For the love of Produce...

1128129131133134139

Replies

  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,846 Member
    edited January 5
    On a trip to Sainsburys yesterday I came across a lone bag of Jerusalem Artichokes. It had been abandoned in the broccoli trays. I’ve never seen them before in real life and it’s a mystery to me where it came from as I couldn’t find more!

    Anyway, I bought them, of course…always up for something new in the vegetable world.

    Does anyone have any favourite ways with them?
  • acpgee
    acpgee Posts: 6,602 Member
    We've got quite a lot of celery in the fridge because we needed the leaves for dutch split pea soup made on the weekend. I put some julienned celery in my Sichuan fish fagrant pork stir fry last night, and made a waldorf salad two days ago. Thinking of trying these
    https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/celery_stir_fry/
    https://www.justhungry.com/celery-chili-pepper-pickles-serori-no-pirikara-zuke

    Ideas for using celery welcome.
  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,846 Member
    Celery is surprisingly good braised in stock until just tender - I use vegetable stock but I’m sure chicken or even a ham stock would be good too.

    I also make a bean salad that uses a lot of fairly finely sliced celery. Kidney Beans, Broad Beans, lightly steamed green/fine/dwarf/Kenyan beans and a classic French dressing. There’s a bit of finely sliced Red Onion in there too.

    I often add celery to a tray of Mediterranean style roast veg too, or throw some into the pasta water for the last two minutes, helps bulk up the pasta and adds flavour. It also goes well in coleslaw, and I often add it to soups. Oh and it always goes into Kimchi in my house!
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,867 Member
    I love jerusalem artichokes (sunchokes)--mostly just slice them up, add a little olive oil and salt and pepper and roast.

    I have tried something similar to this soup, which was also good: https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1015365-jerusalem-artichoke-soup-with-crispy-sage-leaves
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,867 Member
    edited January 5
    I'm still working through all the winter squash I have on hand -- made a variety of different kinds of soups/stews with them (and lots of kale too), but am currently mostly just chopping them up, roasting, and using the roasted squash for all kinds of things -- add to a soup, add to my black eyed peas and collard dish (also has carrot, celery, onion, pepper, since there's discussion about celery), add to a smoothie or big salad, just eat as a side.

    Any ideas for daikon radishes? I've done a simple boiled daikon with some ginger and green onion recently and done a quick pickle with them in the past.
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 7,660 Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    Roast chicory tonight was awesome. I used to only drizzle with olive oil and a sprinkle of salt but a few drops of something sweet like honey, maple syrup, date molasses or ginger syrup is a lovely foil to the bitterness.
    644zq9dha2qt.jpg

    I had to look up chicory because the pictures you've been showing of them don't look like what I call chicory. I think of chicory as a dandelion-like plant. The root has historically been dried and ground as a coffee substitute or an addition to coffee. A brand famous for it is "Chock Full 'o Nuts." A brand of coffee substitute that uses chicory is Pero.

    Apparently what I'd call Endive is also called chicory in some places. How interesting. Thanks for helping me learn something new!
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 7,660 Member
    On a trip to Sainsburys yesterday I came across a lone bag of Jerusalem Artichokes. It had been abandoned in the broccoli trays. I’ve never seen them before in real life and it’s a mystery to me where it came from as I couldn’t find more!

    Anyway, I bought them, of course…always up for something new in the vegetable world.

    Does anyone have any favourite ways with them?

    Raw, sliced thin. As snacks or in salad. Crunchy and with a sunflower flavor.
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 7,660 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I'm still working through all the winter squash I have on hand -- made a variety of different kinds of soups/stews with them (and lots of kale too), but am currently mostly just chopping them up, roasting, and using the roasted squash for all kinds of things -- add to a soup, add to my black eyed peas and collard dish (also has carrot, celery, onion, pepper, since there's discussion about celery), add to a smoothie or big salad, just eat as a side.

    Any ideas for daikon radishes? I've done a simple boiled daikon with some ginger and green onion recently and done a quick pickle with them in the past.

    Kimchi
  • acpgee
    acpgee Posts: 6,602 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    I'm still working through all the winter squash I have on hand -- made a variety of different kinds of soups/stews with them (and lots of kale too), but am currently mostly just chopping them up, roasting, and using the roasted squash for all kinds of things -- add to a soup, add to my black eyed peas and collard dish (also has carrot, celery, onion, pepper, since there's discussion about celery), add to a smoothie or big salad, just eat as a side.

    Any ideas for daikon radishes? I've done a simple boiled daikon with some ginger and green onion recently and done a quick pickle with them in the past.

    This is a favourite thing to do with a small squash. After scraping out the seeds, fill with water and measure to figure out how much custard you need, keeping in mind an egg white is 30ml and an egg yolk is 15 ml approximately. I cook mine in the microwave at 300 watts instead of the traditional steamer.
    https://www.cambodiarecipe.com/recipe/cambodian-pumpkin-coconut-custard/

    I love roast radishes, and would do that with cubed daikon too.
    https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/simple-roast-radishes

