Are carbs the enemy?

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Replies

  • Lastchancetochange
    Lastchancetochange Posts: 146 Member
    charmmeth wrote: »
    The recommended balances are:
    45–65% of calories from carbs
    20–35% of calories from fats
    10–35% of calories from proteins.
    If you log your food, mfp will calculate the percentages for you (the pie chart at the bottom of your daily food diary) but will only tell you if you ahve gone over, not if you are under. It's useful to know that 1g of carbs or protein = 4 cals, whilst 1g of fat = 9 cals.

    Some helpful points to consider when deciding macros/diet planning are on the UK's NHS website: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-weight/why-we-need-to-eat-carbs/
    and here: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/best-macronutrient-ratio#diet-quality.

    Everyone is different, and you need to work out what is best for you. I am someone who generally feels better with higher carbs but I love cheese and if I don't think about this a bit my diet ends up 40% fats, 40% carbs and 20% protein. Calories are what matter for weight loss, so I lost weight fine on that balance; I just started to feel deenergised. However, if all my carbs come from bread I feel deenergised too, so I try to mix them up.

    Good luck!

    I don't agree with this analysis. It's simplistic. Brocolli is carbs and a pizza is carbs and fat, take the cheese out and carbs plus maybe protein. Brocolli is super healthy and a pizza isn't.

    Is that good for weight loss or healthy. No.

    So for me the answer is, if you are trying to lose weight ( a.k.a. more than 10 pounds ) you should eliminate cereals ( rice, bread, pasta, flour ) and sugar.

    And yes, you can blast carbs on veggies, which is a whole different story.

    Anyhow just how I see it.

    Thanks

    Roberto.
  • watts6151
    watts6151 Posts: 898 Member
    edited October 2020
    sal10851 wrote: »
    Carbs are only bad if your diet is consistently based on that food group. If you eat balanced meals with healthy fats, proteins, and fiber the overall glycemic load will not cause a quick spike in blood sugar and insulin responses. Refined carbs such as pastries or sugary drinks are what you should be worried about.

    But what if I want quick insulin responses ? with it been the most anti catabolic hormone in the human body?
    May come in handy at some point
  • brenn24179
    brenn24179 Posts: 2,137 Member
    for me carbs are the devil. When I started eating 100 gr or less of carbs, my weight came off and I am not as hungry.
  • Diatonic12
    Diatonic12 Posts: 32,344 Member
    Baked chips. Yuck, I need a bucket. You're so smart.
  • mariomicro
    mariomicro Posts: 74 Member
    edited October 2020
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Donuts and chips aren't really "carbs." They are foods that are about half carbs and half fat.
    Foods that are mostly just carbs would include most fruit and a plain potato or plain sweet potato, among other things.


    For the purpose of avoiding an insulin spike, it is largely irrelevant whether some foods contain only carbs or both carbs and fat. Dietary carbohydrates will convert immediately into glucose and that will trigger an insulin response, which will eventually trigger fat storage, whether taken with dietary fat or not.
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
    mariomicro wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Donuts and chips aren't really "carbs." They are foods that are about half carbs and half fat.
    Foods that are mostly just carbs would include most fruit and a plain potato or plain sweet potato, among other things.


    For the purpose of avoiding an insulin spike, it is largely irrelevant whether some foods contain only carbs or both carbs and fat. Dietary carbohydrates will convert immediately into glucose and that will trigger an insulin response, which will eventually trigger fat storage, whether taken with dietary fat or not.

    🥱🥱🥱
  • gisem17
    gisem17 Posts: 50 Member
    ccrdragon wrote: »
    And yet, the fact that you never want to discuss is that there can be no NET fat gain (insulin spikes or not) as long as the person is eating in a deficit. The body is constantly storing and breaking down fat throughout the day regardless of the mix of food that the person is eating.

    It is hard to be "eating in a deficit" if you are constantly binging on high carb, high fat foods.