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Coronavirus prep

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  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 22,721 Member Member Posts: 22,721 Member
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    Thanks for posting this. My friend who had corona only talks about the fatigue and fever. I wasn’t aware of the other lingering symptoms.
    I have had a little more dizziness and fatigue (I have cfs) than usual this spring. I feel like I just can’t get over allergies.
    I Went to the Dr. this spring for a sinus Infection for the first time in maybe 30 years. I have lots more stomach problems than
    Usual. No nausea, vomiting or fever (my temperature is running 97.? As opposed to normal 99.0.
    Makes me suspect even more that I had Corona early.

    @corinasue1143

    You are welcome!!

    Back on page 302 I posted some links of interest few weeks ago. At the bottom of this post is one of them explaining how COVID-19 affected Richard Quest. He is not the only one feeling the "leftovers" of the virus. Many people on line (and I am sure on FB too but I am not a member), have posted about the side effects of the infection. And those older folks that had survived hospitalization and ventilators may need to go to a rehab place or have a lot of care at home. Younger and healthy ones are not excluded either. This virus doesn't discriminate at all.

    I get very angry at "people" saying that it is only a sniffle for younger people and that they will be good in a day or two if they are infected. That level of ignorance is pathetic, callous, and very damaging.

    I got Covid-19 two months ago. I'm still discovering new areas of damage -- Richard Quest
    https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/07/health/richard-quest-covid-wellness-intl/index.html

    Well, there’s another symptom. My kitchen has been a real mess the last few months. I spill a lot more and am too tired to clean. I also make a mess when I clean, spill the mop water, etc. I’m stumbling and falling a bit more than usual, but blamed that on post-shingles pain being worse the last few months than the last few years. Maybe it’s corona. Who knows?
    Also read somewhere that many people’s hair falls out. I have been cleaning my hair brush more often because of all the hair in it. I didn’t worry about it, just noticed. I have lots of hair.
    How do you know if it’s corona or just life?
    Maybe when they get a new test perfected to see if you’ve had it or not, I’ll take that test?

    @corinasue1143 I have a lot of those symptoms when my anemia gets out of control. In my case the fix isn't so simple because of my uterine fibroids and crazy blood loss, but when I was younger and for many people iron deficiency is easy to fix. Have you had your iron levels tested recently?
    edited July 27
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 22,721 Member Member Posts: 22,721 Member
    Diatonic12 wrote: »
    I can’t give out my gps coordinates. Six degrees of separation is more like one degree here.🌎 There is no help for anyone with co19. You will have to drive yourself to a neighboring state if you need to be admitted in for emergency care.

    I think she just wanted a general location :)

    You're in Alaska, right?
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 22,721 Member Member Posts: 22,721 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Diatonic12 wrote: »
    @paperpudding The test was $250.00, the same price it was months ago. We don't have any free tests.

    That is against federal law.

    Only if you have insurance. The federal law requires insurance companies, Medicare, and Medicaid to cover the test. If you're uninsured, you'll get a bill.

    Here are ways for the uninsured to get help (but I realize it may not help people in locations where resources are few and far between, like Alaska):

    https://khn.org/news/bill-of-the-month-covid19-tests-are-free-except-when-theyre-not/

    ...Uninsured consumers may be able to get a free COVID-19 test several ways, Pollitz said. One way is to visit an outpatient testing area at a facility that received relief funding — the law bars the provider from balance-billing patients for care related to the coronavirus.

    Another option is through Medicaid. States may now use the government health insurance program for the poor and disabled to cover the cost of testing uninsured residents who qualify.

    A third way consumers could receive a free COVID-19 test is through the National Disaster Medical System. That network of health care providers — generally activated in response to an emergency — treats patients and then charges the federal government for their services, said Pollitz. However, she acknowledged, it may be difficult to find a provider who participates in the program.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 22,721 Member Member Posts: 22,721 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    I'd be curious about the statistics of people that wore masks versus didn't wear masks, of the ones who've contracted Covid. I'd imagine it's almost impossible to know.

