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  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Member, Premium Posts: 708 Member Member, Premium Posts: 708 Member
    Morning gardeners! Just wanted to say how lovely the photos are and how this thread uplifts me! All the nature is such a beauty to behold!

    🌞🌻🌻🌻🌻🌻
  • debrakgooginsdebrakgoogins Member, Premium Posts: 2,024 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,024 Member
    The flying fuzzy striped pandas love my Catmint.

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  • earlnabbyearlnabby Member Posts: 8,050 Member Member Posts: 8,050 Member
    Five days later (and the first bloom is still beautiful. They last a long time).

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  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 5,659 Member Member Posts: 5,659 Member
    Beautiful. Next year my goal is to focus more on flowers.
  • weatherking2019weatherking2019 Member Posts: 846 Member Member Posts: 846 Member
    My garden this year is a pallet garden. First try and so far so good.
    I have harvested bunch of kale, swiss chard and first zuchinni! I see tomatoes getting ready and cucumbers getting there. The herbs are also thriving. I LOVE it!!!
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  • spinnerdellspinnerdell Member Posts: 180 Member Member Posts: 180 Member
    My garden this year is a pallet garden. First try and so far so good.
    I have harvested bunch of kale, swiss chard and first zuchinni! I see tomatoes getting ready and cucumbers getting there. The herbs are also thriving. I LOVE it!!!
    jwkqfog6zfeu.jpg
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    Interesting! Your plants look beautiful and healthy. I wonder if the pallets would help deter rabbits. We seem to have a bumper crop of the cute little garden munchers this year.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 16,452 Member Member, Premium Posts: 16,452 Member
    Too lazy to veggie garden much anymore (instead, I support my local farmers at the markets, at higher cost but more variety). Around the yard, I have mostly ornamentals, some perennial herbs. Usually, I buy ornamental anuals and put some pots around garage and main door, but I was mostly staying out of the garden centers (and everywhere else). I decided to plant up some pots of annual herbs from seed, instead . . . but I got a super late start, right around the end of June/beginning of July.

    However, it's been hot enough to encourage germination/growth here, so my dill, cilantro, and basil are coming along nicely for their age. They'll be needing some thinning soon. :yum: I also planted some nasturtiums for looks, and salad, not shown, but also around 6" or so tall already.

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    (They're sitting on a bed of super-thuggy tiny sedum, next to my garage.) Little lower germination of the cilantro, vs. others, but should be enough to eat for a while, for one.

    On the ornamental front, it's been a good cactus year. The largest prickly pear (Opuntia sp.) I have, that lives outdoors year round here in Michigan in a homemade hypertufa trough, bloomed for the very first time ever - blooms are palm-of-hand sized beauties. Also, a quirky houseplant orchid cactus, Epiphyllum guatamalense "Monstrose", decided to bloom shortly after I moved it out to the deck for the summer. It has interesting twisted foliage, and is a night bloomer.

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    I have some lettuce and mesclun seeds I'm planning to plant in aluminum foil roaster pans I have kicking around here, for cut-and-come-again greens, but it's too hot right now. Saving that for later, when they won't be so quick to bolt.
  • moonangel12moonangel12 Member, Premium Posts: 852 Member Member, Premium Posts: 852 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Too lazy to veggie garden much anymore (instead, I support my local farmers at the markets, at higher cost but more variety). Around the yard, I have mostly ornamentals, some perennial herbs. Usually, I buy ornamental anuals and put some pots around garage and main door, but I was mostly staying out of the garden centers (and everywhere else). I decided to plant up some pots of annual herbs from seed, instead . . . but I got a super late start, right around the end of June/beginning of July.

    However, it's been hot enough to encourage germination/growth here, so my dill, cilantro, and basil are coming along nicely for their age. They'll be needing some thinning soon. :yum: I also planted some nasturtiums for looks, and salad, not shown, but also around 6" or so tall already.

