Coronavirus prep

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  • ythannah
    ythannah Posts: 4,261 Member
    Cosmetics, tuna and soup stock. That's what seems to be in short supply here.

    Back in 2020 I was seeing huge barren spots in the makeup racks and we're back to that again. I'm assuming a lot of these products are foreign made or with foreign-sourced ingredients/containers.

    Soup stock has been an ongoing thing. I don't use it but my father frequently requested it when I was buying his groceries for him and I think he thought I was lying to him when I told him week after week that there was none. For some reason it's missing again these days, when he's doing his own shopping (with me), and now he sees it for himself.

    Wanted to stock up on canned tuna the other day and not a can to be found. It wasn't even on sale. Not sure if that's a tuna shortage or another aluminum shortage.
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,722 Member
    @kshama2001 We didn't get the 1st storm like you guys did. But we got at least 12" starting last Thursday afternoon and ending Friday mid day. There's enough snow outside now to call it a winter. :)
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,967 Member
    The Whole Foods south of Boston usually has close to 100% mask wearing despite no mandate, but many more people were maskless yesterday. There were some bare spots on the shelves. Sliced cheese, certain types of pasta, and other things, but I can't remember what.
  • bold_rabbit
    bold_rabbit Posts: 1,199 Member
    Got an email this morning that our tests will be here Friday. So weird since we ordered immediately, and many neighbors/friends who ordered a few days later got theirs early last week.

    Got out to the store yesterday and most things were well stocked even after our snow/ice storm. A little low in frozen food (especially fries section) and pasta. I've seen much worse in the past 2 months, so maybe supply chains and worker shortages* are easing here.

    * I noticed several long-term workers in the store who I haven't seen in a while and thought may had left or retired or worse.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,191 Member
    Along the lines of supply chain issues and empty shelves, is anyone noticing the price increases at restaurants? We are still doing take out, or eating outdoors if it's open (no 4 walled tents). Some of our favorite places, like a pub with burgers, tots and good beer are now no longer options. What used to be a $7, then $10 burger is now $17. It is still a mediocre pub burger. At $7 or $10, it might be worth it for us to enjoy sitting outside in their beer garden on a lovely afternoon. At this point, for two people, we can grill our own burgers and buy our own beer. Of course, that means doing the work and being at home, which was the whole point of looking for somewhere to go. I just read in the Sunday NYT about the prices of everything that restaurants are dealing with. I'm not sure how they will survive if the food is the same, but prices increase 30%. :(

    I haven't noticed that big of a jump anywhere here yet, at least for our weekly take out pizza or the hole in the wall teriyaki chicken joint I like for lunch once per week...but we're still pretty backwards when it comes to wages for service people at restaurants. We're still at the federal minimum of $2.13/hr plus tips (except in Santa Fe where eating out is more expensive)...I'm 47, and that's the same rate as when I waited tables in my early 20s. I think a lot of places are increasing wages either on their own or by state law to keep employees...and then couple that with supply chain issues...

    My wife and I really don't eat out much...date night once a month or two and we have 3 or 4 places we really like and they are on the pricier end of the spectrum as it is. We have one scheduled for next weekend so I'll be curious if I notice anything...but haven't noticed much change with our regulars like Village Pizza and Teriyaki Chicken in Foil.

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,967 Member
    edited February 8
    Along the lines of supply chain issues and empty shelves, is anyone noticing the price increases at restaurants? We are still doing take out, or eating outdoors if it's open (no 4 walled tents). Some of our favorite places, like a pub with burgers, tots and good beer are now no longer options. What used to be a $7, then $10 burger is now $17. It is still a mediocre pub burger. At $7 or $10, it might be worth it for us to enjoy sitting outside in their beer garden on a lovely afternoon. At this point, for two people, we can grill our own burgers and buy our own beer. Of course, that means doing the work and being at home, which was the whole point of looking for somewhere to go. I just read in the Sunday NYT about the prices of everything that restaurants are dealing with. I'm not sure how they will survive if the food is the same, but prices increase 30%. :(

    Eating outside on a lovely afternoon is still months away from us here south of Boston :lol:

    When I moved into the old place in 2016, we redid the back yard - removed two huge maple trees that pretty much made it unusable, graded and reseeded, put in a patio, and got nice patio furniture and a stereo. After that, we started eating out less and less.

    We sold that place last fall and I am looking forward to transforming the backyard here.

    There are tons of great restaurants in our new town, but I was not a fan of crowded, noisy restaurants even before the pandemic.