    I can't answer that exact question, but here in "Mask-achusetts," we've done a great job flattening our curve until just recently, where I unfortunately see we are on a bit of an uptick.

    83fe0ca28ac1fec1157380071ac0f25e.png

    I heard a story about 5 reporters observing mask usage in different parts of the state - seems like there is less compliance at "fun" places.

    I only go to medical appointments, the grocery store, and Home Depot, and have seen close to 100% compliance there.
    edited July 27
  • jenilla1jenilla1 Member Posts: 10,246 Member Member Posts: 10,246 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Diatonic12 wrote: »
    I can’t give out my gps coordinates. Six degrees of separation is more like one degree here.🌎 There is no help for anyone with co19. You will have to drive yourself to a neighboring state if you need to be admitted in for emergency care.

    I think she just wanted a general location :)

    You're in Alaska, right?

    There are no neighboring states in Alaska...That's why my guess is Wyoming.
  • rheddmobilerheddmobile Member Posts: 5,777 Member Member Posts: 5,777 Member
    I went to Memphis today - used to go around once per month or more and haven't since everything shut down. @rheddmobile and @gradchica27 maybe have more frequent insight, but on my one visit in a long time, I was pleased to see most people actually wearing masks in stores there and most were even wearing them properly. There were a few peekaboo noses, but far better compliance than where I live (about 80 miles north).

    I ran a lot of miles and even saw a lot of people wearing masks outside when walking. I admit I wasn't wearing a mask when running either, because it was enough of a struggle already and when it is hot and humid, it does seem to make a difference when running as the mask gets soggy. I feel like I'm very out of shape, but that is another topic altogether. Anyway, while the park was pretty packed, I wasn't near people for more than a second if we even got within 6 feet because we were all moving.

    Anyway, I also went for lunch at a buffet in what I would call a suburb of Memphis. They required masks when not sitting at the table eating. When we got up to go to the buffet, there were lines and we had to wait for the next available employee. They would grab a plate, go with me to get whatever food I wanted, and put it on the plate. When it was full, they handed the plate to me and we went to eat. I think the idea is to avoid everyone touching the serving spoons and stuff. The employees had masks and gloves. It wasn't terribly busy most of the time and I never really had to wait long for someone to help me. I was pleased to see that, when there was 1 employee in the buffet area and I came up to the empty line, the guy started helping me, but then stopped at one point as he noticed someone else walk into the buffet area without a mask. Drink were self-serve, and I think the desserts were self-serve (I didn't eat and didn't even ask, but they are individually platted). This guy had come over to the dessert area. The employee stopped helping me, went over, and reminded that customer to put his mask on, then came back over to finish plating mine. I am sure this would irritate some people, but I was glad to see that.

    Anyway, today was a higher risk day, but it was refreshing to get a bit more outside of my immediate area for once.
    Interesting, I thought buffets were illegal in the county right now. I haven’t had the nerve to hit the main trails at Shelby Farms myself, the Tour de Wolf area was mostly what I would consider safe but the lake part was too crowded for me.

    The low incidence of peekaboo noses is probably partly because the county mask law specifies that noses and mouth must be covered.
  • gradchica27gradchica27 Member Posts: 733 Member Member Posts: 733 Member
    I went to Memphis today - used to go around once per month or more and haven't since everything shut down. @rheddmobile and @gradchica27 maybe have more frequent insight, but on my one visit in a long time, I was pleased to see most people actually wearing masks in stores there and most were even wearing them properly. There were a few peekaboo noses, but far better compliance than where I live (about 80 miles north).

    I ran a lot of miles and even saw a lot of people wearing masks outside when walking. I admit I wasn't wearing a mask when running either, because it was enough of a struggle already and when it is hot and humid, it does seem to make a difference when running as the mask gets soggy. I feel like I'm very out of shape, but that is another topic altogether. Anyway, while the park was pretty packed, I wasn't near people for more than a second if we even got within 6 feet because we were all moving.