    6hevaks648ve.jpg

    (They're sitting on a bed of super-thuggy tiny sedum, next to my garage.) Little lower germination of the cilantro, vs. others, but should be enough to eat for a while, for one.

    On the ornamental front, it's been a good cactus year. The largest prickly pear (Opuntia sp.) I have, that lives outdoors year round here in Michigan in a homemade hypertufa trough, bloomed for the very first time ever - blooms are palm-of-hand sized beauties. Also, a quirky houseplant orchid cactus, Epiphyllum guatamalense "Monstrose", decided to bloom shortly after I moved it out to the deck for the summer. It has interesting twisted foliage, and is a night bloomer.

    k0hvuqp31ozh.jpg

    I have some lettuce and mesclun seeds I'm planning to plant in aluminum foil roaster pans I have kicking around here, for cut-and-come-again greens, but it's too hot right now. Saving that for later, when they won't be so quick to bolt.

    Prickly Pear = jelly in my brain! My dad has made it many times, but I don’t think he’s done it for a few years now (before they moved out west they spent the summers RVing out there so didn’t have the time).
  • moonangel12moonangel12 Member, Premium Posts: 852 Member Member, Premium Posts: 852 Member
    Zinnias are in full bloom - such happy flowers!

    My 7 year old son is my farmer, he loves growing pumpkins (HUGE ones when we had the room in N.C., smaller varieties now)... the tomato was an impulse buy. The tiny yellow pear plant we brought home has exploded! Had to anchor it to the picnic table because it just won’t stay upright... 6’ wooden stakes on order but open for any other ideas! Unfortunately the pumpkin variety we tried this year (blanking on name, saved seeds from a local farm purchase) isn’t doing well, and the tomato plant appears to have taken out one of his two surviving plants in the last “fall” (lean?).
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    ETA: learned a neat tomato tip from a local farmer, where I bought the plant. She asked how it was doing and if any had started to turn. I told her it was loaded, but all still very green. She said o go through and pick a handful of the green tomatoes from around the plant and then they would start. Days later he harvested his first 3, and a week later he’s getting several a day!
    edited July 24
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,258 Member Member Posts: 5,258 Member
    I've only got an urban balcony, but happy about my second harvest of pea shoots for tonight's stir fry.
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  • ReenieHJReenieHJ Member Posts: 2,140 Member Member Posts: 2,140 Member
    At the moment, I have a green bean forest in my garden. Good grief, what am I going to do with them all???? They don't freeze that well, do they?
  • ReenieHJReenieHJ Member Posts: 2,140 Member Member Posts: 2,140 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    At the moment, I have a green bean forest in my garden. Good grief, what am I going to do with them all???? They don't freeze that well, do they?

    They freeze wonderfully. Blanch them for 3 minutes in boiling water, then plunge into an ice bath. Dry and freeze.

    Thank you! For some reason I thought they turned gross when you tried to cook/eat them after frozen. But will definitely try that! Dh doesn't eat many veggies, he had gr. beans for dinner 1x and called it good. :/ Last night, my dinner consisted of 1/4 cantaloupe and 3 c. of green beans. :) Even I'm getting a bit green beaned out. :blush:

    Ok, so another garden question. My strawberries are all done. But now they're sprouting extra growth on them, with tiny flowers.(Going to seed maybe? And what does that mean?) I'm just wondering if there is anything I should be doing with them now? When can you divide them? Last year was when I planted them for the 1st time, only got a few berries. But this year they were like bushes, got tons of berries.
    I've planted stuff for years but am still such a novice at this. :/

    Thank you for all your help!!!
  • earlnabbyearlnabby Member Posts: 8,050 Member Member Posts: 8,050 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    At the moment, I have a green bean forest in my garden. Good grief, what am I going to do with them all???? They don't freeze that well, do they?

    They freeze wonderfully. Blanch them for 3 minutes in boiling water, then plunge into an ice bath. Dry and freeze.

