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Complete beginner. My workout?

I am a beginner. A PT made a workout for me. I want to go off on my own though now. I can not ask the PT again. Its not an option. I want to build muscle. I want to do 3 full body workouts a week. My workout being:
Lateral pull down
Seated cable row
Shoulder press machine
Hammer curl
Leg press
Deadlift
Kettle bell squat.
Is this efficient? Will this target main muscle groups? Will I build muscle.

Replies

  • Retroguy2000
    Retroguy2000 Posts: 126 Member
    Probably, assuming you have an energy surplus and are getting enough protein.

    While that's a solid list, I see it's missing chest and you have one type of curl (there are many, some hit different parts of the bicep than others), but you don't have anything for the triceps which is the bulk of the upper arm.

    Also, it seems like a very large list for a single session. How many sets do you plan to do? I'd suggest picking at least one of the push, pull and legs options for each session, for say four exercises total, so about 12 sets, and do the alternatives in the next session. Deadlift counts as back and legs. Start with the bigger compound stuff first like legs and deadlift, and finish with isolation stuff like curls last.
  • rileysowner
    rileysowner Posts: 7,806 Member
    Jayj180894 wrote: »
    I am a beginner. A PT made a workout for me. I want to go off on my own though now. I can not ask the PT again. Its not an option. I want to build muscle. I want to do 3 full body workouts a week. My workout being:
    Lateral pull down
    Seated cable row
    Shoulder press machine
    Hammer curl
    Leg press
    Deadlift
    Kettle bell squat.
    Is this efficient? Will this target main muscle groups? Will I build muscle.

    Lateral Pulldown and Seated Cable Rows are both back domninate exercises. I would suggest dropping either the Pulldowns or the Seated Rows. They also work your biceps, so you could drop the Hammer Curls as it is better as a beginner to focus on exercises that are not isolation exercises.

    I would add a Bench Press to that list, and probably drop the Leg Press and focus on the Deadlifts and Kettlebell Squats.

    These changes would make for a better
  • Jayj180894
    Jayj180894 Posts: 285 Member
    Probably, assuming you have an energy surplus and are getting enough protein.

    While that's a solid list, I see it's missing chest and you have one type of curl (there are many, some hit different parts of the bicep than others), but you don't have anything for the triceps which is the bulk of the upper arm.

    Also, it seems like a very large list for a single session. How many sets do you plan to do? I'd suggest picking at least one of the push, pull and legs options for each session, for say four exercises total, so about 12 sets, and do the alternatives in the next session. Deadlift counts as back and legs. Start with the bigger compound stuff first like legs and deadlift, and finish with isolation stuff like curls last.

    I think it's a good idea getting some tricep work in there thanks. I was doing chest press on the machine but due to an old injury the movement is painful. But good idea with the triceps. If you feel it is a good list then I will do it. I just don't want to go to the gym and people think that my workout makes no sense! Haha!
    Jayj180894 wrote: »
    I am a beginner. A PT made a workout for me. I want to go off on my own though now. I can not ask the PT again. Its not an option. I want to build muscle. I want to do 3 full body workouts a week. My workout being:
    Lateral pull down
    Seated cable row
    Shoulder press machine
    Hammer curl
    Leg press
    Deadlift
    Kettle bell squat.
    Is this efficient? Will this target main muscle groups? Will I build muscle.

    Lateral Pulldown and Seated Cable Rows are both back domninate exercises. I would suggest dropping either the Pulldowns or the Seated Rows. They also work your biceps, so you could drop the Hammer Curls as it is better as a beginner to focus on exercises that are not isolation exercises.

    I would add a Bench Press to that list, and probably drop the Leg Press and focus on the Deadlifts and Kettlebell Squats.

    These changes would make for a better

    I think I'll drop the lat or cable then, no point doing both. With the hammer curls I would like to give them ago as I haven't worked with dumbbells before so would be nice to try an exercise with dumbells and as my biceps are very uneven strength wise I feel it would be beneficial. I think I will deffo add bench press but right notlw I'm not confident at the gym so I would like to build confidence before I try that. I must say though I will not drop the leg press just because I love doing them! Haha
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 39,841 Member
    I wouldn't drop the lat pulls or cable rows. They both work the back, but different muscles in the back. I do them both every workout, but my program is full body 2x per week. For a 3x per week, I personally would alternate between them.
  • Jthanmyfitnesspal
    Jthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 3,030 Member
    How about joining an exercise class that helps you learn some new stuff? So many ways to get stronger!
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,082 Member
    edited October 13
    Without knowing how you respond to training there isn't a definitive answer.
    Will I build muscle?
    With adequate stimulus, recovery, and protein/leucine consumption you are in the ball park as far as exercise selection is concerned. Since you are somewhat novel to training one doesn't need a grand selection of movements at this point.