    Anyway, I also went for lunch at a buffet in what I would call a suburb of Memphis. They required masks when not sitting at the table eating. When we got up to go to the buffet, there were lines and we had to wait for the next available employee. They would grab a plate, go with me to get whatever food I wanted, and put it on the plate. When it was full, they handed the plate to me and we went to eat. I think the idea is to avoid everyone touching the serving spoons and stuff. The employees had masks and gloves. It wasn't terribly busy most of the time and I never really had to wait long for someone to help me. I was pleased to see that, when there was 1 employee in the buffet area and I came up to the empty line, the guy started helping me, but then stopped at one point as he noticed someone else walk into the buffet area without a mask. Drink were self-serve, and I think the desserts were self-serve (I didn't eat and didn't even ask, but they are individually platted). This guy had come over to the dessert area. The employee stopped helping me, went over, and reminded that customer to put his mask on, then came back over to finish plating mine. I am sure this would irritate some people, but I was glad to see that.

    Anyway, today was a higher risk day, but it was refreshing to get a bit more outside of my immediate area for once.
    Interesting, I thought buffets were illegal in the county right now. I haven’t had the nerve to hit the main trails at Shelby Farms myself, the Tour de Wolf area was mostly what I would consider safe but the lake part was too crowded for me.

    The low incidence of peekaboo noses is probably partly because the county mask law specifies that noses and mouth must be covered.

    We were out in rural AR this weekend, and I felt normal for the first time in a very long time. Whatever demon weed that’s been wreaking havoc with my sinuses apparently doesn’t grow in the Ozarks, so no headache! No post nasal drip! Amazing.

    Social distancing via pontoon boat, so while I didn’t see many masks, we were not within 100 yards of others. Only time we were remotely close to others was one gas stop and a drive through. Saw a few masks driving through at gas stations/stores, but really wasn’t out and about, except on the lake. Did see a few pretty full church parking lots and one mom and pop restaurant that was super full and not distanced, but also saw some church signs saying “worship suspended bc of Covid threat”. So it was hard to gauge situation there...although by the numbers, that whole county has 55 total cases (like, 55 since the beginning of Covid), 11 within 7 days. My county gets 200+ a day (so we were happy to stay away from people, considering we were the more likely vector). Stayed at a family owned lake house, so didn’t need to interact with anyone for rental either.

    I haven’t been out around Shelby Co in a while, so I can’t speak to mask usage. I don’t see mask wearing when I’m out walking/running but I don’t come near anyone and it’s “feels like 107”, so there are few people out anyway
  • T1DCarnivoreRunnerT1DCarnivoreRunner Member Posts: 11,056 Member Member Posts: 11,056 Member
    I went to Memphis today - used to go around once per month or more and haven't since everything shut down. @rheddmobile and @gradchica27 maybe have more frequent insight, but on my one visit in a long time, I was pleased to see most people actually wearing masks in stores there and most were even wearing them properly. There were a few peekaboo noses, but far better compliance than where I live (about 80 miles north).

    I ran a lot of miles and even saw a lot of people wearing masks outside when walking. I admit I wasn't wearing a mask when running either, because it was enough of a struggle already and when it is hot and humid, it does seem to make a difference when running as the mask gets soggy. I feel like I'm very out of shape, but that is another topic altogether. Anyway, while the park was pretty packed, I wasn't near people for more than a second if we even got within 6 feet because we were all moving.

    Anyway, I also went for lunch at a buffet in what I would call a suburb of Memphis. They required masks when not sitting at the table eating. When we got up to go to the buffet, there were lines and we had to wait for the next available employee. They would grab a plate, go with me to get whatever food I wanted, and put it on the plate. When it was full, they handed the plate to me and we went to eat. I think the idea is to avoid everyone touching the serving spoons and stuff. The employees had masks and gloves. It wasn't terribly busy most of the time and I never really had to wait long for someone to help me. I was pleased to see that, when there was 1 employee in the buffet area and I came up to the empty line, the guy started helping me, but then stopped at one point as he noticed someone else walk into the buffet area without a mask. Drink were self-serve, and I think the desserts were self-serve (I didn't eat and didn't even ask, but they are individually platted). This guy had come over to the dessert area. The employee stopped helping me, went over, and reminded that customer to put his mask on, then came back over to finish plating mine. I am sure this would irritate some people, but I was glad to see that.

