension], aggressive riding position.....

    As far as brands go... go your local Bike Shop and ask around. And get properly fitted. As long as it's a good name brand you should be fine with any one of their bikes.

    I am so lost. I don't no what I want it for other then I can't take my road bike on grass. I saw one yesterday with big fat wheels. Like the bat bike.lol
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,257 Member
    d4_54 wrote: »
    CincyNeid wrote: »
    d4_54 wrote: »
    Gravel grinding is new to me. And it's working out very well for me. I know people have been doing this in one form or another for more than 100 years but the combination of hydraulic discs, carbon frame, drop bars, and acceptably fat tires is worth all the hype. It's really wonderful not to have to turn around just because the pavement ended.

    CX_Wheel_Main_Action_2-800x532.jpg

    Can you help me with advice what I should be looking for in a decent off road bike. There are so many and I do not know what to look for in regards to bike features.

    Thanks

    Depends on what you want. Cyclocross, Gravel Grinding, Cross Country, All Mountain .....

    What is you're intentions on doing with the bike. Personally I like "Cross Country" style riding. Hard Tail [No rear suspension], aggressive riding position.....

    As far as brands go... go your local Bike Shop and ask around. And get properly fitted. As long as it's a good name brand you should be fine with any one of their bikes.

    I am so lost. I don't no what I want it for other then I can't take my road bike on grass. I saw one yesterday with big fat wheels. Like the bat bike.lol

    A good bike shop will allow you to test ride as you find the perfect bike for you. Everyone has their brand loyalty, but it all comes down to what your goals and preferences are.
  • The_Enginerd
    The_Enginerd Posts: 3,973 Member
    The last month I've been getting a lot of "You've lost a LOT of weight, what have you been doing?" When I respond "Counting calories," their eyes glaze over and they often mumble that they can't (or won't) do that.

    Okay then.
    It feels about like this...

  • jillybeansalad
    jillybeansalad Posts: 239 Member
    edited August 2016
    1,000 years ago, tehre wasn't even a concept of temperature, let alone calories to go in or out.
    There also wasn't chemical additives, yet all the processed food peopel here want to insist they're fine.

    Nor was there medication, vaccines, and refrigeration. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  • jdhcm2006
    jdhcm2006 Posts: 2,295 Member
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    gothchiq wrote: »
    lol, I know. Women's magazines are the absolute worst for this. I just go with what my doctor tells me, log calories on here, and work out, and completely ignore the fads. When it gets a little cooler outside I can get back to hooping as part of my workout. Very strengthening for the middle and much more fun than just doing planks. Today, I think it's gonna be yoga.

    I look at it like this; if any of those plans or gimmicks they advertise really worked as claimed, no one would be fat.

    I agree. I've read them for years and only TWICE in recent history did I see any mention of a food scale. One article just used it as a prop in the picture. The other article listed it under "crazy diet gadgets" then added the disclaimer that it "may be helpful but obviously isn't something you'd use for life". Really??? I just shake my head and turn the page.

    Yesterday one of the articles was titled "Forget calorie counting. Just eat more colorful food!" Yes, adding variety is good particularly if it's brightly colored vegetables, but I'm convinced the women's magazines are contributing to the obesity epidemic because it keeps them in business.

    So much truth in the bolded. It's because they don't want people to lose weight and/or keep it off. If people stay on the cycle of losing and gaining they keep making money. It's why gyms love New Years Resolutioners, most will show for a few weeks to months, never go back but forget to cancel their membership. They keep making money off of people who don't show and who aren't adding wear and tear to the merchandise.

    So it's not just women's mags, it's the entire fitness/diet industry.
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,360 Member
    jdhcm2006 wrote: »
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    gothchiq wrote: »
    lol, I know. Women's magazines are the absolute worst for this. I just go with what my doctor tells me, log calories on here, and work out, and completely ignore the fads. When it gets a little cooler outside I can get back to hooping as part of my workout. Very strengthening for the middle and much more fun than just doing planks. Today, I think it's gonna be yoga.

    I look at it like this; if any of those plans or gimmicks they advertise really worked as claimed, no one would be fat.

    I agree. I've read them for years and only TWICE in recent history did I see any mention of a food scale. One article just used it as a prop in the picture. The other article listed it under "crazy diet gadgets" then added the disclaimer that it "may be helpful but obviously isn't something you'd use for life". Really??? I just shake my head and turn the page.

    Yesterday one of the articles was titled "Forget calorie counting. Just eat more colorful food!" Yes, adding variety is good particularly if it's brightly colored vegetables, but I'm convinced the women's magazines are contributing to the obesity epidemic because it keeps them in business.

    So much truth in the bolded. It's because they don't want people to lose weight and/or keep it off. If people stay on the cycle of losing and gaining they keep making money. It's why gyms love New Years Resolutioners, most will show for a few weeks to months, never go back but forget to cancel their membership. They keep making money off of people who don't show and who aren't adding wear and tear to the merchandise.

