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Depression and Weight Loss

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  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    tinger12. What a brave and insightful person you are. Let's all create a synergy between us to move us past the old dusty habits that our brains have become used to. I am learning (so slowly I admit) separate the depressed thoughts and flat mood from the necessary healthy choices we can make. We all deserve to have healthy and nice bodies and for me now, my new body lives in the new choices I am about to make. He lives on the walks I will take along the foreshow I intend to walk along each morning by the Coral Sea, he lives at the gym where I will sweat for 150 minutes a week (research says this is the amount of time we need to spend to avoid Alzheimers ...did I mention the research about Alzheimers?), he lives in the increased protein and low carb meals, and finally in my heart where there is a healthy man just patiently waiting to emerge. I am so grateful to all of you for writing on this thread. Okay...off to work.
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    It is so hard to know how mood changes and food work together. So many patterns and automatic responses become established over time and although the mind knows "better", the habits run the show even before the internal debate has a chance to occur. It is kind of like the decision is made in some sort of dissociative manner as if it is someone else who is reaching for the sugary food or salty chips. I know that may seem like an excuse and perhaps it is, but awareness is not always available when I want it. The "why bother nothing will ever change" part of me, created my the depressed state of mind quite comfortable opens the door to irresponsible and irreversible consequences. I do not choose to be Bulimic although I have wondered if getting rid of the food once I have eaten it would be a short-cut way to not have to make any changes. I think this may be typical of how I try and avoid the more obvious requirements of dealing with the discomfort of responsible food selection.
    I would like to know how you find the power to be disciplined? What strategies do you use?
    Did you hear about the little kids in the Psych experiment in which they are left in a room with one marshmallow on a plate and the researcher says that if the child waits for the researcher to return, the child can have two marshmallows. If the child eats the one marshmallow any sooner that is all he/she gets. You can easily see how some kids distract themselves quite cleverly to keep their minds busy until they have passed enough time until the researcher returns. Then there are the kids from my tribe. Poor marshmallow doesn't stand a chance. Is it never too late to learn? I am going to practice the experiment during my day today. One pink glazed, fluffy, yummy marshmallow on a plate beside my computer. Let's see how long it lasts. What are the Vegas odds?
    I will let you know tomorrow
    Keep the faith folks and write to me and let me know which type of kid are you? Be honest


  • dubirddubird Member Posts: 1,854 Member Member Posts: 1,854 Member
    Have you talked to your doctor yet? They may be able to recommend other options or therapy if you need it. I had to be put on meds, but most of the time, mild depression can be controled other ways. Depression hits everyone differently. I'm not an emotional eater myself, but I am a habit snacker. I've had to find new things to do with my hands to keep me from just going through a bag of chips without realizing how much I'm eating! Exercise didn't help me, but I know that there are people that it helps so definatly try that. Also, do as much in the sun as you can. Raising vitiman D levels can be helpful, and at least for me, seems to work best when it's sun instead of suppliments.

    About the only other advice I can give is to find things that you can do that you enjoy, espically if it's making something. Being able to make something that others enjoy is a good antidote for a bad day for me.
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Well my silent tribe, hope you are all looking after yourselves. Marshmallow lived through the day and night and isn't so fluffy now. Oxygen is actually a very harsh gas and turns what seems to be a benign innocent square of pleasure into a rock hard blob of yuck. I wonder what my "drugs" of choice distill down to and turn into when they go from the manufacturer's facade of looking great and yummy to digested mush in the guts. If I think about this objectively and vividly, I notice myself thinking more closely with regards to my food choices. Of course my pal;,the depressed part of me might say that that way of thinking is true for any food so why bother with yet another irrelevant strategy? But you know, for me, I kind of think my body smiles when it doesn't have to burn a crap load of sugar and freak out with oils it never had to manage in our ancestors bellies. Okay body, today you get treated with awareness and respect. I'll think about what I put in you and what happens to the food once it's gobbled mass.
    Off to the gym.
    Stay focused gang. See you a few grams (less) from now.
    S
  • WBB55WBB55 Member Posts: 4,131 Member Member Posts: 4,131 Member
    every day brings new opportunities to make better choices than yesterday and/or lay the foundation to make even better choices in the future.
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Exercise and Depression


    Besides lifting your mood, regular exercise offers other health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, protecting against heart disease and cancer, and boosting self-esteem. How often or intensely you need to exercise to alleviate depression is not clear, but for general health, experts advise getting half an hour to an hour of moderate exercise, such as brisk walking, on all or most days of the week.