    My professional opinion I would probably...
    1. Add a more horizontal press
    2. Replace the kettle bell squat for either a barbell squat, step up, split squat, etc...
    3. Remove the lat pull down as you will more than likely get sufficient stimulus with your deadlift currently.

    Again, the correct amount of stimulus is needed here. This doesn't necessarily mean you need a lot for your experience.
  • GaryRuns
    GaryRuns Posts: 472 Member
    edited October 13
    There's nothing wrong with coming up with your own program, and as others have pointed out, as a novice resistance trainee you can almost just look at the weights and make progress ;) , but why not figure out what your goal is and pick a program based on that? There are so many free programs out there put together by people that know what they're doing. Here's a thread that lists many such programs

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you/p1

    You'll find that as you get more advanced it's not trivial to make a program that is well balanced, progressive and practical. Easier to "steal" one of the free ones.
  • Jayj180894
    Jayj180894 Posts: 285 Member
    Thanks guys for the great advice guys! Tonight I did lat pull downs, shoulder press, hammer curls, the rope cable thing you pull down for triceps. I also did leg press and kettle bell squats. I did do cable row as well but I was waiting for another machine. I didn't get to do deadlift due to the gym being busy. I will drop the kettlebell squats once I get confident with a barbell and the squat rack as I want to do back squats. I will deffo look at the made up programmes as its probably easier than stressing. My main aim is to build up my legs and gluteus. I also want to build up my biceps especially as my left arm is so much weaker than my right and you can actually feel the difference in the arms so I need to build them up! I also want to just try new exercises one at a time to just build confidence. I do go to classes but they are conditioning and I feel they don't focus on building weights up. Thank you all very much!
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 37,791 MFP Moderator
    What are your overall goals? Do you want to target any body part areas? Are you looking to maximize muscle gains or do you want to stay lean?
  • Jayj180894
    Jayj180894 Posts: 285 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    What are your overall goals? Do you want to target any body part areas? Are you looking to maximize muscle gains or do you want to stay lean?

    I want to build on my legs, back and upper arms mainly.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 37,791 MFP Moderator
    Jayj180894 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    What are your overall goals? Do you want to target any body part areas? Are you looking to maximize muscle gains or do you want to stay lean?

    I want to build on my legs, back and upper arms mainly.

    I think overall your program is a bit unbalanced. Ideally with a full body routine, it will primarily focused on the bigger lifts and then you can add specific training.

    So for example, you could pick a few of the programs from the below link and then add extra volume for the bodyparts you want to focus on.

    https://betterme.world/articles/3-day-full-body-workout/

    Alternatively, you could look at a program like Thinner Leaner Stronger (its a book) that has several workout plans that can be adapted as you go. It has a 3,4 and 5 day program.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,082 Member
    How about joining an exercise class that helps you learn some new stuff? So many ways to get stronger!

    1. A exercise class doesn't build strength, it's more of endurance training. We might see some brief initial improvements, but nothing of what the OP has stated is her goals.
    2. The OP goal is hypertrophy, not strength which a class is again a poor choice with the info we have.
  • Jayj180894
    Jayj180894 Posts: 285 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    How about joining an exercise class that helps you learn some new stuff? So many ways to get stronger!

    1. A exercise class doesn't build strength, it's more of endurance training. We might see some brief initial improvements, but nothing of what the OP has stated is her goals.
    2. The OP goal is hypertrophy, not strength which a class is again a poor choice with the info we have.

    I do some classes but like you said it's not going to build substantial muscle. If we do use dumbells, Kettlebell or barbell they are very low weight very high reps in a time limit. It almost feels like cardio and you just end up fatiguing because of the high intensity. If I was to use the same weight when lifting I wouldn't gain anything
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 22,333 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    How about joining an exercise class that helps you learn some new stuff? So many ways to get stronger!

    1. A exercise class doesn't build strength, it's more of endurance training. We might see some brief initial improvements, but nothing of what the OP has stated is her goals.
    2. The OP goal is hypertrophy, not strength which a class is again a poor choice with the info we have.

