Calorie Counter

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Calories in vs out

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  • whitpaulywhitpauly Posts: 1,321Member Member Posts: 1,321Member Member
    whitpauly wrote: »
    Could be all of the above, I know she says she barely eats cuz her stomach is always hurting but who knows what goes on at her home late at night, was just curious thanks for the replies

    Someone's stomach can hurt for a lot of reasons other than not eating. Have you urged her to see a doctor?

    The last time she went to the doctor they said she had a fatty liver I believe,she never went back cuz he wouldn't prescribe her opioids and said she seemed"drug seeking" and he tried to prescribe her ibuprofen 800 instead and an antidepressant which irritated her but I think she needs it, alcohol used to be a factor but from what I see when we work together she's not hungover like in the past,I know when she drank the night before and I just haven't seen it lately
    edited January 19
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 3,229Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,229Member, Premium Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    heybales wrote: »
    Great input from other posters on the need to weigh food. Also keeping measuring cups and measuring spoons handy is a must. For Example: 1 tbs peanut butter is 94 calories, 1 tbs Olive Oil is 119 calories and 1 tbs mayonaise is 94 calories. And 1 cup of spaghetti is 210 calories. Without measuring it would be easy to eat more calories than your diet would allow.

    Except for the oil - those examples are all great reasons why measuring is NOT a must - but weighing is.
    Especially the peanut butter and spaghetti.

    Calories is per gram - not cups or spoons volumes.

    There are 15 grams in a Tbsp. Most nutrition labels accomodate both grams and cups or whatever. If a person is going by the nutrition label then the measure of a serving doesn't really matter does it? It is whatever measure is stated on the label...am I missing something?

    The nutrition info on the package is correct for the grams listed. The volume measurement listed is an estimate included for convenience, and often a bad estimate at that.

    There is no such rule that there are 15 grams in a tbsp. Grams is a weight, so by definition a tbsp (or cup or gallon) of a heavy substance will be more grams (ie weigh more) than one of a lighter substance.

    According to the bin, a serving of oats is 1/2 cup (40 grams). When I place my dry measuring half cup on the scale, tare it to 0, and start pouring in oats, the scale says 50g before the half cup is full.

    Some people can control their weight just fine without a food scale, I suspect it's a combination of better hunger/satiation signaling, food choices, and sheer luck. But if someone's numbers don't seem to add up and they are struggling, attempting to be more accurate by weighing out portions is a great way to find the problem and refine your data.

    True, but if one uses the same measuring cup and weighs the contents, one might be able to get relative same measurements. I a COH, so I use the same measuring cups... ok lets just say cheap..... if I know a serving of oats measured in this cup will be 37-43gms, wont the rule averages apply? :/
  • kimny72kimny72 Posts: 14,898Member Member Posts: 14,898Member Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    heybales wrote: »
    Great input from other posters on the need to weigh food. Also keeping measuring cups and measuring spoons handy is a must. For Example: 1 tbs peanut butter is 94 calories, 1 tbs Olive Oil is 119 calories and 1 tbs mayonaise is 94 calories. And 1 cup of spaghetti is 210 calories. Without measuring it would be easy to eat more calories than your diet would allow.

    Except for the oil - those examples are all great reasons why measuring is NOT a must - but weighing is.
    Especially the peanut butter and spaghetti.

    Calories is per gram - not cups or spoons volumes.

    There are 15 grams in a Tbsp. Most nutrition labels accomodate both grams and cups or whatever. If a person is going by the nutrition label then the measure of a serving doesn't really matter does it? It is whatever measure is stated on the label...am I missing something?

    The nutrition info on the package is correct for the grams listed. The volume measurement listed is an estimate included for convenience, and often a bad estimate at that.

    There is no such rule that there are 15 grams in a tbsp. Grams is a weight, so by definition a tbsp (or cup or gallon) of a heavy substance will be more grams (ie weigh more) than one of a lighter substance.

    According to the bin, a serving of oats is 1/2 cup (40 grams). When I place my dry measuring half cup on the scale, tare it to 0, and start pouring in oats, the scale says 50g before the half cup is full.

    Some people can control their weight just fine without a food scale, I suspect it's a combination of better hunger/satiation signaling, food choices, and sheer luck. But if someone's numbers don't seem to add up and they are struggling, attempting to be more accurate by weighing out portions is a great way to find the problem and refine your data.