    Read more: http://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/exercise-and-depression-report-excerpt

    i agree 100%. i have "managed" my depression with prescriptions and exercise and eating wisely(when i can muster it)...... can you recommend how to handle injuries? i've done it in the past..... now, i'm not doing so good. i haven't run consistently since early July. i switched to bicycling. now, i've been told (by a physical therapist) to not run, bike, play tennis or garden. mentally, i'm a sinking ship. i'm going to yoga twice a week. walking doesn't generally ease my depression symptoms. even swimming messes with my hips because of my pelvic weaknesses and poor movement patterns. I'll be grateful for any ideas that might help keep me out of this black hole.
    :)
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    kshama2001, I am guessing you need to work closely with a doctor you trust and experts who can advise regarding the best exercises you can do which consider your injuries. Adjustment issues are enormously challenging following serious life changes and Depression is often a close companion when we are not ready yet to accept the limitations imposed by circumstances beyond our control. Take matters slowly and consider your body as a new friend that you have to get to know. There will be activities what you can do that at first won't be anything like what you are used to but the brain changes itself. We can adjust and adapt if given the chance.
    Yoga is great so keep that up. There may be experts in other forums here that are knowledgable about alternative physical activities. I will take a look around. Let's compare notes.
    Stay focused and remember that everything changes.
    S
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    thank you, shelleygold. I was quoting kshama2001..... i am the desperate question asker. I appreciate your kind words, and the reminder that i can adapt. physically, i know i will.... but my brain is a bugger! :)
    yes, everything changes. i knew i would have to give up vigorous exercise eventually, but sheesh, i'm only 46! as for my head, I haven't tried ECT or vagal nerve stimulation, and there is a magnetic therapy out there too, although not covered by insurance. so all hope is not lost! i have had "treatment resistant depression" all of my adult life, and sometimes it just gets old.
    thank you, again, for taking the time to reach out. it really does mean a lot to me.
    Myra
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Hi group.
    I was thinking the other day that there should be a food section in the supermarket for folks with mental health issues. Hmmmm. After all we have ethics covered, Kosher, Halel .
    Let's give this some thought.
    What would you put on the shelves?
    Let's brainstorm.

    Look forward to your ideas
    S
  • Yi5hedr3Yi5hedr3 Member, Premium Posts: 2,696 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,696 Member
    Take vitamin B complex and fish oil. No more depression.
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Yi5hedr3 wrote: »
    Take vitamin B complex and fish oil. No more depression.

  • herculean1982herculean1982 Member Posts: 29 Member Member Posts: 29 Member
    Yi5hedr3 wrote: »
    Take vitamin B complex and fish oil. No more depression.

    Wow thanks doc you should tell the world!!!
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Member Posts: 11,234 Member Member Posts: 11,234 Member
    Yi5hedr3 wrote: »
    Take vitamin B complex and fish oil. No more depression.

    no
    actually it made my depression worse.

    exercise does not cure my depression. it helps keep it manageable. I may always need additional medical care to function

    what gets me going when i've hit a funk is my dog. She does care about me but only so much until I've been on my butt too long or under the covers too long and need to take her out. And getting outside helps me get outside myself.
  • WBB55WBB55 Member Posts: 4,131 Member Member Posts: 4,131 Member
    Yi5hedr3 wrote: »
    Take vitamin B complex and fish oil. No more depression.

    That is a very simplistic view of physical and neurochemical imbalances. I agree a healthy diet that includes vitamins and unsaturated fats can definitely help support a brain that's healing, but to claim B complex and fish oil cures clinical depression is a bit naive.
  • zyxstzyxst Member Posts: 9,132 Member Member Posts: 9,132 Member
    Yi5hedr3 wrote: »
    Take vitamin B complex and fish oil. No more depression.
    You're one of those people who tell those with depression to "just get over it", aren't you?
    hair.gif
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Thanks for your suggestion. I'm fairly sure that nutrition impacts mental health in many ways so ensuring that the body gets what it needs is important. It is also important to consider that there is never just one source of Depression and it is rather disrespectful to individuals who experience this devastating condition to imply there is a quick fix. I suggest that you read peoples' thoughts carefully and broaden your understanding. Thank you for contributing. All thoughts are welcome.
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Member Posts: 3,267 Member Member Posts: 3,267 Member
    68myra wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Exercise and Depression


    Besides lifting your mood, regular exercise offers other health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, protecting against heart disease and cancer, and boosting self-esteem. How often or intensely you need to exercise to alleviate depression is not clear, but for general health, experts advise getting half an hour to an hour of moderate exercise, such as brisk walking, on all or most days of the week.

    Read more: http://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/exercise-and-depression-report-excerpt

    i agree 100%. i have "managed" my depression with prescriptions and exercise and eating wisely(when i can muster it)...... can you recommend how to handle injuries? i've done it in the past..... now, i'm not doing so good. i haven't run consistently since early July. i switched to bicycling. now, i've been told (by a physical therapist) to not run, bike, play tennis or garden. mentally, i'm a sinking ship. i'm going to yoga twice a week. walking doesn't generally ease my depression symptoms. even swimming messes with my hips because of my pelvic weaknesses and poor movement patterns. I'll be grateful for any ideas that might help keep me out of this black hole.
    :)

    Is rowing an option? My go to's when injured are stationary cycling, rowing, swimming, and weight lifting for whatever body parts can handle it.

    Btw, whether diagnosed or undiagnosed, I suspect depression frequently factors into weight gain. There may be a limited number of people who respond to threads like this, but many more who may read it and benefit.