    Anyway, today was a higher risk day, but it was refreshing to get a bit more outside of my immediate area for once.
    Interesting, I thought buffets were illegal in the county right now. I haven’t had the nerve to hit the main trails at Shelby Farms myself, the Tour de Wolf area was mostly what I would consider safe but the lake part was too crowded for me.

    The low incidence of peekaboo noses is probably partly because the county mask law specifies that noses and mouth must be covered.

    Dyer County also specifically requires nose and mouth are covered, but enforcement isn't happening here.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 38,204 Member Member Posts: 38,204 Member
    Diatonic12 wrote: »
    @cwolfman13 There's no tellin' where the money went. The money for testing proly went for road and bridge construction. B)

    The money was so fine it was simply irresistible. :p

    It's not about money being delved out for testing...federal law requires all test sites to accept any and all insurance, including medicare and medicaid. If an individual is uninsured they are still to be tested for free and the hospital is to request reimbursement by the federal government.

    The government didn't just send out blank checks to cover free testing...there is no money that could have been diverted to road and bridge construction.
  • Diatonic12Diatonic12 Member Posts: 11,801 Member Member Posts: 11,801 Member
  • jseams1234jseams1234 Member Posts: 1,186 Member Member Posts: 1,186 Member
    Diatonic12 wrote: »

    Did you even notice the date of the article or that her admission date and test was done in the middle of March? March 11, 2020 to be exact. This was before most states even started to shut down. I know here in California we didn't close shop at my work until March 17 and that was earlier than most. Testing wasn't widespread or easily available at that time and there were no mandates or policies regarding testing - at any level.
  • jseams1234jseams1234 Member Posts: 1,186 Member Member Posts: 1,186 Member
    So, I don't get it... the CDC is right when it aligns with what people want to believe, but they are horribly misinformed when it goes against? ... or are we saying that we can't trust the CDC because their guidance is politically motivated?

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/reopening-schools.html

    COVID-19 and Children

    The best available evidence indicates that COVID-19 poses relatively low risks to school-aged children. Children appear to be at lower risk for contracting COVID-19 compared to adults. To put this in perspective, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as of July 17, 2020, the United States reported that children and adolescents under 18 years old account for under 7 percent of COVID-19 cases and less than 0.1 percent of COVID-19-related deaths.[5] Although relatively rare, flu-related deaths in children occur every year. From 2004-2005 to 2018-2019, flu-related deaths in children reported to CDC during regular flu seasons ranged from 37 to 187 deaths. During the H1N1pandemic (April 15, 2009 to October 2, 2010), 358 pediatric deaths were reported to CDC. So far in this pandemic, deaths of children are less than in each of the last five flu seasons, with only 64.† Additionally, some children with certain underlying medical conditions, however, are at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19.*

    Scientific studies suggest that COVID-19 transmission among children in schools may be low. International studies that have assessed how readily COVID-19 spreads in schools also reveal low rates of transmission when community transmission is low. Based on current data, the rate of infection among younger school children, and from students to teachers, has been low, especially if proper precautions are followed. There have also been few reports of children being the primary source of COVID-19 transmission among family members.[6],[7],[8] This is consistent with data from both virus and antibody testing, suggesting that children are not the primary drivers of COVID-19 spread in schools or in the community.[9],[10],[11] No studies are conclusive, but the available evidence provides reason to believe that in-person schooling is in the best interest of students, particularly in the context of appropriate mitigation measures similar to those implemented at essential workplaces.
    edited July 27
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