Calorie Counter

Message Boards Debate: Health and Fitness
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Lose a stone in 21 days with Michael Mosley - opinions!

2

Replies

  • VailaraVailara Member Posts: 2,104 Member Member Posts: 2,104 Member
    It seems to be based largely from his Fast 800 book (which to be fair, does have some evidence behind it, although I think that was mostly with meal replacement products). Losing a stone in 21 days is ambitious but I think that for all of these diet programmes, they tend to choose obese participants who have been eating a lot beforehand, so they have a more dramatic deficit. It's maybe possible for that particular group of people (although not all of that would be fat loss)?

    The book suggests a combo of Mediteranean style eating, 800 calories, and 5:2 eating (for after the initial fast weight loss period). I'm hoping the final programme will give participants (and people following at home) advice on how to go forward after the first month.

    He did qualify as a doctor many years ago, but I feel it's a bit misleading that he's promoted as a medical doctor as I don't believe he has practiced since then. I can't see him on the GMC register (although he might be under a different name). He picks up the latest bits of research and writes very successful books about it. He's previously done books on intermittent fasting and HIIT, and a "blood sugar diet" (basically the 800 calorie one) and has a current book out on Covid-19.

    I think the participants from the studies he bases it on were followed up for a year, but on his website the testimonials seem to be mainly from people who have lost small amounts of weight over a short period of time.
    edited August 16
  • bmeadows380bmeadows380 Member Posts: 2,937 Member Member Posts: 2,937 Member
    I read one of his books once (the blood sugar diet one), that recommended the 800 VLCD, but from what I remember in the book, it highly stressed that it was to be done for a very restricted time frame under medical supervision - definitely not long term.

    The danger I'm seeing in the books and the tv shows is how many people won't consult their doctor but will just decide to try that kind of diet on their own, especially based upon the results from the TV show, and how many people will pick up terrible ideas on food and exercise in the process.
  • threewinsthreewins Member Posts: 775 Member Member Posts: 775 Member
    sofrances wrote: »
    I would be more interested in a program that successfully helps people keep weight off for a long period of time.

    So would I!!!!! (Yes, 5 exclamation marks). I've been at goal weight 5 times in the last 25 years.
  • freda78freda78 Member Posts: 228 Member Member Posts: 228 Member
    OK, What is it that is causing your doubts? The sustainability? I know the participants were struggling at one point.

    Back up a few posts as I have already said there why I have my opinions on this show.
  • freda78freda78 Member Posts: 228 Member Member Posts: 228 Member
    sofrances wrote: »
    I would be more interested in a program that successfully helps people keep weight off for a long period of time.

    Me too.
  • LunaTheFatCatLunaTheFatCat Member Posts: 180 Member Member Posts: 180 Member
    I really like Michael Mosly, raging I missed this programme, hopefully I can find it online somewhere.
    That said, I've no intention in starving myself on 800 cals!
  • VailaraVailara Member Posts: 2,104 Member Member Posts: 2,104 Member
    I've watched the last episode. They did manage to lose about a stone on average in three weeks and all improved in other measures of health. They did actually talk quite a lot about the long-term. I think part of the point of the rapid weight loss was that people (in the study they mentioned) tended to keep more off for longer than people who lost slowly. The participants did seem motivated towards the end and they talked to somebody who had done it a couple of years ago and was maintaining. I think they were planning to form a support group and were going to check in. It would be good to do a few follow-ups to see how they are doing.

    It wasn't perfect - they oddly put somebody's better Vitamin D levels down to eating "greens", rather than supplements and sunlight. And obviously made to make good TV - as I mentioned, choosing participants who were already eating and drinking a lot and would have more dramatic results. The book suggests 12 weeks, and I bet for most people the big losses are in the first three weeks, so if the programme had been longer it wouldn't have been so exciting!
  • Diatonic12Diatonic12 Member Posts: 12,978 Member Member Posts: 12,978 Member
    Lose 14 lbs in 21 days and eat it all back in 10. Days.

    The skin's elasticity can handle only so much dropping it like it's hot until it begins to hang like a shar-pei dog. There's only choices and consequences.

    It doesn't matter which brutally strict diet you choose, if they worked you would conduct the crash diet one time and it would fix everything for you. It doesn't. It's a temporary bandaid.

    It's the Shock and Awe Approach to food. Eat all the things and then eat mostly nothin'. It's overcompensation and it will not offer you lasting stability with your weight. Wild swings UP and down and back and forth. Starting over and over and over. This is what a lifetime of crash dieting will give you.
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Member Posts: 2,007 Member Member Posts: 2,007 Member
    I too saw the last programme. In my view it gave a reasonable round up of the events in the previous weeks. Each participant had health issues which they wanted to leave behind to give them more time with family and other inspirations this will set them up well for the future. Family members gave short resumé too.

    Vitamin D deficiency did come up and it was mentioned the person involved was taking vit d supplements. I've no found any support for the suggestion of green veg being part of it. The sun, dairy and "some" mushrooms come well up the list.

    The way I heard it was, those who lost more were more likely to keep it off. The key is knowing how hard it was to get to the weight they needed for health and not returning to how they used to eat, ever on a permanent basis. Loosing weight quickly achieving ones goals can be more effective than, in my words, "*kitten* footing" it about cutting only a tiny few calories for a very long time.