  • KimegatronKimegatron Member Posts: 772 Member Member Posts: 772 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Exercise and Depression

    ... A review of studies stretching back to 1981 concluded that regular exercise can improve mood in people with mild to moderate depression. It also may play a supporting role in treating severe depression.

    ...A study published in 2005 found that walking fast for about 35 minutes a day five times a week or 60 minutes a day three times a week had a significant influence on mild to moderate depression symptoms. Walking fast for only 15 minutes a day five times a week or doing stretching exercises three times a week did not help as much. (These exercise lengths were calculated for someone who weighs about 150 pounds. If you weigh more, longer exercise times apply, while the opposite is true if you weigh less than 150 pounds.)

    How does exercise relieve depression? For many years, experts have known that exercise enhances the action of endorphins, chemicals that circulate throughout the body. Endorphins improve natural immunity and reduce the perception of pain. They may also serve to improve mood. Another theory is that exercise stimulates the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which may directly improve mood.

    Besides lifting your mood, regular exercise offers other health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, protecting against heart disease and cancer, and boosting self-esteem. How often or intensely you need to exercise to alleviate depression is not clear, but for general health, experts advise getting half an hour to an hour of moderate exercise, such as brisk walking, on all or most days of the week.

    Read more: http://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/exercise-and-depression-report-excerpt

    You know... I never even thought about it, but I have been a lot happier with myself, loving myself more, since I started walking. I am clinically depressed, was diagnosed at like 18 or 19 (32 now). They almost classified me as manic depressive/bi-polar, but I told them that I am just really angry 24/7. It was life being influential, and self hate, so after more and more therapy, they realized that I'm just a sad little puppy. But yeah, I am so much more happy since I started doing this over the Summer! Part of it is feeling good for myself (pain is getting better, I feel stronger, I'm faster, it just makes my body feel GOOD), part of it is being so proud of myself for not quitting, because I'm a quitter, boy am I! Part of it is being happy that I'm helping my dog be happy and healthy, too. I have always heard exercise makes you happy, the endorphins, yadda yadda... but it never actually clicked.
    edited September 2015
  • tinger12tinger12 Member Posts: 62 Member Member Posts: 62 Member
    Yi5hedr3 wrote: »
    Take vitamin B complex and fish oil. No more depression.

    If it was that simple I would have recovered from my life long depression 30 years ago. Garbage science is just garbage.
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    68myra wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Exercise and Depression


    Besides lifting your mood, regular exercise offers other health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, protecting against heart disease and cancer, and boosting self-esteem. How often or intensely you need to exercise to alleviate depression is not clear, but for general health, experts advise getting half an hour to an hour of moderate exercise, such as brisk walking, on all or most days of the week.

    Read more: http://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/exercise-and-depression-report-excerpt

    i agree 100%. i have "managed" my depression with prescriptions and exercise and eating wisely(when i can muster it)...... can you recommend how to handle injuries? i've done it in the past..... now, i'm not doing so good. i haven't run consistently since early July. i switched to bicycling. now, i've been told (by a physical therapist) to not run, bike, play tennis or garden. mentally, i'm a sinking ship. i'm going to yoga twice a week. walking doesn't generally ease my depression symptoms. even swimming messes with my hips because of my pelvic weaknesses and poor movement patterns. I'll be grateful for any ideas that might help keep me out of this black hole.
    :)

    Is rowing an option? My go to's when injured are stationary cycling, rowing, swimming, and weight lifting for whatever body parts can handle it.

    Btw, whether diagnosed or undiagnosed, I suspect depression frequently factors into weight gain. There may be a limited number of people who respond to threads like this, but many more who may read it and benefit.

    Goldthistime... I do not have expertise in the area of human physiology but I know that injury, like weight issues, seriously influence mental health. The limitations to life-style, and quality of life impacted by injury ( and the pain that accompanies) contributes to how we judge ourselves and the frustrations we feel when we just cannot be the person we were before. This is also true for weight issues We have a judgement in our minds about what our bodies should look like and how we ought to be, and we are constantly putting ourselves down and making ourselves feel miserable. If our bodies cannot do what we would like, we have to face the challenges imposed and do our best to learn what the new capacity means. This is reality. Working closely with experts who know how to offer alternative exercises and accessories or adaptations to conventional equipment may be what we need to do. I do not think there are ever short cuts to effective problem solving. I know that my Depression, at times, creates a mood of despair and hopelessness which makes thinking, planning and problem-solving almost beyond my capabilities. My interest in starting this discussion with the wonderful people here is to create an energy source of faith and optimism that we can learn together to improve our mood and face what we need to face. But even this way of thinking won't solve the real life problems of chronic pain, injury and obesity. There is research, data, science, and legitimate experiences which we have to investigate and learn about to increase our choices. That's the deal. So....learn how your body behaves when you challenge it but also shift your thinking from any judgement or criticism of yourself and get down to business in terms of what is working and what else might be worth trying.
    I know I am not be helpful with the specific question of what exercises etc. Perhaps other people here may fill in that gap.
    Hope my thoughts are helpful nevertheless.
    Shel
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