Lose weight = looking older??

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Replies

  • lkpducky
    lkpducky Posts: 15,002 Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    I imagine a good deal of the comes with the individual weight loss plan. I talk to a number of people and find most look more youthful after losing weight, but they also implemented some manner of progressive resistance and gained a good amount of muscle - maintaining the aesthetic ratio.

    How does lifting help how someone's face looks after weight loss?

    All that tensing, straining, and grunting really works the facial muscles and keeps them lifted :) I wish :(

    Cheers, h.

    I do find that my face is more defined when I do a lot of upper body lifting (especially bench press and pushups).
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,885 Member
    edited November 2018
    lkpducky wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    I imagine a good deal of the comes with the individual weight loss plan. I talk to a number of people and find most look more youthful after losing weight, but they also implemented some manner of progressive resistance and gained a good amount of muscle - maintaining the aesthetic ratio.

    How does lifting help how someone's face looks after weight loss?

    All that tensing, straining, and grunting really works the facial muscles and keeps them lifted :) I wish :(

    Cheers, h.

    I do find that my face is more defined when I do a lot of upper body lifting (especially bench press and pushups).

    We were doing downward dogs in yoga the other day and it felt like my face was going to fall off onto the floor. (You know like the tummies in the 'uterus' thread, my face does it- not posting a pic of that!)

    Losing during menopause had me first worrying about the eye wrinkles. I had just accepted those and the naso-labial lines started to deepen. Once they had etched their way into my face, my lips started to wrinkle (can lips lose weight?).

    It can't get any worse I thought. Oh yes it can said my face- my cheeks sunk and my chin weakened.

    Now I am sat with a face that looks like a wrinkled prune needin to poo.

    This is of course all very tongue in cheek.

    It's 10 years (in Jan) since I started menopause and decided to lose weight. At first I looked slightly haggard, then normal, time added all the extras. I have no idea how I would have looked now if I hadn't lost weight.

    Cheers, h.

    I hear what you're saying and share your concerns (as we used to say back in touchy-feely 1970s conciousness-raising groups).

    I said up above that some people's faces tighten up with exercise, so they look younger . . . but I look older, for sure. after weight loss.

    As you say, my face looked better after some time at goal weight than it did at first. But I think I'm holding onto a tiny bit of subcutaneous fat on my face, and that causes some droopy/wrinkly nonsense, especially on either side below my lips - not really a jowl, I dunno what to call it. (If you wanna see it, hop over to the "morning oatmeal" thread - LOL). Even though I'm nearly immune to aesthetic concerns about my appearance, this one annoys me a little.

    I do think I look younger than some people my age who are very inactive, even in the face (if you can ignore the gray hair): Healthier skin, better color, healthier muscle under the skin, and that sort of thing. I also think I "move younger" as a result of being active. Hard to tell how much of the appearance side is genetic, of course.

    I find it puzzling how many people in my age group (63 this week) will go on about one should dye her hair, wear makeup, etc., to look younger, but who eat poorly and too much, plus stay entirely inactive, which drives appearance in the other direction. Their call, of course.

    In my world, the big deal from both weight loss and activity is stuff like health, strength, injury avoidance, balance, and independence . . . especially independence. That's effectively being younger, IMO, look it or not.
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,257 Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    I imagine a good deal of the comes with the individual weight loss plan. I talk to a number of people and find most look more youthful after losing weight, but they also implemented some manner of progressive resistance and gained a good amount of muscle - maintaining the aesthetic ratio.

    How does lifting help how someone's face looks after weight loss?

    I was thinking about the whole person as opposed to just the face. I am also considering the individual outlook and demeanor - the feeling of accomplishment that comes with success and the impact this has on posture, poise, and confidence.

    Ah, gotcha. I do think, that for me, my body looks younger than it used to, and I feel younger than I used to. But man, the area where my cheeks deflated?

    I would also mention hydration as many people counting calories also stay well hydrated and this does wonders for skin cells.

    I've been keeping a beard (which is going white) largely because if I shave it off I look like I'm 30.
  • middlehaitch
    middlehaitch Posts: 8,404 Member
    @queenoscots, there is a good chance your face will improve.