    I also like a quick pickle of spiralized or grated carrot and daikon.
    https://mykoreankitchen.com/pickled-carrots-and-daikon-radish/
  • acpgee
    acpgee Posts: 6,602 Member
    I also put daikon in tempura dipping sauce which can be used whenever you need a mild asian dipping sauce. I just blitz a little daikon in a mini food processor. If I had more daikon than I knew what to do with I would puree in the food processor, freeze in silicon ice cube trays to add to tempura dipping sauce.
    https://www.thespruceeats.com/tempura-dipping-sauce-2031533
  • o0Firekeeper0o
    o0Firekeeper0o Posts: 407 Member
    @AnnPT77 I am SO sorry I never replied, but it looks like @acpgee @purplefizzy gave you some good ideas!
    I use Meyer lemons in any lemon application, which for me is… Almost anything lol. I love my citrus. Meyers are super juicy and have a slightly more ‘refined’ lemon flavor, I feel. Less just ‘sour’ and more dynamic. I absolutely love them.
  • acpgee
    acpgee Posts: 6,602 Member
    Ideas needed for my next vegetable glut of mung bean sprouts. The hubby is craving Pad Thai which I promised to make tomorrow. Will not have time to sprout my own mung beans so will buy them from the Asian supermarket which means tons of leftover sprouts.

    Any ideas on what to do with the excess? My typical uses are Korean beansprout namul (blanched, drained, dressed with garlic, salt and sesame oil) or Vietnamese pho (but I don't think I have stock in the freezer for that). It occurs to me I could use some in beef hor fun because I think we have a steak in the freezer and pad thai noodles in the pantry.
  • chris89topher
    chris89topher Posts: 383 Member
    edited January 7
    acpgee wrote: »
    Celery stir fry using store bought chilli oil, soy, and a few drops of sesame oil. Next time I will slice against the grain instead of julienne. Despite taking a vegetable peeler to the outside of the stalks, the julienne shape still was a little stringy. Tomorrow I will try pickled celery as a side for pad thai, and after that braised celery to go with Pierogi on Saturday.
    go5kefsaxaat.jpeg

    One thing I've never thought of trying is stir fry using celery. That's great idea! I love celery and that sounds like it would be pretty tasty. 👍
  • purplefizzy
    purplefizzy Posts: 591 Member
    hsarj5huj67g.jpg

    Dessert, fizzy style.

    Double cooked ‘oriental beauty’ sweet potato (slow long baked, chilled, resteamed) with pomegranate arils. Added tahini but ate before pic.

    @lemurcat2 My vote for daikon is spiralized thin, added to very hot broth (the boxed ramen or pho starter, or scratch if you’re particularly ambitious.)
    Cilantro, sliced precooked meat or tofu.
    Simple and yum. Daikon is my fave ‘not a noodle’ as it holds up in soups, etc.
  • purplefizzy
    purplefizzy Posts: 591 Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    Ideas needed for my next vegetable glut of mung bean sprouts. The hubby is craving Pad Thai which I promised to make tomorrow. Will not have time to sprout my own mung beans so will buy them from the Asian supermarket which means tons of leftover sprouts.

    Any ideas on what to do with the excess? My typical uses are Korean beansprout namul (blanched, drained, dressed with garlic, salt and sesame oil) or Vietnamese pho (but I don't think I have stock in the freezer for that). It occurs to me I could use some in beef hor fun because I think we have a steak in the freezer and pad thai noodles in the pantry.

    I had a ‘scallion pancake’ type thing once with copious mung bean sprouts cooked in. I remember ginger, scallion, mung bean, carrot shreds, and it had an egg-y batter that prolly also had a starch binder. Was pan fried till quite golden, and I remember some type of sauce. Maybe also sesame seeds? Was at a delicious little KBB spot I used to go to in a terrible strip mall that was always packed. The retail places were run down and meh but the eateries were great.
  • purplefizzy
    purplefizzy Posts: 591 Member
    On a trip to Sainsburys yesterday I came across a lone bag of Jerusalem Artichokes. It had been abandoned in the broccoli trays. I’ve never seen them before in real life and it’s a mystery to me where it came from as I couldn’t find more!

    Anyway, I bought them, of course…always up for something new in the vegetable world.

    Does anyone have any favourite ways with them?

    @BarbaraHelen2013 please update with review and preparation used. I’ve never had them. They were always dang pricey and not ‘eye pretty’ enough to win me over.
  • BarbaraHelen2013
    BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,846 Member
    On a trip to Sainsburys yesterday I came across a lone bag of Jerusalem Artichokes. It had been abandoned in the broccoli trays. I’ve never seen them before in real life and it’s a mystery to me where it came from as I couldn’t find more!

    Anyway, I bought them, of course…always up for something new in the vegetable world.

    Does anyone have any favourite ways with them?

    @BarbaraHelen2013 please update with review and preparation used. I’ve never had them. They were always dang pricey and not ‘eye pretty’ enough to win me over.

    Tasted raw they reminded me a little of Water Chestnuts, but I decided to cook them.

    I went with a recipe I found on Pinterest - sliced thinly, sautéed with mushrooms with garlic, lemon zest, lemon juice and loads of fresh parsley added at the end.

    To be perfectly honest, if someone else had cooked it and given it to me I’d have just thought it was new potatoes. 🤷‍♀️ Nothing special and I had really bad stomach cramps yesterday which I believe can be an issue with Jerusalem Artichokes. Something to do with inulin and it’s effect on your gut biome.

    Not sure yet whether I’ll risk the rest of the bag cooked some other way, the cramps have put me off somewhat!

    Anyway, here’s a picture, with some very good, stupidly low calorie vegan sausages and salad.

    4ihtnn0zyu56.jpeg
  • acpgee
    acpgee Posts: 6,602 Member
    I have never cooked Jerusalem artichokes but have eaten them in restaurants roasted. I always found them pretty similar to potatoes too, but maybe a little sweeter.