Words that make you cringe

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Replies

  • Muddyboots85
    Muddyboots85 Posts: 164 Member
    Literally used improperly
  • Tigg_er
    Tigg_er Posts: 21,718 Member
    Can we go now ?
  • lkpducky
    lkpducky Posts: 14,999 Member
    "Hater" who came up with that, Kim Kardashian?
    "Butthurt" too many folks I know who use that expression happen to be bullies who said something nasty and then "Oh now you're all butthurt" and what does my butt have to do with getting hurt?
    "You don't want to" uh yes I do, YOU don't want me to. More traditional friends were very bossy when my husband and I were planning our wedding, and I kept hearing that expression from them.
  • your_future_ex_wife
    your_future_ex_wife Posts: 4,278 Member
    Soulmate

    Karma (i prefer to dole out my own payback or just not care rather than waiting for some supposed cosmic justice.)


  • 4legsRbetterthan2
    4legsRbetterthan2 Posts: 19,538 MFP Moderator
    Recent addition.....fitbit....
  • BasedGawd412
    BasedGawd412 Posts: 346 Member
    Cringe
    Creepy
    Sketch
    Yens
    Sir
    Ma'am
  • slimgirljo15
    slimgirljo15 Posts: 269,193 Member
    That C word that rhymes with bunt..

    It is acceptable and sometimes used as a term of endearment.
    In Australia, that word has many connotations – most of which are actually positive. 


    No no no.. hate that word used good or bad.
  • your_future_ex_wife
    your_future_ex_wife Posts: 4,278 Member
    That C word that rhymes with bunt..

    It is acceptable and sometimes used as a term of endearment.
    In Australia, that word has many connotations – most of which are actually positive. 


    No no no.. hate that word used good or bad.

    As I’m sure you know, it’s a very very dirty word in the US.
  • slimgirljo15
    slimgirljo15 Posts: 269,193 Member
    That C word that rhymes with bunt..

    It is acceptable and sometimes used as a term of endearment.
    In Australia, that word has many connotations – most of which are actually positive. 


    No no no.. hate that word used good or bad.

    As I’m sure you know, it’s a very very dirty word in the US.

    Yeah..I know.. it can be very bad here too.. it depends on the situation.. either way, hate that word.
  • noelleb411
    noelleb411 Posts: 4 Member
    Moist...that’s my cringe worthy word :#
  • Ninkasi
    Ninkasi Posts: 173 Member
    Brang

    What is this even? It sounds like onomatopoeia of a piece of rebar hitting a concrete floor.
  • your_future_ex_wife
    your_future_ex_wife Posts: 4,278 Member
    edited June 2019
    Ninkasi wrote: »
    Brang

    What is this even? It sounds like onomatopoeia of a piece of rebar hitting a concrete floor.

    It is an incorrect past tense of the word bring. It’s an old fashioned slang. I know only one person of my age who still uses it so it’s just a personal annoyance.

    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/brang
  • seltzermint555
    seltzermint555 Posts: 10,742 Member
    mouthfeel

    It just grosses me out. When I hear this word used, I imagine something unpleasant in my mouth like Silly Putty or sand.
  • iMago
    iMago Posts: 8,714 Member
    "doggo"

    it's not cute. its something a five year old would say. just called it a puppy if you gotta.
  • lauragreenbaum
    lauragreenbaum Posts: 1,016 Member
    I think I need to get out more because some of these words I've never heard before
  • seltzermint555
    seltzermint555 Posts: 10,742 Member
    iMago wrote: »
    "doggo"

    it's not cute. its something a five year old would say. just called it a puppy if you gotta.

    I agree! I don't mind so much mind people using this online in memes, just joking around, but if it starts trickling into their actual spoken vocabulary that's a little "off" to me.
  • Just_Mel_
    Just_Mel_ Posts: 3,992 Member
    Tits. It has become more commonly used even for kids. Makes me cringe. Hearing kids use swear words still does this. Even though I chose like a sailor.
  • DaleTurner
    DaleTurner Posts: 2 Member
    When people use the word "jive" when they mean to use the word "jibe," as in "those two things do not jibe," meaning they do not add up or reconcile. Unless of course, you're criticizing their ability to swing or to dance or to speak to someone in an exaggerated, teasing, or misleading way, in which case the word "jive" would be correct.
  • JeBeBu
    JeBeBu Posts: 258 Member
    When I hear adults greeting each other using the "N" word. It just sounds ignorant and juvenile.

    Or grown women "affectionately" calling their "friends" b1tches, wh0res, [email protected]
    You may call me by my first name, my professional title (I worked hard for that degree...Dr, professor, etc), Ms/Mz.____
    OR better yet, don't call me at all!