    Once you have hit maintenance, and maintained for a while, the haggard, sick look, fades and your face adjusts better to its new shape.

    This isn't saying you will look 18 again. Just that for a lot of us we tend to look worse as we are losing and improve, as far as age and genetics allow, once in maintenance.

    I can remember when I was around 18 sat talking with friends and saying that I wasn't worried about what I looked like at 40 as I'd be past it by then. Hahaha, how wrong I was. The innocence of youth.

    @annpt77, I'd never think you were dissing (( <3 ))

    Cheers, h.
  • nooshi713
    nooshi713 Posts: 4,873 Member
    I feel that most people look younger when they lose weight.
  • queenoscots
    queenoscots Posts: 44 Member
    Before I got very far in my weight loss journey, I spent time with a dietitian and a psychologist. It was the psychologist who warned me to be prepared for when acqaintances thought I looked ill and wondered if I was sick. I thought I was prepared, but I wasn't. The truth is, I see it in the mirror every day. My doctor and dermatologist reminded me this is one reason to lose the weight while younger: the skin has more elasticity and shrinks better. And of course, the health benefits cannot be underestimated. I'm one of those folks who was morbidly obese, but still had normal blood sugar blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. But my joints really suffered. I'd love to have lost weight sooner and enjoyed the increased mobility in particular. If I hadn't so much weight to lose, perhaps the effect on my skin wouldn't be so dramatic. I have no intention of quitting, and look forward to losing more weight, saggy skin notwithstanding. It takes from the joy, however. Onward, and cheers to all!
  • 777Gemma888
    777Gemma888 Posts: 9,580 Member
    edited November 2018
    Before I got very far in my weight loss journey, I spent time with a dietitian and a psychologist. It was the psychologist who warned me to be prepared for when acqaintances thought I looked ill and wondered if I was sick. I thought I was prepared, but I wasn't. The truth is, I see it in the mirror every day. My doctor and dermatologist reminded me this is one reason to lose the weight while younger: the skin has more elasticity and shrinks better. And of course, the health benefits cannot be underestimated. I'm one of those folks who was morbidly obese, but still had normal blood sugar blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. But my joints really suffered. I'd love to have lost weight sooner and enjoyed the increased mobility in particular. If I hadn't so much weight to lose, perhaps the effect on my skin wouldn't be so dramatic. I have no intention of quitting, and look forward to losing more weight, saggy skin notwithstanding. It takes from the joy, however. Onward, and cheers to all!

    I was 995 lbs. Think Annpt77 stated it best, that results with how aging reveals itself at the end, is rather individualistic.

    There are many teens who have lost major pounds, enough to be featured in National media, yet their skin sags, nasal labial folds droop and they have crepe paper skin. Win some, lose some.

    Your genetics and your actual age compounded by your lifestyle pre-losses does affect your skins ability to recuperate too.

    The bonus to focus on, is your health.
  • missh1967
    missh1967 Posts: 661 Member
    [
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    In my world, the big deal from both weight loss and activity is stuff like health, strength, injury avoidance, balance, and independence . . . especially independence. That's effectively being younger, IMO, look it or not.
    Yes x1000!
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 22,219 Member
    nooshi713 wrote: »
    I feel that most people look younger when they lose weight.

    I agree.

  • jean133mjg
    jean133mjg Posts: 133 Member
    I'm 60 and just say that I'm 80 so I look great for that age. All joking aside, we are all probably our own worst critics.
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,473 Member
    I'm 62 and know I look older than my age. My husband is 17 years older than I am, and I look older than he does. However, I've spend years out in the sun without sunscreen, so I can't say I'm surprised. My mother did the same, without getting wrinkled, but she was obese so it didn't show as it does with me. My body looks good, aside from the lack of breasts, but not my face. My thighs also are wrinkled, but that isn't as obvious, except when I'm running or doing downward dog in yoga. That said, I have no regrets. I'd much rather be slim and fit than obese and less wrinkled.
  • hroderick
    hroderick Posts: 756 Member
    I look older to because the stretched skin wrinkles. So what? There's those things I can control like my weight and those that I can't like my age.