    Well . . . the circuit-y kind of classes, sure.

    I took a group class at a point in the past that was purely standard strength training, starting with a core set of lifts for which we learned the form, then some alternates and accessories, all supervised, and eventually some personalization to individuals in the class as the instructor got everyone into a basic routine they could do on their own during the class time, so that he had more time to give individual attention.

    Instructor was a quite-successful power lifter (male), though in one of the lighter weight classes (and he taught more broadly than the standard competitive lifts). He said he actually preferred teaching women (though he taught both), because he thought we were more likely to listen and take instruction vs. think we knew better already (😆 *he* said it, I didn't!); and he liked how excited about it women were more likely to be, having had relatively little encouragement/experience with strength training in the past

    I hope there might still be some classes like that out in the world, because it was IMO a decent combination of sensible and very affordable. (It was an adult ed class, taught through the school system, in a very nice and well-equipped high school gym.)

    I'm sure it's not optimal as compared with one-on-one with a good, experienced personal trainer . . . but it put some in-person instruction and personalization in reach of a much wider demographic. It may a quibble about whether this counts as an "exercise class" or not, but it was listed with other more standard "exercise class" options.

  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,082 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    How about joining an exercise class that helps you learn some new stuff? So many ways to get stronger!

    1. A exercise class doesn't build strength, it's more of endurance training. We might see some brief initial improvements, but nothing of what the OP has stated is her goals.
    2. The OP goal is hypertrophy, not strength which a class is again a poor choice with the info we have.

    Well . . . the circuit-y kind of classes, sure.

    I took a group class at a point in the past that was purely standard strength training, starting with a core set of lifts for which we learned the form, then some alternates and accessories, all supervised, and eventually some personalization to individuals in the class as the instructor got everyone into a basic routine they could do on their own during the class time, so that he had more time to give individual attention.

    Instructor was a quite-successful power lifter (male), though in one of the lighter weight classes (and he taught more broadly than the standard competitive lifts). He said he actually preferred teaching women (though he taught both), because he thought we were more likely to listen and take instruction vs. think we knew better already (😆 *he* said it, I didn't!); and he liked how excited about it women were more likely to be, having had relatively little encouragement/experience with strength training in the past

    I hope there might still be some classes like that out in the world, because it was IMO a decent combination of sensible and very affordable. (It was an adult ed class, taught through the school system, in a very nice and well-equipped high school gym.)

    I'm sure it's not optimal as compared with one-on-one with a good, experienced personal trainer . . . but it put some in-person instruction and personalization in reach of a much wider demographic. It may a quibble about whether this counts as an "exercise class" or not, but it was listed with other more standard "exercise class" options.

    I can see what you are thinking Ann, but I'm referring to the generic term of "exercise class" such as body pump, TRX, etc...for any noticeable benefits relative to the OP's goal other than the first couple weeks for a inactive person...not a possibly a partial exception that needs to be defined further than the generic term.

    I specifically speaking of the OP's goal of hypertrophy and assuming some strength as well. She is not going to benefit long term from a "class" other than maybe adherence which her goal post has then changed as far as short term goals then. Nothing wrong with a class for other goals but I wouldn't expect a result of change for the OP has expressed a want for.

    I might know who you are speaking of as I trained on vacation in that identical situation and according the trainer's wife he wouldn't shut up about me training at the high school gym when he was at home discussing his day. He and I both have a lot of female clients/athletes and also have passion for training advanced age people.

    Also yes whoever you speak of has definitely taught more the standard competitive lifts. That is a misconception we powerlifters only train or coach three lifts. We use a wide variety of lifts, variations, intensities, and rep ranges in training and coaching as well as cardio. We only perform the three lifts the best because of specificity to the task at hand and our frequency increases as a meet is near.

    Again Ann I know where you are coming from, but I'm speaking on generic terms that we would find 99% of the time. I hope I had some success in explaining my thoughts. I hope your day is well!
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,082 Member
    Jayj180894 wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    How about joining an exercise class that helps you learn some new stuff? So many ways to get stronger!

    1. A exercise class doesn't build strength, it's more of endurance training. We might see some brief initial improvements, but nothing of what the OP has stated is her goals.
    2. The OP goal is hypertrophy, not strength which a class is again a poor choice with the info we have.

