Space

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  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    Infrared Spotlight on Orion Sword

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    This image composite outlines the region near Orion sword that was surveyed by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope white box. The Orion nebula, our closest massive star-making factory, is the brightest spot near the hunter sword.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
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    This image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft resembles a face staring back at the spacecraft.
  • LittleLionHeart1
    LittleLionHeart1 Posts: 3,655 Member
    cee134 wrote: »
    Stars Adorn Orion Sword

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    This image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows what lies near the sword of the constellation Orion -- an active stellar nursery containing thousands of young stars and developing protostars. Many will turn out like our sun.

    Oooh neat! :)
  • LittleLionHeart1
    LittleLionHeart1 Posts: 3,655 Member
    cee134 wrote: »
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    This image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft resembles a face staring back at the spacecraft.

    This is when I see a nice sushi roll, or a nice bowl of ice cream. I smile just like that. ;)
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    A young star takes centre stage

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    With its helical appearance resembling a snail’s shell, this reflection nebula seems to spiral out from a luminous central star in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image.

    The star in the centre, known as V1331 Cyg and located in the dark cloud LDN 981 — or, more commonly, Lynds 981 — had previously been defined as a T Tauri star. A T Tauri is a young star — or Young Stellar Object — that is starting to contract to become a main sequence star similar to the Sun.

    What makes V1331Cyg special is the fact that we look almost exactly at one of its poles. Usually, the view of a young star is obscured by the dust from the circumstellar disc and the envelope that surround it. However, with V1331Cyg we are actually looking in the exact direction of a jet driven by the star that is clearing the dust and giving us this magnificent view.

    This view provides an almost undisturbed view of the star and its immediate surroundings allowing astronomers to study it in greater detail and look for features that might suggest the formation of a verylow-mass object in the outer circumstellar disc.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    Dusty Dead Star

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    A composite image from NASA Chandra and Spitzer space telescopes shows the dusty remains of a collapsed star, a supernova remnant called G54.1+0.3. The white source at the center is a dead star called a pulsar.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    edited July 2017
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    The Juno spacecraft will begin a historic pass over Jupiter, where it will be brought to under 9,000 kilometres above the heart of the Great Red Spot - humanity's closest ever look at the famous storm!

    NASA's Juno spacecraft will be directly over the spot shortly after 10 p.m. ET on Monday, July 10, about 5,600 miles above the gas giant's cloud tops.

    During the latter part of this historic encounter with Jupiter, the Juno spacecraft will fly directly over the Great Red Spot! Mission planners have predicted that it will be at an altitude of just 9,000 kilometers (5,600 miles) when it passes over the center of the storm. JunoCam will most definitely be on for this pass, along with another essential, the Microwave Radiometer (MWR), which will be making its second performance of the mission, after making its debut during Perijove 4 back in February. This will mean that the spacecraft will be oriented perfectly parallel to the planet, to allow the MWR to take proper data, facing the planet head-on. This is in contrast to how the spacecraft is normally oriented during these passes, with the spacecraft's fixed high-gain antenna being pointed directly at the Earth in order to conduct the Gravity Science experiment, resulting in the spacecraft being slightly at an angle to the planet. Since the high-gain antenna is facing away from the planet, only the lower-gain antennas on the spacecraft can be used for communications during the flyby; unsuitable for the Gravity Science experiment.

    Alrighty, the moment you're waiting for: the numbers. On the day of the flyby, 11 July (or July 10), Jupiter will be 812.6 million kilometers from Earth. This means the time taken from a signal to travel from Earth to the Juno spacecraft will be 45 minutes. For Perijove 7, the operative "Earth time" will be "Spacecraft time" plus 45 minutes.

    The spacecraft's pass over the north pole will occur at ~01:05 UTC spacecraft time on 11 July (~01:50 UTC Earth time). That is roughly 31-and-a-half hours from when this post was made. Closest approach to Jupiter during this historic flyby will occur an hour later, at exactly 01:55 UTC spacecraft time (02:40 UTC Earth time). The altitude of closest approach this time? 3,500 kilometers (2,200 miles). This is the closest predicted altitude ever for the mission so far, though the spacecraft has definitely been closer. The data read an altitude of 3,421 kilometers (2,126 miles) during Perijove 5, which was 1,000 km closer than that had originally anticipated. Nonetheless, the margin of error isn't too great that an accidental deorbit is possible, so you need not worry.

