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Unexpected downsides of losing weight

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  • nwnightowl206nwnightowl206 Member Posts: 20 Member Member Posts: 20 Member


    Faebert wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    1) Finding clothes that fit as you decline without spending too much

    2) Skin irritations

    3) You are suddenly the diet expert and everyone asks you for weight loss advice even at funerals

    4) You may have "fat brain" and continue to think you are heavier than you are or make decisions based on the heavier version of yourself.

    5) Food repetition - I can't be the only one that gets into easy to fix and easy to log routines.

    6) Grieving for the the loss of carefree eating - this one I am mostly over but it took a long time

    7) Low energy days

    A version of #6 hits home for me, I miss the convenience of drive thrus, I don't like to cook and I loved being able to just get instant dinner, but once you start looking at what those meals contain it's a whole new ball game, lol.
  • SpadesheartSpadesheart Member Posts: 462 Member Member Posts: 462 Member
    Katmary71 wrote: »
    Mine are the same as others. I hate shopping for clothes and have been putting it off since I want to lose more weight, but I can pull my Jean's down buttoned and zipped! I dislike spending money on temporary clothes, but with summer, it's time to shop.

    It's painful to sit for long, my butt gets sore!

    I spend more money on groceries than I used to. I rarely ate protein and meat is expensive! I didn't go out to eat often before, but used to heat up food. Now I enjoy my food a lot more making it myself.

    OOOOOO yeah that's a another big one! I'm losing weight while building muscle, but right now that means like half my diet is protein rich, low calorie foods. There are only so many protein shakes, cottage cheese, cans of tuna, egg white omelettes, or dry poultry breast you can have before it just gets old. Luckily I can have a little more freedom at maintenance.
  • alexmosealexmose Member Posts: 793 Member Member Posts: 793 Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    1) Finding clothes that fit as you decline without spending too much

    2) Skin irritations

    3) You are suddenly the diet expert and everyone asks you for weight loss advice even at funerals

    4) You may have "fat brain" and continue to think you are heavier than you are or make decisions based on the heavier version of yourself.

    5) Food repetition - I can't be the only one that gets into easy to fix and easy to log routines.

    6) Grieving for the the loss of carefree eating - this one I am mostly over but it took a long time

    7) Low energy days

    True on 3
  • seltzermint555seltzermint555 Member Posts: 10,719 Member Member Posts: 10,719 Member
    nowine4me wrote: »
    @seltzermint555 I developed Reynauds too. They say it’s rare, but I know several others that have it. It even happens when I eat something really cold. Last winter I found some gloves on amazon that are heated with little rechargeable batteries. The brand is Savior. It’s was a big help.

    I think it's weird they say it's rare but I knew 2 other women LONG before I'd lost weight, who had developed it after losing lots of weight, too.

    Thanks for the heated gloves tip! So far it's not been too much of a problem for me but I am glad to know about potential solutions. Mostly I find myself wearing gloves a lot in the fall/winter months, I'm sure it would be worse if I lived in a colder climate (I'm in south-central US where it's fairly moderate). The worst to me is just when dining w/ others and I drink a lot of cold water and they ask why some of my fingers are yellow/white, ugh.
  • KiyomooKiyomoo Member Posts: 301 Member Member Posts: 301 Member
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    edited May 2019
  • PAV8888PAV8888 Member Posts: 8,842 Member Member Posts: 8,842 Member
    Is there redness and a burning sensation at times or mainly really cold hands?

    I would urge all of us who at some point of time developed cold hands to examine our size and length of deficit and consider adaptive thermogenesis which is sometimes partially expressed by lower core temperature and lower resting heart rate.... and cold limbs.

    Re-feeds and diet breaks while on a deficit and extended maintenance at calories high enough to almost be at the point of causing weight gain (as opposed to almost low enough to cause weight loss) MAY help mitigate.

    Generally speaking my hands are no longer as cold as they were when losing and when I first started maintaining, and no longer a problem or concern.

    But if I remain inactive for unusually long, or hit a large enough deficit, I start feeling cold and this includes freezing hands!
    edited May 2019
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