Calorie Counter

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Calories in vs out

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  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,829Member, Premium Member
    CICO, is all the drives weight changes. What controls CI? Well, imho, is an entire different equation.
  • bearly63bearly63 Posts: 95Member, Premium Member Posts: 95Member, Premium Member
    heybales wrote: »
    Great input from other posters on the need to weigh food. Also keeping measuring cups and measuring spoons handy is a must. For Example: 1 tbs peanut butter is 94 calories, 1 tbs Olive Oil is 119 calories and 1 tbs mayonaise is 94 calories. And 1 cup of spaghetti is 210 calories. Without measuring it would be easy to eat more calories than your diet would allow.

    Except for the oil - those examples are all great reasons why measuring is NOT a must - but weighing is.
    Especially the peanut butter and spaghetti.

    Calories is per gram - not cups or spoons volumes.

    So I should be weighing my peanut butter? Yikes...that will be a mess....but worth it cuz I love it!
  • debrakgooginsdebrakgoogins Posts: 1,828Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,828Member, Premium Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Put the jar on the scale, tare it to 0. Then scoop out your PB, and the negative grams on your scale is the weight of your PB. Make sure to lick the spoon!

    I'm pretty sure I just said that but I forgot the "lick the spoon" detail.

    Sorry, I started my post before you posted but got caught up in work before hitting "post".
    If I had a dollar for every time someone posted the same thing I had previously posted I'd be on vacation right now.

    Great minds think alike. It made me laugh. You might be the one who taught me that trick years ago. It's a game changer.
  • heybalesheybales Posts: 17,138Member Member Posts: 17,138Member Member
    Most packaging measures in both grams and ounces. And I use my scale every day that measures in ounces only...so maybe I can send you a pic to show you what one looks like.

    packaging may say ounces, with grams mentioned.

    But the nutrition label almost always mentions grams in a serving. Maybe ounces where others might show cups or spoons. And you might confirm if those ounces is liquid volume, or actually weight.
    Soup cans I've noticed get wonky.

    But even the rough Servings per package can be off if you were to actually divide.
    So don't use that if eating the whole package - use your own calculator. Maybe once, if you commonly eat the whole package of something.
    It's saved that way in your Food list.
    So if it's actually 1.75 servings - it'll be there next time.
  • PTA4LYFPTA4LYF Posts: 60Member Member Posts: 60Member Member
    Hey guys . Thanks for having me in here. So I’m running into a little bit of dilemma . I’ve been tracking calories to the best of ability and long story short have been using apple watch 4 to track what I have burned for the day . There’s been plenty instances where in vs out ratio was big but for some odd reason I find myself gaining weight instead of loosing . Does eating after 6 pm really is a thing or am I doing something wrong ?? Thanks for any advise or suggestions

    ok lets get serious the theory of weight loss being attributed to calories in vs calories out is only one half of the equation. yes its true you will lose weight by having a calorie deficiency but if you are still eating and making bad food choices you will eventually plateau and stay unhealthy. you need to concentrate on healthy foods that will increase metabolism which promotes weight loss. there is too much to go into for this one post but if you would like to know more please let me know i would love to help you.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 605Member Member Posts: 605Member Member
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    PTA4LYF wrote: »
    Hey guys . Thanks for having me in here. So I’m running into a little bit of dilemma . I’ve been tracking calories to the best of ability and long story short have been using apple watch 4 to track what I have burned for the day . There’s been plenty instances where in vs out ratio was big but for some odd reason I find myself gaining weight instead of loosing . Does eating after 6 pm really is a thing or am I doing something wrong ?? Thanks for any advise or suggestions

    ok lets get serious the theory of weight loss being attributed to calories in vs calories out is only one half of the equation. yes its true you will lose weight by having a calorie deficiency but if you are still eating and making bad food choices you will eventually plateau and stay unhealthy. you need to concentrate on healthy foods that will increase metabolism which promotes weight loss. there is too much to go into for this one post but if you would like to know more please let me know i would love to help you.

    If you want to help, you could start by not spreading misinformation. First of all, CICO is not a theory. Its a simple equation, and depending on which number is greater, you will gain or lose weight. Second of all, the type of food a person eats has zero to do with plateaus. There have been multiple studies that have proven that losing weight alone increases health regardless of the type of food eaten. Is it healthier to eat a varied, nutritious diet? Of course it is, but as long as there is a caloric deficit, you will lose weight. Third, the type of food you eat does not increase your metabolism, nor does it decrease it. There is so much bad information in your post that I just cringed when I read it, and just hope that nobody takes it seriously.

    The type of food does not increase your metabolism. To add on a bit though there is a difference in the calories the body requires to process foods.

    "For example, the energy used to process foods is about 5–10% of the calories the food contains for carbs, 0–5% for fat and 20–30% for protein"

    From this article: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/negative-calorie-foods#fact-vs-fiction


  • JustSomeEmJustSomeEm Posts: 17,066Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 17,066Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    Hey guys - Welcome to the debate section where debating is fine. Attacking other users or baiting others with off-topic and inflammatory accusations is not debating - it's violating MFP guidelines. This thread has been cleaned up a little to remove posts that contained or quoted off-topic or attacking content.