    True, but if one uses the same measuring cup and weighs the contents, one might be able to get relative same measurements. I a COH, so I use the same measuring cups... ok lets just say cheap..... if I know a serving of oats measured in this cup will be 37-43gms, wont the rule averages apply? :/

    Sure, but that's just one example. I eat other stuff that I see a similar problem with. If you want to make mental or written notes of how all of your typical foods fit into your typical measuring utensils, instead of spend $15 on a food scale and just dump all your food into your dishes on the scale instead, that's another way to go :wink:

    After years of weighing and logging portions, I am WAY better at eyeballing what a serving of different foods looks like on my plates and bowls. But I find my view of a portion tends to creep up over time when I get cocky and decide I don't need the food scale anymore. But for some people they do develop that skill and do fine long term without weighing. Not me though!
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Posts: 2,460Member Member Posts: 2,460Member Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    <sniperoo>
    After years of weighing and logging portions, I am WAY better at eyeballing what a serving of different foods looks like on my plates and bowls. But I find my view of a portion tends to creep up over time when I get cocky and decide I don't need the food scale anymore.

    SO MUCH THIS! Both statements. Testify! It's the TRUTH!


  • AvidkeoAvidkeo Posts: 1,595Member Member Posts: 1,595Member Member
    A cup of flour weighs 120 grams, but professional bakers don't measure by the cup because the way the flour is put into the cup will affect the weight. 120 grams of flour will always be 120 grams of flour whether sifted, shaken, packed, or pounded. Same for just about all other foods - mass/weight changes each time the container is filled.

    If serious about counting, get a food scale. I've yet to see one sold in the US that didn't have both Imperial (ounces) and Metric (grams). Less than $10 on Amazon, although there are more expensive ones.

    This. I'm only a home Baker but since I've switched to using weights to measure my dry ingredients my baking is way better and more consistent.

    For the record the Oats thing is so true. I used to only measure by cup but I started weighing out of curiosity, and I was ALWAYS at least 10-20% over the stated weight on the package. So no, there won't be a rule of averages here, you will always be over.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Posts: 7,710Member Member Posts: 7,710Member Member
    heybales wrote: »
    Great input from other posters on the need to weigh food. Also keeping measuring cups and measuring spoons handy is a must. For Example: 1 tbs peanut butter is 94 calories, 1 tbs Olive Oil is 119 calories and 1 tbs mayonaise is 94 calories. And 1 cup of spaghetti is 210 calories. Without measuring it would be easy to eat more calories than your diet would allow.

    Except for the oil - those examples are all great reasons why measuring is NOT a must - but weighing is.
    Especially the peanut butter and spaghetti.

    Calories is per gram - not cups or spoons volumes.

    There are 15 grams in a Tbsp. Most nutrition labels accomodate both grams and cups or whatever. If a person is going by the nutrition label then the measure of a serving doesn't really matter does it? It is whatever measure is stated on the label...am I missing something?

    I'm not sure I understand. Are you saying people have to use whatever unit of measure is on the label? For things like oil, one olive oil is pretty much the same as another when it comes to nutrition -- indeed, other than the breakdown of different types of fat, one oil of any type is pretty much like another. There are entries derived from USDA information you can use to get information based on weight.
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Posts: 2,460Member Member Posts: 2,460Member Member
    For olive oil, there's about 14 grams per Tbsp.

    A good resource for conversions if your recipe or package is by volume is http://www.invive.com/calorie.html.

    This list also gives nutrition information. It might be useful when double-checking things in the MFP database, because we all know that NOTHING is wrong in there. I'm sure that recipe I added fresh garlic to had thousands of calories per garlic clove....
  • bmeadows380bmeadows380 Posts: 1,856Member Member Posts: 1,856Member Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    For olive oil, there's about 14 grams per Tbsp.

    A good resource for conversions if your recipe or package is by volume is http://www.invive.com/calorie.html.

    This list also gives nutrition information. It might be useful when double-checking things in the MFP database, because we all know that NOTHING is wrong in there. I'm sure that recipe I added fresh garlic to had thousands of calories per garlic clove....

    yeah, I've run into that one too; causes an eye-pop on the calorie count until I realize what happened. And its usually the default one pulled in when I build a recipe from a URL, too.

    And then there's the one that says there's 94 calories in 1/2 cup of granulated splenda. that one is irritating, too.
  • Khartman6Khartman6 Posts: 31Member Member Posts: 31Member Member
    No tracker is a hundred percent. It can't be, it doesn't know your body composition, or true fitness level. I'd start by making sure the portions you are entering are what you're actually eating. A food scale is a must if you're just starting out. 2nd, what type of exercises are you doing? Could it be you're gaining muscle mass? When do you weigh yourself? It should always be the same day and time, and only once a week. Also, don't allow the scale to rule your decision on dieting, use it to track progress, but base your decisions by what you see in the mirror. If after a month you don't see any progress on the scale, and in the mirror then change something. As far as eating late, it depends on your goals. Carbs, other then vegetables, should always be avoided later in the day. If your lifting and looking to gain muscle mass, you should always have protein before bed.
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 3,229Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,229Member, Premium Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    heybales wrote: »
    Great input from other posters on the need to weigh food. Also keeping measuring cups and measuring spoons handy is a must. For Example: 1 tbs peanut butter is 94 calories, 1 tbs Olive Oil is 119 calories and 1 tbs mayonaise is 94 calories. And 1 cup of spaghetti is 210 calories. Without measuring it would be easy to eat more calories than your diet would allow.