    So it's not just women's mags, it's the entire fitness/diet industry.

    The vast majority of the fitness/diet industry is geared toward making money off of uneducated, gullible people. It's a multi-billion dollar industry based upon fraud and woo. Just saying "create a caloric deficit to lose weight" won't make them billions of dollars like "blast the fat, lose weight quick!" plans will. There will always be people who are looking for the magic pill/potion and would rather spend hundreds/thousands of dollars trying every imaginable bit of woo out there rather than buckling down and getting to work on it. Self-discipline, hard work and sweat is so icky, much better to sit on the couch and take a magic pill every day and watch that fat just melt off your body!
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    jdhcm2006 wrote: »
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    gothchiq wrote: »
    lol, I know. Women's magazines are the absolute worst for this. I just go with what my doctor tells me, log calories on here, and work out, and completely ignore the fads. When it gets a little cooler outside I can get back to hooping as part of my workout. Very strengthening for the middle and much more fun than just doing planks. Today, I think it's gonna be yoga.

    I look at it like this; if any of those plans or gimmicks they advertise really worked as claimed, no one would be fat.

    I agree. I've read them for years and only TWICE in recent history did I see any mention of a food scale. One article just used it as a prop in the picture. The other article listed it under "crazy diet gadgets" then added the disclaimer that it "may be helpful but obviously isn't something you'd use for life". Really??? I just shake my head and turn the page.

    Yesterday one of the articles was titled "Forget calorie counting. Just eat more colorful food!" Yes, adding variety is good particularly if it's brightly colored vegetables, but I'm convinced the women's magazines are contributing to the obesity epidemic because it keeps them in business.

    So much truth in the bolded. It's because they don't want people to lose weight and/or keep it off. If people stay on the cycle of losing and gaining they keep making money. It's why gyms love New Years Resolutioners, most will show for a few weeks to months, never go back but forget to cancel their membership. They keep making money off of people who don't show and who aren't adding wear and tear to the merchandise.

    So it's not just women's mags, it's the entire fitness/diet industry.

    The vast majority of the fitness/diet industry is geared toward making money off of uneducated, gullible people. It's a multi-billion dollar industry based upon fraud and woo. Just saying "create a caloric deficit to lose weight" won't make them billions of dollars like "blast the fat, lose weight quick!" plans will. There will always be people who are looking for the magic pill/potion and would rather spend hundreds/thousands of dollars trying every imaginable bit of woo out there rather than buckling down and getting to work on it. Self-discipline, hard work and sweat is so icky, much better to sit on the couch and take a magic pill every day and watch that fat just melt off your body!

    There is a lot of truth in that but it's also a bit unfair. A lot of people are willing to put in the work. In fact, a whole lot of people do put in the work. They sweat, they stick to reduced calories, they do it. They lose weight. The real problem isn't always a lack of effort or will or the desire to take a magic pill. Often it's just total lack of understanding that once you are at that lower weight you can't eat the way you used to and stay there. Most will always need to eat fewer calories than when they were overweight. It's a failure to maintain. That's the part the diet industry doesn't talk about. That's the part they don't want us to know. Because if we regain, we will run back to them to do it again. We begin to think we can't do it without them.
  • MissDi321
    MissDi321 Posts: 87 Member
    Finding for myself anyway, that it's a change in lifestyle from unhealthy to healthy--some of it has to do with liking oneself and caring for self enough to change. I have done the "unhealthy" and have lost weight but never kept it off. I have wrecked havoc with my body. I am nearly 63 and finally waking up to the fact that if I want to live to be a ripe old age, I have to change my lifestyle. So I am here. I am logging food, exercising at least what I can as I start getting back into shape. All those fads, eating disorder, not worth it when it comes down to it. Young folks--stay healthy, keep on track and get help if you need it.
    Just my thoughts
    Di
  • BillMcKay1
    BillMcKay1 Posts: 315 Member
    The last month I've been getting a lot of "You've lost a LOT of weight, what have you been doing?" When I respond "Counting calories," their eyes glaze over and they often mumble that they can't (or won't) do that.

    Okay then.

    Pretty much. After losing 40lbs over the late spring and summer people have started asking me how I did it. Simple answer, eat less, move more and lift heavy things. Track my food intake. Never what they really want to hear.

    Putting on weight is fairly mindless and effortless. I guess people always hope for some way to make losing weight just as easy. Losing weight is simple, but simple isn't the same as easy.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,933 Member
    d4_54 wrote: »
    I am so lost. I don't no what I want it for other then I can't take my road bike on grass. I saw one yesterday with big fat wheels. Like the bat bike.lol

    Depends on a lot of things, so it's more of a conversation than a question. Come visit the exercise and fitness forum!