    From personal experience I know, ok, for me the example of one. I've had help to resolved the causes and consequences of my autoimmunity and though I've gained some weight in the last 6 months, I'm still not far off healthy. I've kept most of my loss off for 6 years, gosh, realising that, Its quite an achievement. Need to get back to what I was doing and stop feeling intimidated by the rising numbers of international COVID Deaths. My motivation, being here for my family.
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Member Posts: 2,007 Member Member Posts: 2,007 Member
    Michael Mosely has another programme coming out. Only had a glance at the trailer, seems he is working with a number of specialists to see if as a group they can help individuals with persistent health issues.
  • VailaraVailara Member Posts: 2,104 Member Member Posts: 2,104 Member
    It was the person themselves who said that their Vitamin D levels were down to eating greens, and MIchael Mosley agreed, but I think was just being polite! But a little bit of misinformation!

    I can see how the dramatic results would be motivating for the participants. And I think they did take care to do it safely.

    OP, it is based on some research - it hasn't come out of nowhere. But having said that, there are lots of caveats about people who should not do it, so you are right to be concerned (for instance, it's only for people who have a fair bit of weight to lose). It's definitely not for everybody. I'm not sure if one size fits all anyway, when it comes to dieting. If 1500 calories and exercise is working for you, then why change unless you want to? Please don't feel bad about not jumping on the latest fashion (because although there's evidence for it having good results, I do think it's just one of the things that's "in" just now, not a magic cure, it's only a few weeks, and we've yet to see the results many years down the line).

  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 43,340 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 43,340 Member
    Dude is an actor. NOT A DIETICIAN.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Member Posts: 2,007 Member Member Posts: 2,007 Member
    He qualified as a doctor some years ago since when he has been a medical journalist. His wife is a dietitian who worked in collaboration with a University team, I did not realise I would need to remember which one. I doubt very much if you have seen any of his broadcast output nor read any of his books. He is in the UK and I am fairly certain you are in the US.
  • FuzzipegFuzzipeg Member Posts: 2,007 Member Member Posts: 2,007 Member
    I'd not realised he was read that far. I wonder though, did you see the programme? Listening to medical related programs as I do, I know it is not unheard of for some practices to do similar plans with their at risk/high risk patients. True I can't bring and exact case to mind. Years of listening and reading is a long time. When there was the "New" way of treating Diabetes, lower carb, the idea was take up all over because it worked. If this programme gives some "at high risk" persons the incentive to request similar support from their practice and they become more healthy, that must be a better outcome. As well as in long run cheaper for the NHS. I've no experience of your Doctor Oz. I gather many of your doctors provide pills and the like for their patients, ours in the NHS have to use what is in their lists.

    I know there are many faults with our medical system, the treatment of those with endocrine issues can be open to post code differences in available treatments. I had to turn to a "functional approach" to get my health back. Saying so on here brings down a hail of, "its not medicine" and disagrees. The same and more in-depth tests were done as any doctor could call on here, yet its rubbished. For me and many others, it works.
  • IronIsMyTherapyIronIsMyTherapy Member Posts: 463 Member Member Posts: 463 Member
    Just like "Get Rich Quick with Jim Smith!". The people that benefit most are the people selling the program.
  • JoDavo66JoDavo66 Member Posts: 198 Member Member Posts: 198 Member
    I was sceptical but found the programme interesting.
    The key thing that was missed by the media & probably many people who watched it was that this was a short term 3 week programme to give people with obesity & related health problems a kick start to improve health, motivation & change mindset in short term so following something more sustainable was more realistic.
    I could not function at work on 800 calories a day & wouldn't try it BUT I've been told by my GP & Nurse Practitioner to reduce my carbs & up my protein as my previous diet stopped working with perimenopause and I have gained weight on a previously healthy diet for me. So, I bought the recipe book for Mosely's diet and am trying a lot of the recipes because they are keto based (therefore high protein) but most include a carb addition too (which fits his 5:2 regime) so good suggestions for mix & match. Lots of salmon & other fish recipes as well as vegetarian which is good for me as I'm pescitarian although tend to eat more vegetarian meals- so good for increasing protein.
    It certainly isn't a long term diet or a quick fix
  • greyhoundwalkergreyhoundwalker Member Posts: 4 Member Member Posts: 4 Member
    JoDavo66 wrote: »
    Lots of salmon & other fish recipes as well as vegetarian which is good for me as I'm pescitarian although tend to eat more vegetarian meals- so good for increasing protein.
    It certainly isn't a long term diet or a quick fix

    Which book did you get? (He has loads) I’m also pescatarian but mainly vegetarian, also couldn't manage on and wouldn’t eat only 800 calories per day, but the food in that programme looked really good. Lower calorie and yummy. I already tried the mushroom base pizza and that was super tasty.
  • tgillies003tgillies003 Member, Premium Posts: 247 Member Member, Premium Posts: 247 Member
    Sustainable weight loss is achieved with a small caloric deficit over time. On average no more than 2 lbs per week is recommended.
Sign In or Register to comment.