    The pizza place is pricier than our old city but that could just be the new town. I'm alternating between take out pizza and home made crescent roll pizza roll ups.
  • missysippy930
    missysippy930 Posts: 2,572 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Along the lines of supply chain issues and empty shelves, is anyone noticing the price increases at restaurants? We are still doing take out, or eating outdoors if it's open (no 4 walled tents). Some of our favorite places, like a pub with burgers, tots and good beer are now no longer options. What used to be a $7, then $10 burger is now $17. It is still a mediocre pub burger. At $7 or $10, it might be worth it for us to enjoy sitting outside in their beer garden on a lovely afternoon. At this point, for two people, we can grill our own burgers and buy our own beer. Of course, that means doing the work and being at home, which was the whole point of looking for somewhere to go. I just read in the Sunday NYT about the prices of everything that restaurants are dealing with. I'm not sure how they will survive if the food is the same, but prices increase 30%. :(

    Eating outside on a lovely afternoon is still months away from us here south of Boston :lol:

    When I moved into the old place in 2016, we redid the back yard - removed two huge maple trees that pretty much made it unusable, graded and reseeded, put in a patio, and got nice patio furniture and a stereo. After that, we started eating out less and less.

    We sold that place last fall and I am looking forward to transforming the backyard here.

    There are tons of great restaurants in our new town, but I was not a fan of crowded, noisy restaurants even before the pandemic.

    The pizza place is pricier than our old city but that could just be the new town. I'm alternating between take out pizza and home made crescent roll pizza roll ups.

    It was + 42F here (TC metro area) yesterday. They showed people eating outside on the news. Snow is melting. After the coldest January since 2014, I guess, some are enjoying “the warm weather’.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,894 Member
    I haven't noticed restaurant costs being up that much, but I admit I'm not that cost conscious with restaurant food and I've actually decreased my restaurant food quite a bit in the past few months and also tend to vary restaurants enough that I wouldn't notice if a particular place increased.

    Although the numbers you are talking about are much more significant, so this is not intended to be directed at you, the post about restaurant increases reminded me of this, which I found kind of funny (the quote from the Hinsdale man and the should-have-been-expected reaction, I mean):

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/breaking/ct-food-insecurity-hinsdale-burrito-controversy-20220125-xkn56svzxvc6ppd5kodiiomdu4-story.html

    Original piece: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/21/business/fast-food-prices-inflation.html

    I seriously thought the quote from the NYT piece was a parody when I first saw it quoted (before confirming it was a real NYT piece).
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    edited February 9
    Along the lines of supply chain issues and empty shelves, is anyone noticing the price increases at restaurants? We are still doing take out, or eating outdoors if it's open (no 4 walled tents). Some of our favorite places, like a pub with burgers, tots and good beer are now no longer options. What used to be a $7, then $10 burger is now $17. It is still a mediocre pub burger. At $7 or $10, it might be worth it for us to enjoy sitting outside in their beer garden on a lovely afternoon. At this point, for two people, we can grill our own burgers and buy our own beer. Of course, that means doing the work and being at home, which was the whole point of looking for somewhere to go. I just read in the Sunday NYT about the prices of everything that restaurants are dealing with. I'm not sure how they will survive if the food is the same, but prices increase 30%. :(
    I have a friend who owns a Mediterranean restaurant. We stopped there yesterday for takeout and had a long catch-up with him and he said he is having to raise prices by 30% because his wife, who handles the books, pointed out that he is actually losing money with every sale at present. The price increase is entirely because of the increase in the price of ingredients. His staff is just him, wife and daughters, and one extra cook who comes in sometimes so he can have a day off.

    He has a fairly flexible menu and does a lot of last minute purchasing by just running next door to Kroger as opposed to wholesale buying so he is seeing higher costs than a more efficient operation.
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,155 Member
    edited February 9
    Along the lines of supply chain issues and empty shelves, is anyone noticing the price increases at restaurants? We are still doing take out, or eating outdoors if it's open (no 4 walled tents). Some of our favorite places, like a pub with burgers, tots and good beer are now no longer options. What used to be a $7, then $10 burger is now $17. It is still a mediocre pub burger. At $7 or $10, it might be worth it for us to enjoy sitting outside in their beer garden on a lovely afternoon. At this point, for two people, we can grill our own burgers and buy our own beer. Of course, that means doing the work and being at home, which was the whole point of looking for somewhere to go. I just read in the Sunday NYT about the prices of everything that restaurants are dealing with. I'm not sure how they will survive if the food is the same, but prices increase 30%. :(



    I can't imagine that you could get a burger anywhere around here for $7-10 even before the pandemic. How did they even make money on that after overhead and staff? I would say $17 would be a pretty average price for a burger & fries at a pub. Minimum wage for servers just went up to $15 per hour here in January, so I imagine with that and pandemic losses prices will probably go up.