    The speed of the spacecraft is predicted to exceed 209,000 kilometers per hour (130,000 miles per hour), according to Eyes on the Solar System. According to NASA, the traverse from closest approach to the heart of the Great Red Spot will only take 11 minutes and 33 seconds, travelling over 39,771 kilometers (24,713 miles) to get there; the equivalent of just under the circumference of the Earth. Juno will be travelling the distance of one circumnavigation around the Earth in just under 12 minutes. Amazing stuff. The critical phase of Perijove 7 will end when Juno passes over the south pole of Jupiter at ~03:10 UTC spacecraft time (~03:55 UTC Earth time), with the entire phase lasting 2 hours as per usual.
  • BrendanMcGroarty
    BrendanMcGroarty Posts: 945 Member
    I'm sure this is the right place to go for this. Who can tell me the relationship between dimensions 5-10 and the existence of dark matter and dark energy? Don't they both explain the same thing? Are they competing theories?
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    NASA has named some mysterious Jupiter cloud patterns after Morty from 'Rick and Morty"

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    APPARENT DISTURBANCE IN CLOUD PATTERN.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    Here’s every total solar eclipse happening in your lifetime. Is this year your best chance?

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/national/eclipse/?utm_term=.82208760af12

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    On Aug. 21, a total solar eclipse will be visible from the continental United States. It’ll be the first to traverse coast to coast in nearly a century. There will be 69 total solar eclipses visible from somewhere on the planet in the next 100 years, but only a few will be visible from North America.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    Juno and the Great Red Spot (Illustration)

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    This illustration depicts NASA's Juno spacecraft in orbit above Jupiter's Great Red Spot.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
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    Measuring in at 10,159 miles (16,350 kilometers) in width (as of April 3, 2017) Jupiter's Great Red Spot is 1.3 times as wide as Earth.

    This composite image was generated by combining NASA imagery of Earth with an image of Jupiter taken by astronomer Christopher Go.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    edited July 2017
    Jupiter's Great Red Spot Revealed (Closest pictures to date)

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    This enhanced-color image of Jupiter's Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Jason Major using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft. The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 07:10 p.m. PDT (10:10 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its 7th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 8,648 miles (13,917 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    Winds Trigger Pond Growth

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    Mississippi

    Wind is a force to be reckoned with. It can stir up monsoons, carry dust thousands of miles, and sculpt rock into sinuous arches. But sometimes, the effects of wind go unnoticed for years, like when it carves away slowly at the edges of a pond.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    Ijen Volcano, Indonesia

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    West of Gunung Merapi, East Java, Indonesia, is the Ijen volcano, which has a one-kilometer-wide turquoise-colored acidic crater lake. The lake is the site of a labor-intensive sulfur mining operation, in which sulfur-laden baskets are carried by hand from the crater floor.

    The lake is recognized as the largest highly acidic crater lake in the world, with a pH of 0.5.

    The image was acquired 17 September 2008, covers an area of 24 by 39 kilometers, and is located at 8 degrees south, 114.2 degrees east.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    Mars and the Amazing Technicolor Ejecta Blanket

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    This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows the exposed bedrock of an ejecta blanket of an unnamed crater in the Mare Serpentis region of Mars. Ejecta, when exposed, are truly an eye-opening feature, as they reveal the sometimes exotic subsurface, and materials created by impacts (close-up view). This ejecta shares similarities to others found elsewhere on Mars, which are of particular scientific interest for the extent of exposure and diverse colors. (For example, the Hargraves Crater ejecta, in the Nili Fossae trough region, was once considered as a candidate landing site for the next NASA Mars rover 2020.)

    The colors observed in this picture represent different rocks and minerals, now exposed on the surface. Blue in HiRISE infrared color images generally depicts iron-rich minerals, like olivine and pyroxene. Lighter colors, such as yellow, indicate the presence of altered rocks. The possible sources of the ejecta is most likely from two unnamed craters. How do we determine which crater deposited the ejecta? A full-scale image shows numerous linear features that are observed trending in an east-west direction. These linear features indicate the flow direction of the ejecta from its unnamed host crater. Therefore, if we follow them, we find that they emanate from the bottom of the two unnamed craters. If the ejecta had originated from the top crater, then we would expect the linear features at the location of our picture to trend northwest to southeast.
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    Beyond the Borders of a Galaxy

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    The outlying regions around the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, or M83, are highlighted in this composite image from NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the National Science Foundation Very Large Array in New Mexico.
  • MrStabbems
    MrStabbems Posts: 3,110 Member
    @cee134 you da man! thread is awesomely intradasting
  • cee134
    cee134 Posts: 33,711 Member
    Speedster Star Shocks the Galaxy

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    The red arc in this infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope is a giant shock wave, created by a speeding star known as Kappa Cassiopeiae.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,473 Member
    To me it's odd how some people's thought is so finite when it comes to possibility that life beyond our planet exists. Humans are so self centered around just revolves around them most of the time and what their religious beliefs dictate to them. For me, it would be great to just get a bunch of good people from Earth who are resourceful and intelligent and find another livable planet to be on. Away from the politics and ego maniacs we call leaders of countries.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
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    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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