    Debate, don't attack.
    Em
  • Aaron_K123Aaron_K123 Posts: 7,108Member Member Posts: 7,108Member Member
    PTA4LYF wrote: »
    Hey guys . Thanks for having me in here. So I’m running into a little bit of dilemma . I’ve been tracking calories to the best of ability and long story short have been using apple watch 4 to track what I have burned for the day . There’s been plenty instances where in vs out ratio was big but for some odd reason I find myself gaining weight instead of loosing . Does eating after 6 pm really is a thing or am I doing something wrong ?? Thanks for any advise or suggestions

    ok lets get serious the theory of weight loss being attributed to calories in vs calories out is only one half of the equation. yes its true you will lose weight by having a calorie deficiency but if you are still eating and making bad food choices you will eventually plateau and stay unhealthy. you need to concentrate on healthy foods that will increase metabolism which promotes weight loss. there is too much to go into for this one post but if you would like to know more please let me know i would love to help you.

    Weight loss is only "one half of the equation of health" so in that way calories in vs calories out is only one-half of the equation of health. Also your bodies weight is comprised of more than just fat, water weight has a large influence on day to day or even week to week values on the scale...and calories in vs calories out is not a big influencer of water weight.

    What calories in vs calories out is is 100% of the equation for fat loss, which presumably is the goal of people who are dieting.

    After all, even though what people say is they want to lose weight what they hopefully actually mean is that they want to reduce their total percent bodyfat because it is at an unhealthy level. Getting your percent bodyfat under control and into a healthy range is certainly part of being healthy but yes, of course, it isn't the only part of being healthy.


    This idea that certain foods will "increase your metabolism" though is just utterly false so I'd get away from that sort of thinking. There is no way to "increase metabolism" other than in the sense of increasing your BMR by having more muscle mass which in turn requires a certain amount of activity and calories to maintain. Now, through choices in diet and exercise you can increase your muscle mass and therefore your BMR. But the reason for the increase is the added muscle, not the food you ate....and if you are aiming for a calorie deficit you aren't going to be putting on any muscle so its a moot point.
    edited October 23
  • Duck_PuddleDuck_Puddle Posts: 2,587Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,587Member, Premium Member
    Just as my n=1, my Apple Watch (series 4) overestimates my calories burned by about 20%. Workout calories (the active calories) are in line with other reasonable estimates-but my total calories for the day is very high.

    I would not be losing if I were using my AW as a guide for how many calories I burned.

    Your watch isn’t a lab-quality device that should be taken as gospel. It’s consistent-so it’s likely to be approximately the same level of accuracy every day-but It’s not necessarily giving you a correct number.
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 867Member Member Posts: 867Member Member
    Just as my n=1, my Apple Watch (series 4) overestimates my calories burned by about 20%. Workout calories (the active calories) are in line with other reasonable estimates-but my total calories for the day is very high.

    I would not be losing if I were using my AW as a guide for how many calories I burned.

    Your watch isn’t a lab-quality device that should be taken as gospel. It’s consistent-so it’s likely to be approximately the same level of accuracy every day-but It’s not necessarily giving you a correct number.

    Simple solution, get a Garmin, their vivofit seems to underestimate calories quite a bit. >:)
    68563859_2448942688496885_9151544099013132288_n.png?_nc_cat=111&_nc_oc=AQkU9QW0ij5X7k-mUyT1TMAqqiCUpN_th99pTb1aNJ0AE1c-Ne64jxKI1NwHk_6Slek&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=f0d83a6ad884fc18aa35fb23daaa5648&oe=5E1EC591
  • amy19355amy19355 Posts: 722Member, Premium Member Posts: 722Member, Premium Member
    72 days. I think some of the other posters may be out of country since there are references to grams. Since we don’t have the metric system in US it is just easier to track in ounces, cups and teaspoons. Grams are listed on all of the packages but then more work to convert.

    the flaw in your logic is that ounces, cups and teaspoons are measuring volume which is not the same as weight.

    Example:

    a cup of cooked rice can be loosely or firmly packed into a measuring cup. the weight and calories will vary. It's quite difficult to confidently know the weight of the portion from the volume, especially when the volume is not consistent from one portion to the next.

    as for grams vs ounces - scales and smart phones have made all that conversion much more accessible.
    edited October 24
  • Duck_PuddleDuck_Puddle Posts: 2,587Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,587Member, Premium Member
    Just as my n=1, my Apple Watch (series 4) overestimates my calories burned by about 20%. Workout calories (the active calories) are in line with other reasonable estimates-but my total calories for the day is very high.

    I would not be losing if I were using my AW as a guide for how many calories I burned.

    Your watch isn’t a lab-quality device that should be taken as gospel. It’s consistent-so it’s likely to be approximately the same level of accuracy every day-but It’s not necessarily giving you a correct number.

    Simple solution, get a Garmin, their vivofit seems to underestimate calories quite a bit. >:)
    68563859_2448942688496885_9151544099013132288_n.png?_nc_cat=111&_nc_oc=AQkU9QW0ij5X7k-mUyT1TMAqqiCUpN_th99pTb1aNJ0AE1c-Ne64jxKI1NwHk_6Slek&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=f0d83a6ad884fc18aa35fb23daaa5648&oe=5E1EC591

    I’m using a Garmin (Fenix) for my needs here. I was only mentioning that the OP is using an Apple Watch to measure his calorie burn and my AW estimates quite high.

    So In addition to logging inaccuracies affecting the CI, an overestimate of calories burn could be contributing to the problem on the CO side.
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