    I expect to pay up to about $80 for an average pub meal for me and my husband, with tax and tip, and wine or beer. If it goes up much more than that I would probably cut back to twice a month (we go about once a week now.) I am in Ontario, so I guess depends on your location.
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,155 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Along the lines of supply chain issues and empty shelves, is anyone noticing the price increases at restaurants? We are still doing take out, or eating outdoors if it's open (no 4 walled tents). Some of our favorite places, like a pub with burgers, tots and good beer are now no longer options. What used to be a $7, then $10 burger is now $17. It is still a mediocre pub burger. At $7 or $10, it might be worth it for us to enjoy sitting outside in their beer garden on a lovely afternoon. At this point, for two people, we can grill our own burgers and buy our own beer. Of course, that means doing the work and being at home, which was the whole point of looking for somewhere to go. I just read in the Sunday NYT about the prices of everything that restaurants are dealing with. I'm not sure how they will survive if the food is the same, but prices increase 30%. :(

    I haven't noticed that big of a jump anywhere here yet, at least for our weekly take out pizza or the hole in the wall teriyaki chicken joint I like for lunch once per week...but we're still pretty backwards when it comes to wages for service people at restaurants. We're still at the federal minimum of $2.13/hr plus tips (except in Santa Fe where eating out is more expensive)...I'm 47, and that's the same rate as when I waited tables in my early 20s. I think a lot of places are increasing wages either on their own or by state law to keep employees...and then couple that with supply chain issues...

    My wife and I really don't eat out much...date night once a month or two and we have 3 or 4 places we really like and they are on the pricier end of the spectrum as it is. We have one scheduled for next weekend so I'll be curious if I notice anything...but haven't noticed much change with our regulars like Village Pizza and Teriyaki Chicken in Foil.

    $2.13? is this a typo?
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Along the lines of supply chain issues and empty shelves, is anyone noticing the price increases at restaurants? We are still doing take out, or eating outdoors if it's open (no 4 walled tents). Some of our favorite places, like a pub with burgers, tots and good beer are now no longer options. What used to be a $7, then $10 burger is now $17. It is still a mediocre pub burger. At $7 or $10, it might be worth it for us to enjoy sitting outside in their beer garden on a lovely afternoon. At this point, for two people, we can grill our own burgers and buy our own beer. Of course, that means doing the work and being at home, which was the whole point of looking for somewhere to go. I just read in the Sunday NYT about the prices of everything that restaurants are dealing with. I'm not sure how they will survive if the food is the same, but prices increase 30%. :(

    I haven't noticed that big of a jump anywhere here yet, at least for our weekly take out pizza or the hole in the wall teriyaki chicken joint I like for lunch once per week...but we're still pretty backwards when it comes to wages for service people at restaurants. We're still at the federal minimum of $2.13/hr plus tips (except in Santa Fe where eating out is more expensive)...I'm 47, and that's the same rate as when I waited tables in my early 20s. I think a lot of places are increasing wages either on their own or by state law to keep employees...and then couple that with supply chain issues...

    My wife and I really don't eat out much...date night once a month or two and we have 3 or 4 places we really like and they are on the pricier end of the spectrum as it is. We have one scheduled for next weekend so I'll be curious if I notice anything...but haven't noticed much change with our regulars like Village Pizza and Teriyaki Chicken in Foil.

    $2.13? is this a typo?

    Nope! Tip wage hasn’t gone up since I was a waitress in high school thirty years ago.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,191 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Along the lines of supply chain issues and empty shelves, is anyone noticing the price increases at restaurants? We are still doing take out, or eating outdoors if it's open (no 4 walled tents). Some of our favorite places, like a pub with burgers, tots and good beer are now no longer options. What used to be a $7, then $10 burger is now $17. It is still a mediocre pub burger. At $7 or $10, it might be worth it for us to enjoy sitting outside in their beer garden on a lovely afternoon. At this point, for two people, we can grill our own burgers and buy our own beer. Of course, that means doing the work and being at home, which was the whole point of looking for somewhere to go. I just read in the Sunday NYT about the prices of everything that restaurants are dealing with. I'm not sure how they will survive if the food is the same, but prices increase 30%. :(

    I haven't noticed that big of a jump anywhere here yet, at least for our weekly take out pizza or the hole in the wall teriyaki chicken joint I like for lunch once per week...but we're still pretty backwards when it comes to wages for service people at restaurants. We're still at the federal minimum of $2.13/hr plus tips (except in Santa Fe where eating out is more expensive)...I'm 47, and that's the same rate as when I waited tables in my early 20s. I think a lot of places are increasing wages either on their own or by state law to keep employees...and then couple that with supply chain issues...