    With that said, a mountain bike or fat bike might work for you. Fat bikes can be fun because you can ride them in places where no other bikes can go: sand, snow, etc. But they're heavy and the "monster truck tires" giveth and taketh away too. So they're not really ideal except in places bikes aren't generally meant to go. I've rented one and had fun in the snow, might rent one again when the situation warrants it, wouldn't own one personally.

    937b57c579c5f37088a1b4d1a5b06a99.jpg
  • tapwaters
    tapwaters Posts: 428 Member
    jdhcm2006 wrote: »
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    gothchiq wrote: »
    lol, I know. Women's magazines are the absolute worst for this. I just go with what my doctor tells me, log calories on here, and work out, and completely ignore the fads. When it gets a little cooler outside I can get back to hooping as part of my workout. Very strengthening for the middle and much more fun than just doing planks. Today, I think it's gonna be yoga.

    I look at it like this; if any of those plans or gimmicks they advertise really worked as claimed, no one would be fat.

    I agree. I've read them for years and only TWICE in recent history did I see any mention of a food scale. One article just used it as a prop in the picture. The other article listed it under "crazy diet gadgets" then added the disclaimer that it "may be helpful but obviously isn't something you'd use for life". Really??? I just shake my head and turn the page.

    Yesterday one of the articles was titled "Forget calorie counting. Just eat more colorful food!" Yes, adding variety is good particularly if it's brightly colored vegetables, but I'm convinced the women's magazines are contributing to the obesity epidemic because it keeps them in business.

    So much truth in the bolded. It's because they don't want people to lose weight and/or keep it off. If people stay on the cycle of losing and gaining they keep making money. It's why gyms love New Years Resolutioners, most will show for a few weeks to months, never go back but forget to cancel their membership. They keep making money off of people who don't show and who aren't adding wear and tear to the merchandise.

    So it's not just women's mags, it's the entire fitness/diet industry.

    Ehhhh....

    At the root of both of those you have the same common denominator: People looking for an easy way out.

    So is it the industries which capitalize on human nature, or is it human nature itself?
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,933 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Sounds like fun. Sounds expensive too, but many people who enjoy an activity or sport will pay to make it more enjoyable.

    Enve just released a new set of wheels they've spent the year working on. Might as well have put my name on them. This is the only wide, aero wheelset out there. It costs a pretty penny, though.

    When you use the rim as a braking surface, it has to: be shaped for the brake pads, dissipate heat really well, have the right friction characteristics, and be massively strong at the edge to stand up to the clamping force of the brakes. Moving the brake surface to a rotor at the hub removes all of those constraints. Now the shape and carbon makeup can be optimized for aerodynamics and overall wheel strength instead. Plus hookless beads work much better and save weight, right where it counts the most.

    This is pretty revolutionary.

    I have a serious case of the wants.

    4.5AR_Main_2-800x532.jpg

    They come with a pretty liberal 5 year warranty and lifetime crash replacement.
  • Wickedfaery73
    Wickedfaery73 Posts: 184 Member
    The last month I've been getting a lot of "You've lost a LOT of weight, what have you been doing?" When I respond "Counting calories," their eyes glaze over and they often mumble that they can't (or won't) do that.

    Okay then.

    That is exactly what I get! lol
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,336 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Sounds like fun. Sounds expensive too, but many people who enjoy an activity or sport will pay to make it more enjoyable.

    Enve just released a new set of wheels they've spent the year working on. Might as well have put my name on them. This is the only wide, aero wheelset out there. It costs a pretty penny, though.

    When you use the rim as a braking surface, it has to: be shaped for the brake pads, dissipate heat really well, have the right friction characteristics, and be massively strong at the edge to stand up to the clamping force of the brakes. Moving the brake surface to a rotor at the hub removes all of those constraints. Now the shape and carbon makeup can be optimized for aerodynamics and overall wheel strength instead. Plus hookless beads work much better and save weight, right where it counts the most.

    This is pretty revolutionary.

    I have a serious case of the wants.

    4.5AR_Main_2-800x532.jpg

    They come with a pretty liberal 5 year warranty and lifetime crash replacement.
    Wow- $2200-$3500. Is that for just ONE wheel or the set?

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • auddii
    auddii Posts: 15,357 Member
    It's not a riding technique, it's a lot of new equipment being available together. The bicycle segment of the fitness industry is moving away from skinny-tire racing bikes that can't handle unpaved surfaces, to wider, slightly less aerodynamic frames that are more versatile. At the same time, rim brakes are starting to lose their dominance and discs are rapidly becoming more common on road and "all road" bikes. Even hydraulic ones. This is facing some resistance - they're heavier, and people fear that the rotor can break off in a crash and cut somebody - but they work much better in wet or muddy conditions. Not having to use rims as a braking surface opens up new possibilities for aerodynamics and (rotational) weight savings. This combination of really light and strong composites with much more versatile frames and brakes is opening up a new type of "all road" cycling, and not just for races. :smile:

    It's a shame that biking has been limited to roads for so long.

    25thregiment_bicycles.jpg