No Surprise - Sucralose is Bad for You

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Replies

  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 9,724 Member
    No I don't think I could find a reputable study that says it does.

    I am not saying it does at all, quite the opposite.

    That was my whole point, diabetic associations would not suggest it if it did.

    Perhaps I should of posted that as a statement rather than a rhetorical question.

    Yeah, sorry, I didn't mean you specifically I meant anyone. I should have worded that differently, for sure. I was agreeing with you, with just a little more detail, that's all. Cheers
  • thesawyerbunch
    thesawyerbunch Posts: 22 Member
    Yeah, I've known that sucralose and aspartame are bad for years; that's why I avoid them.
  • Terrania24
    Terrania24 Posts: 11 Member
    The World Health Organization advises against the use of ALL non-sugar sweeteners. They advise this because their systematic review of available evidence suggests that "there may be potential undesirable effects from long-term use of non-sugar sweeteners, such as an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and mortality in adults." Their advice applies to everyone except those with pre-existing diabetes.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 8,870 Member
    and yet Diabetic Associations do not advise such - because getting BSL's down and losing weight is FAR more important than some insy hypothetical risks
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 8,870 Member
    A couple of quotes from linked WHO article

    "Because the link observed in the evidence between NSS and disease outcomes might be confounded by baseline characteristics of study participants and complicated patterns of NSS use, the recommendation has been assessed as conditional, following WHO processes for developing guidelines."

    "Replacing free sugars with NSS does not help with weight control in the long term. People need to consider other ways to reduce free sugars intake, such as consuming food with naturally occurring sugars, like fruit, or unsweetened food and beverages,” says Francesco Branca, WHO Director for Nutrition and Food Safety. "NSS are not essential dietary factors and have no nutritional value. People should reduce the sweetness of the diet altogether, starting early in life, to improve their health."


    and yet many people, including me, have found long term weight management and BSL control using artificial sweeteners - not sure how they can dismiss that obvious reality

    I don't think anyone claims artifical sweeteners are nutritionally benificial and of course one could also re train one's taste bud to prefer things unsweetened - if one wants to.

    But nobody eats them on their own or as a complete food - so not sure why it matters that they have no nutritional value.

    and sure, arguably it is better for those starting early in life to get used to having things not sweet - but that doesnt help adults with established tastes
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 8,870 Member
    edited June 2023
    Yeah, I've known that sucralose and aspartame are bad for years; that's why I avoid them.

    Have you read this thread https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/1308408/why-aspartame-isnt-scary/p1

    Written by a biochemist - so somebody who knows this stuff and doesnt just make blanket unsubstantiated claims

  • Retroguy2000
    Retroguy2000 Posts: 1,377 Member
    edited June 2023
    @paperpudding

    Re this,

    "Replacing free sugars with NSS does not help with weight control in the long term. People need to consider other ways to reduce free sugars intake, such as consuming food with naturally occurring sugars, like fruit, or unsweetened food and beverages,” says Francesco Branca, WHO Director for Nutrition and Food Safety. "NSS are not essential dietary factors and have no nutritional value. People should reduce the sweetness of the diet altogether, starting early in life, to improve their health."

    Sure, that sounds like an ideal. Recommending to start early in life is a bit too late for most obese adults though. For those who are starting from an obese position, I find it hard to believe that NSS doesn't help with weight control. Just the effort of switching from sugar to NSS shows a level of diet commitment, which is likely rewarded with some weight loss.
  • springlering62
    springlering62 Posts: 7,265 Member
    edited June 2023
    I’m just here to confess, I just polished off a whole box of See’s chocolates.

    I will very happily return to my zero cal sweeteners tomorrow and they will still be satisfying and taste good. (Man, I should buy stock in Jordan’s.)

    No regrets, my weekly calorie average still remains well below my daily goal, and I will not burn in either sugar hell or the artificial sweetener one either.

    You can preach at me all you want but as I’ve said before, the benefits of the 100 pounds lost far offsets the “risk” of artificial sweeteners used to get here and maintain.

    And the WHO is not who I would use as my first source for information. But that’s me.

    It really bugs me that so many people come here and preach the benefits of this meal plan, that influencer, some so called detox, or the diet craze du jour and then lose their mind over artificial sweeteners.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 8,870 Member
    edited June 2023
    ^^ Yes, exactly.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,400 Member
    More peer reviewed study on the "chemical" in question needs to be performed to get a more concise conclusion.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • rileysowner
    rileysowner Posts: 8,020 Member
    Terrania24 wrote: »
    The World Health Organization advises against the use of ALL non-sugar sweeteners. They advise this because their systematic review of available evidence suggests that "there may be potential undesirable effects from long-term use of non-sugar sweeteners, such as an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and mortality in adults." Their advice applies to everyone except those with pre-existing diabetes.

    This particular recommendation from the WHO for me is the final nail in the coffin for any trust in what they put out. There are so many issues with the study this is based on the first of which is it lumps all non-sugar sweeteners together, second it is based on observational studies which are unable to establish causation. Third, this study, as much as it claims to have not done this, seems to be suffering from reverse causation. There is more. Alan Aragon did a good critique of this announcement showings its abundant weaknesses.
  • rileysowner
    rileysowner Posts: 8,020 Member
    @paperpudding

    Re this,

    "Replacing free sugars with NSS does not help with weight control in the long term. People need to consider other ways to reduce free sugars intake, such as consuming food with naturally occurring sugars, like fruit, or unsweetened food and beverages,” says Francesco Branca, WHO Director for Nutrition and Food Safety. "NSS are not essential dietary factors and have no nutritional value. People should reduce the sweetness of the diet altogether, starting early in life, to improve their health."

    Sure, that sounds like an ideal. Recommending to start early in life is a bit too late for most obese adults though. For those who are starting from an obese position, I find it hard to believe that NSS doesn't help with weight control. Just the effort of switching from sugar to NSS shows a level of diet commitment, which is likely rewarded with some weight loss.

    Part of the issue is that the evidence from clinical practices is not generally included in studies like this because it doesn't meet their criteria. There are obesity clinicians who do disagree strongly with the claim that NNS do not assist in both short-term loss and long-term maintenance of weight. The issue is not the NNS, but the difficulties of dealing with generally all of a person's life experiences, habits, and practices that got them overweight in the first place. Trying to fix that is a long-term, may I say it, rest of their life (and mine) task that will have many who go through stages of failure.