    My wife and I really don't eat out much...date night once a month or two and we have 3 or 4 places we really like and they are on the pricier end of the spectrum as it is. We have one scheduled for next weekend so I'll be curious if I notice anything...but haven't noticed much change with our regulars like Village Pizza and Teriyaki Chicken in Foil.

    $2.13? is this a typo?

    Nope. Many states pay more, but NM is still at $2.13/hr...I believe this legislative session there is a bill that will likely pass to raise it to $2.88/hr for tipped employees.

    It was $2.13 when I waited tables over 25 years ago...this coming change will be the first. The hourly rate plus tips must be equal to the hourly minimum wage of $11.50 per hour. I actually did pretty well for a college student when I waited tables, but I worked in finer dining setting and once I had some tenure made sure I had Friday night shifts, a double on Saturday, and Sunday brunch. One would barely scrape by working at Denny's or something.

    I don't really think it's enough, but relative to many states, NM has a low cost of living. Just as an example, we paid just over $500K for our home four years ago (has since gone up some)...it's over 3,000 sq ft with a pool on an acre of property just outside of Albuquerque. I can see that changing though...we're getting a lot of people moving in from California and Colorado and paying over asking.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,191 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Along the lines of supply chain issues and empty shelves, is anyone noticing the price increases at restaurants? We are still doing take out, or eating outdoors if it's open (no 4 walled tents). Some of our favorite places, like a pub with burgers, tots and good beer are now no longer options. What used to be a $7, then $10 burger is now $17. It is still a mediocre pub burger. At $7 or $10, it might be worth it for us to enjoy sitting outside in their beer garden on a lovely afternoon. At this point, for two people, we can grill our own burgers and buy our own beer. Of course, that means doing the work and being at home, which was the whole point of looking for somewhere to go. I just read in the Sunday NYT about the prices of everything that restaurants are dealing with. I'm not sure how they will survive if the food is the same, but prices increase 30%. :(

    I haven't noticed that big of a jump anywhere here yet, at least for our weekly take out pizza or the hole in the wall teriyaki chicken joint I like for lunch once per week...but we're still pretty backwards when it comes to wages for service people at restaurants. We're still at the federal minimum of $2.13/hr plus tips (except in Santa Fe where eating out is more expensive)...I'm 47, and that's the same rate as when I waited tables in my early 20s. I think a lot of places are increasing wages either on their own or by state law to keep employees...and then couple that with supply chain issues...

    My wife and I really don't eat out much...date night once a month or two and we have 3 or 4 places we really like and they are on the pricier end of the spectrum as it is. We have one scheduled for next weekend so I'll be curious if I notice anything...but haven't noticed much change with our regulars like Village Pizza and Teriyaki Chicken in Foil.

    $2.13? is this a typo?

    Nope. Many states pay more, but NM is still at $2.13/hr...I believe this legislative session there is a bill that will likely pass to raise it to $2.88/hr for tipped employees.

    Server wage used to be lower than minimum wage here - $12.55 vs $15 but it just went up to $15 (so equal to minimum wage for everyone else) on January 1st.

    Now I can see why burgers are only $7 in some places.

    Tipping culture is so weird - I wish it would just be eliminated and everyone just get paid a fair wage. My daughter worked in Australia for a year, and almost 10 years ago I think she was making $20 ish as a server - no tipping.

    I honestly haven't seen a $7 burger anywhere here in a very long time other than fast food type of places...combo meal (burger, medium fries, medium drink) at Blake's (local fast food) is $9. There are a few breweries and pubs my wife and I like and the average is $13-$15 for a burger or similar type of grilled sandwich...comes with some kind of side as well obviously. The cheapest sandwich on the menu at the Corrales Bistro is $10 and it's a veggie wrap. The only things in the $7-$10 range are appetizers. This isn't anything new though. I've always thought eating out was pretty expensive. Definitely more of an indulgence kind of thing than regular occurrence for my family.