    I do some classes but like you said it's not going to build substantial muscle. If we do use dumbells, Kettlebell or barbell they are very low weight very high reps in a time limit. It almost feels like cardio and you just end up fatiguing because of the high intensity. If I was to use the same weight when lifting I wouldn't gain anything

    I appreciate you know this and I'm very happy to hear you are seeking ways to achieve your goals!

    If you have more questions we can discuss your training further whenever you like.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 22,333 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    How about joining an exercise class that helps you learn some new stuff? So many ways to get stronger!

    1. A exercise class doesn't build strength, it's more of endurance training. We might see some brief initial improvements, but nothing of what the OP has stated is her goals.
    2. The OP goal is hypertrophy, not strength which a class is again a poor choice with the info we have.

    Well . . . the circuit-y kind of classes, sure.

    I took a group class at a point in the past that was purely standard strength training, starting with a core set of lifts for which we learned the form, then some alternates and accessories, all supervised, and eventually some personalization to individuals in the class as the instructor got everyone into a basic routine they could do on their own during the class time, so that he had more time to give individual attention.

    Instructor was a quite-successful power lifter (male), though in one of the lighter weight classes (and he taught more broadly than the standard competitive lifts). He said he actually preferred teaching women (though he taught both), because he thought we were more likely to listen and take instruction vs. think we knew better already (😆 *he* said it, I didn't!); and he liked how excited about it women were more likely to be, having had relatively little encouragement/experience with strength training in the past

    I hope there might still be some classes like that out in the world, because it was IMO a decent combination of sensible and very affordable. (It was an adult ed class, taught through the school system, in a very nice and well-equipped high school gym.)

    I'm sure it's not optimal as compared with one-on-one with a good, experienced personal trainer . . . but it put some in-person instruction and personalization in reach of a much wider demographic. It may a quibble about whether this counts as an "exercise class" or not, but it was listed with other more standard "exercise class" options.

    I can see what you are thinking Ann, but I'm referring to the generic term of "exercise class" such as body pump, TRX, etc...for any noticeable benefits relative to the OP's goal other than the first couple weeks for a inactive person...not a possibly a partial exception that needs to be defined further than the generic term.

    I specifically speaking of the OP's goal of hypertrophy and assuming some strength as well. She is not going to benefit long term from a "class" other than maybe adherence which her goal post has then changed as far as short term goals then. Nothing wrong with a class for other goals but I wouldn't expect a result of change for the OP has expressed a want for.

    I might know who you are speaking of as I trained on vacation in that identical situation and according the trainer's wife he wouldn't shut up about me training at the high school gym when he was at home discussing his day. He and I both have a lot of female clients/athletes and also have passion for training advanced age people.

    Also yes whoever you speak of has definitely taught more the standard competitive lifts. That is a misconception we powerlifters only train or coach three lifts. We use a wide variety of lifts, variations, intensities, and rep ranges in training and coaching as well as cardio. We only perform the three lifts the best because of specificity to the task at hand and our frequency increases as a meet is near.

    Again Ann I know where you are coming from, but I'm speaking on generic terms that we would find 99% of the time. I hope I had some success in explaining my thoughts. I hope your day is well!

    I was sure you'd understand where I was coming from, Chief. I wasn't sure OP would automatically understand that distinction, though. There's a huge difference - as I 100% know you know - between something like Bodypump and others of that ilk, vs. something that's more like a decently thought out multi-person personal-training-like experience, so a bit more affordable than one on one personal training, thus maybe more accessible to lower income folks. It's just a way to learn form, get some personal supervision while learning it.

    I don't feel comfortable sharing other people's full names here, but the guy I took classes from was a lighter weight class powerlifting guy named Bill, who lived and worked in mid-Michigan. That was a couple decades back, so I'm not sure he's still even around - he was a little older than me, I think, so he'd be 70s or 80s now at least, if still around. Haven't heard of him in years, though - he & I worked for the same large employer (different departments) in our day jobs, by coincidence . . . I also haven't seen any indication in employee/retiree communications that he's passed away. He was not at your competitive level, either.
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,695 Member
    Re: the chest press and old injury. If it were me I would want to be gradually building up that injured spot and improving it, without reinjury. Not just neglecting it because of pain. Did the PT suggest any workarounds? Have you tried incline press, push-ups, and other options for chest which might not hurt? If those hurt, you could maybe start really gently with a counter push-up or something similar.