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Do you run slow? Then you might be doing it right!

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mtaratoot
mtaratoot Posts: 13,678 Member
I know some people eschew running because of its impact on the body, especially knees and hips. I have friends that tell me I shouldn't do it because I will inevitably get injured. To be honest, I got out of the habit at some point and will get back into it.

I have never been a fast runner. Well, my last two or three years playing Ultimate I gained enough speed to be able to get open against a much younger opponent, and on defense I could keep up with them. That was after I lost weight, and it was really fun.

So yeah, I run slow when I run. It never bothered me. Just the other day, a friend shared an article that says running slow is great. If you've been thinking about starting to run, and if your doctor doesn't have any concerns about you starting, maybe slow running is for you!

One thing I focus on to prevent injury when running is keeping a shorter stride length. I'm pretty sure I learned this from McDougall's awesome book, "Born to Run." If you haven't read it, it's a good read even if you don't run. Good story. If I remember correctly, McDougall describes how modern running shoes gave runners more speed from cushioned soles, but that increased stride length resulting in higher injury rates.

Replies

  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,635 Member
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    I'm a certified slow runner, but I also have an inborn muscle problem (I can't run up the tiniest inclines, and stepping from street to sidewalk is tiresome). It's frustrating at times, but on the other hand I'm only running against myself. So far I've not injured any joints though when running. Did a few flies when stumping over something (mostly my feet), and badly fractured one bone when hit by a cycling and adding clumsiness to the mix. But I guess the same might as well happen when walking to the store around the corner.
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 6,457 Member
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    Another certified slow runner here. I started out running at a speed I could have walked. After 4 years, I'm at a 'real' running speed, but still my Garmin scolds me for running too much in a low aerobic zone :smiley:
    In reality I should slow down more, especially now: after a period with minimal running due to an injury, I can feel I'm less fit and my HR is quite a bit higher, beyond zone 2.
  • herblovinmom
    herblovinmom Posts: 385 Member
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    My wrestler son once told me that I run as fast as he walks so I take it I’m a slow runner. That being said I used to sprint back in school so I can run fast just in short bursts. I’m slowly getting back into running/jogging, not sure the difference between those two. I mostly just walk for now but I am able to walk/jog interval again and keep up with my 6 yr olds on their bikes 👍
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,635 Member
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    Lietchi wrote: »
    Another certified slow runner here. I started out running at a speed I could have walked. After 4 years, I'm at a 'real' running speed, but still my Garmin scolds me for running too much in a low aerobic zone :smiley:
    In reality I should slow down more, especially now: after a period with minimal running due to an injury, I can feel I'm less fit and my HR is quite a bit higher, beyond zone 2.

    Haha, all my runs are at least tempo runs. I did have exercise tests and know what my training zones should be. But it's just not possible to run at low intensity even at slower than walking pace. I'm always near or over the anaerobic threshold. Which is why running faster apart from small intervals doesn't work for me.
  • Sett2023
    Sett2023 Posts: 158 Member
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    Can I ask you experts what you think / know about running in place? Thanks :-)
  • nossmf
    nossmf Posts: 10,042 Member
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    Ha! So there, high school gym coach! I was right, you were wrong to call me slow!

    (I actually earned my letterman's jacket as both a sprinter in track and running 5k cross-country, so have a history of running...thirty years ago...)
  • nossmf
    nossmf Posts: 10,042 Member
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    The standard military basic training running pace would be considered a slow run, but they keep it going for miles on end, all while chanting in unison.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,635 Member
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    nossmf wrote: »
    The standard military basic training running pace would be considered a slow run, but they keep it going for miles on end, all while chanting in unison.

    How slow is slow? I bet I'm still running slower because at times walkers overtake me 😅🙈
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 13,678 Member
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    What did the slug say to the turtle?
    "Why are you going so FAST?!?!?"
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,635 Member
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    mtaratoot wrote: »
    What did the slug say to the turtle?
    "Why are you going so FAST?!?!?"

    I'm the slug! Actually, when people are blocking the sidwalk I always shout "ring ring (like a bike), careful: snail runner passing!"
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 9,635 Member
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    mtaratoot wrote: »
    I know some people eschew running because of its impact on the body, especially knees and hips. I have friends that tell me I shouldn't do it because I will inevitably get injured.

    People can have individual exceptions from pre-existing conditions, like @yirara, but setting those folks aside for this reply. Most non-healthcare people think running is harmful for knees and hips, and most healthcare providers think it is healthy for knees and hips according to a cool 2022 study by Escuiler.

    That's "perception." Actual knee/hip health was researched by Alentorn-Geli in 2017, casual runners had the healthist joints compared to the other group.

    When a person advises against running check in with them if they are a licensed healthcare provider, or currently in a regular running routine. If not....try to get them out running with you. ;)

    I can add some personal information on this. Been running for nearly 10 years. With Ehlers-Danlos (thus instable joints and very stretchy muscles, skin, everything). Any running injury I ever had was due to general clumsiness and falling over something or not lifting up my feet enough, due to running with too poorly maintained toe nails (don't ask), or bra chaffing. Never due to knee or hip problems ❤️
  • us3simpson
    us3simpson Posts: 4 Member
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    I'm a slow runner but I run for me. I have just started a goal running 3 days a week now. Too short runs which are 2 mi and then a longer run. Which right now is 3 mi. I run with an old dog and so he's only allowed to do the 2 mi. Sometimes. I'll do a little sprint in there but on the whole I just enjoy running at my pace listening to music. I have been on to sing out loud once in a while too lol!
  • kathrynrussell2
    kathrynrussell2 Posts: 6 Member
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    I'm also an extremely slow runner but it's all about the "bounce," which you can only get from running.