    Thank you! For some reason I thought they turned gross when you tried to cook/eat them after frozen. But will definitely try that! Dh doesn't eat many veggies, he had gr. beans for dinner 1x and called it good. :/ Last night, my dinner consisted of 1/4 cantaloupe and 3 c. of green beans. :) Even I'm getting a bit green beaned out. :blush:

    Ok, so another garden question. My strawberries are all done. But now they're sprouting extra growth on them, with tiny flowers.(Going to seed maybe? And what does that mean?) I'm just wondering if there is anything I should be doing with them now? When can you divide them? Last year was when I planted them for the 1st time, only got a few berries. But this year they were like bushes, got tons of berries.
    I've planted stuff for years but am still such a novice at this. :/

    Thank you for all your help!!!

    Many strawberries are what is called “everbearing ”. They have a major crop early in the summer but continue to produce some fruit until the frost/end of growing season. Let them do their thing and enjoy the extra treat. They don't divide well but you get new plants on the runners (called "pups"). If the pups root in the soil near the mother plant, you can just cut the runner and transplant the pup. Pups on runners can be planted in a small pot while still attached to the mother and separated and planted as soon as the roots are established.

    Frozen beans aren’t as crisp as fresh but they do not turn into mush like canned. I need to clarify my instructions. After the ice water, by drying them I mean pat dry to remove extra moisture. I drain mine in a colander then lay them out on a kitchen towel, pat a minute with the towel and bag them for the freezer
    edited July 26
  • saltysparklesaltysparkle Member, Premium Posts: 107 Member Member, Premium Posts: 107 Member
    I am just a beginning gardener, and I'm moving to a place soon where the only gardening I'll be able to do, at least for a year, is in some elevated beds. I'd really like to grow some veggies. Anyone have some easy/foolproof veggies or fruits that will grow okay in elevated beds? (I'm in US gardening zone 6a.)

    Editing to add: The large bed is 8x2', and then there are two 1x2' planters.
    edited July 27
  • earlnabbyearlnabby Member Posts: 8,050 Member Member Posts: 8,050 Member
    I am just a beginning gardener, and I'm moving to a place soon where the only gardening I'll be able to do, at least for a year, is in some elevated beds. I'd really like to grow some veggies. Anyone have some easy/foolproof veggies or fruits that will grow okay in elevated beds? (I'm in US gardening zone 6a.)

    Editing to add: The large bed is 8x2', and then there are two 1x2' planters.

    How deep are they? As long as the beds are at least 10" deep, you can grow anything. You can also consider grow bags. A 5 gallon grow bag would be perfect for one tomato plant. My elevated bed is 4' x 2' x 12" and I have lettuce, spinach. bunching onions, snap peas, and carrots. My neighbor is growing tomatoes and peppers in his and using pots for greens and beans.

    Two great gardening tip YouTube channels for growing in containers/elevated beds are Epic Gardening and MIGardener. Epic is in San Diego so some tips might not apply to cooler climates but MIGargener is in Michigan (Port Huron to be exact which is probably either zone 5 or 6)
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 22,272 Member Member Posts: 22,272 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    My sister has husk cherries growing, never tried them before and cannot say I'm a huge fan.

    My strawberries were amazing this year. First couple pickings were huge and now at the tail end they're small but still so good. :) Slugs were kinda pesky though.
    Now I'm picking green peas(think mine were a bit slow) and they're yummy eating right out of the pod.

    Yeah, I have to plant a LOT of green peas in order to get enough for them to make it into the house ;)

    Here in Massachusetts I have planted them as early as St. Patrick's Day (per "The Victory Garden") but more often I wait until April 1 to start. I stagger planting to extend the season.

    Re strawberries and slugs - I like straw for mulching strawberries. Slugs seem to prefer leaves. I also use Sluggo Plus. And I try to not have the plants too close together, which is difficult, as they keep having babies, lol.
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