    Except for the oil - those examples are all great reasons why measuring is NOT a must - but weighing is.
    Especially the peanut butter and spaghetti.

    Calories is per gram - not cups or spoons volumes.

    There are 15 grams in a Tbsp. Most nutrition labels accomodate both grams and cups or whatever. If a person is going by the nutrition label then the measure of a serving doesn't really matter does it? It is whatever measure is stated on the label...am I missing something?

    The nutrition info on the package is correct for the grams listed. The volume measurement listed is an estimate included for convenience, and often a bad estimate at that.

    There is no such rule that there are 15 grams in a tbsp. Grams is a weight, so by definition a tbsp (or cup or gallon) of a heavy substance will be more grams (ie weigh more) than one of a lighter substance.

    According to the bin, a serving of oats is 1/2 cup (40 grams). When I place my dry measuring half cup on the scale, tare it to 0, and start pouring in oats, the scale says 50g before the half cup is full.

    Some people can control their weight just fine without a food scale, I suspect it's a combination of better hunger/satiation signaling, food choices, and sheer luck. But if someone's numbers don't seem to add up and they are struggling, attempting to be more accurate by weighing out portions is a great way to find the problem and refine your data.

    True, but if one uses the same measuring cup and weighs the contents, one might be able to get relative same measurements. I a COH, so I use the same measuring cups... ok lets just say cheap..... if I know a serving of oats measured in this cup will be 37-43gms, wont the rule averages apply? :/

    Sure, but that's just one example. I eat other stuff that I see a similar problem with. If you want to make mental or written notes of how all of your typical foods fit into your typical measuring utensils, instead of spend $15 on a food scale and just dump all your food into your dishes on the scale instead, that's another way to go :wink:

    After years of weighing and logging portions, I am WAY better at eyeballing what a serving of different foods looks like on my plates and bowls. But I find my view of a portion tends to creep up over time when I get cocky and decide I don't need the food scale anymore. But for some people they do develop that skill and do fine long term without weighing. Not me though!

    I think your nearly perfect ma'am.... my opinion is what counts...🤟
  • minimiss669minimiss669 Posts: 24Member Member Posts: 24Member Member
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    No tracker is a hundred percent. It can't be, it doesn't know your body composition, or true fitness level. I'd start by making sure the portions you are entering are what you're actually eating. A food scale is a must if you're just starting out. 2nd, what type of exercises are you doing? Could it be you're gaining muscle mass? When do you weigh yourself? It should always be the same day and time, and only once a week. Also, don't allow the scale to rule your decision on dieting, use it to track progress, but base your decisions by what you see in the mirror. If after a month you don't see any progress on the scale, and in the mirror then change something. As far as eating late, it depends on your goals. Carbs, other then vegetables, should always be avoided later in the day. If your lifting and looking to gain muscle mass, you should always have protein before bed.

    I think I should weigh myself less often because it has thrown me off, whether it is vowing to eat less that day or blowing it because I think it's not working. I like your advice to only use it to track progress.
  • PAV8888PAV8888 Posts: 6,727Member Member Posts: 6,727Member Member
    And then there's the one that says there's 94 calories in 1/2 cup of granulated splenda. that one is irritating, too.

    Well, it is irritating, I guess because it just about doubles the calories; but there would be at least 48 Cal in 1/2 a cup of GRANULATED Splenda :wink: https://www.splendaprofessional.com/studies-science/splenda-sweeteners-compared-sugar]
  • bmeadows380bmeadows380 Posts: 1,856Member Member Posts: 1,856Member Member
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    And then there's the one that says there's 94 calories in 1/2 cup of granulated splenda. that one is irritating, too.

    Well, it is irritating, I guess because it just about doubles the calories; but there would be at least 48 Cal in 1/2 a cup of GRANULATED Splenda :wink: https://www.splendaprofessional.com/studies-science/splenda-sweeteners-compared-sugar]

    Now that just ruins my day :( And they don't list that calorie information on the bag - I had never noticed the fine print until you told me this, but there is a small statement at the very bottom that says "free food up to 8 teaspoons" and "in some recipes, Splenda no calorie sweetener may contribute minimal calories"

    When I'm trying to make every calorie count, that is not news I want to hear!

    I wish Swerve wasn't so darned expensive; it baked well like Splenda does. I don't like using the stevia alternatives as they just don't seem to sweeten well in baked goods, and my luck, they'd be like splenda and add unknown and unwanted calories, too, in large quantities.
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