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Depression and Weight Loss

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  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    wow, the last two posts were powerful for me. I have been really struggling lately because my favorite anti-depressant strategy has been unavailable. sooooooo, i guess what i've learned about myself is: i don't have enough adequate strategies! I read about Dr. Frankyl's experiences in a huff post article online about a month ago and thought to myself: i need to read that book someday! so thanks for reminding me about that.

    socializing and feeling productive..... two GREAT ideas i agree that "help" but i've never put them down in writing, until now. so, thanks for THAT too!

    i was "forced" to socialize this past weekend, even though i really didn't feel up to it. it took me out of my own mental "stuff" for a while, which always helps ease the worst of depression. perhaps i'm on an upswing. even without exercise.
    with a little luck, i'll be more active on this thread in the coming week. :)
  • 717Shelly717Shelly Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
    I don't have anything to add to this thread. But I wanted to thank you all for your posts. I've really been struggling lately and found this thread by chance. It was exactly what I needed. Thanks to everyone for sharing their suggestions and strategies. I have read some things that I will definitely start using. Its true that you never know who is reading and who may benefit from your words.
  • KT_3009KT_3009 Member Posts: 1,046 Member Member Posts: 1,046 Member
    I don't have depression but I do have quite severe anxiety and for me I either over eat when stressed or I don't have an appetite at all. My last panic attack last week has made my appetite pretty much non-existent so I'm now trying to add in high calorie foods in small doses to try and reach my calorie intake.. Exercise always helps to create an environment where you aren't thinking as much either with depression and anxiety, but make sure you choose and exercise routine which you enjoy and would want to go back to :)
  • kiela64kiela64 Member Posts: 1,448 Member Member Posts: 1,448 Member
    Ok Team!
    I'm back. Must have been the B6 and Fish Oil( if only it was that simple).
    Hit a road bump but that is life. It's interesting how the mind works. Just felt so dark, alone, fat, judged and hopeless. It was triggered by a situation which required problem solving rather than emotion but it took me a bit to get there. I'm not a big fan of wading through past impacts because that can be seen as somewhere between indulgent and making excuses. We are all victims and all survivors. We are all weakened by life and the strengthened by how we move through our challenges.
    So... I invite my tribe to write one challenge they have had recently and what helped and what didn't help?
    For me, the challenge was judgement and exclusion by others. What didn't help was blaming myself and inflating the issue. What helped was:
    1. Talking about my feelings
    2. Letting myself go through the pain
    3. Confronting and problem solving
    4. And writing to you.

    Your turn

    A recent challenge was some very, very harsh criticism I wasn't expecting around my creative work by someone I look up to and admire. It came at a very inopportune time, and I'm still not over it. What helped was:

    1. First, NOT talking about it was the best thing. I waited, cried, and sat with it until I could reorganize my thinking away from catastrophizing and universal statements (eg. I suck and can't do anything and should quit, my life is meaningless and useless, etc etc).
    2. Then talking about it in a heavily distanced manner, to see how other people picked it apart and were not emotional around it (seeing the other persons side, etc).
    3. Humour. Making jokes about it, being exaggerated, has really helped me avoid completely spiralling. I kept thinking of this moment in Friends With Benefits that has always made me laugh, and felt really applicable
    da3ebc938be4e83645a0330a280361df.gif


    I still haven't really dealt with it, but I have been able to keep working on other things and not start a spiral of hopelessness that tends to end in hiding at home from my work and eating everything. So that's a win! :) What hasn't helped is continuing to hold onto it, and still letting some catastrophizing thoughts stick with me as little irritating "suggestions" from the part of myself that likes to tear me down. Need to squash that. But I'm still pleased with how I handled it, because I was already not doing well and I could have easily spiralled.

    edited October 2015
  • BethMilledgeBethMilledge Member Posts: 368 Member Member Posts: 368 Member
    I've also been very depressed. I got out of an engagement with the love of my like at the end of June.
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    I've also been very depressed. I got out of an engagement with the love of my like at the end of June.

    I'm sorry for your loss. Hang in there! I try my best to remember: 'this too shall pass'
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    KAE612: congratulations on handling the harsh criticism without a downward spiral! :) i, for one, appreciate you sharing this experience.
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    I have been following a thread which implies that once a person becomes "fat" he/she is doomed to remain "fat".
    I find it fascinating that people show their deeper values as they vote for either side of this rather futile hypothesis. Like mental health, weight is due to many variables. I think we need to trust that we can change our bodies and our minds with clear choices and healthy decision making... in the context of self love and acceptance.
    What do you think?
    S
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Member Posts: 11,234 Member Member Posts: 11,234 Member
    hi all
    i've been going thru some stressful outside situations which bring my depression and anxiety to a head.
    I do try to tell people what i need. space, time to think it over but not all people respect those requests.
    When i run and/or walk the dog, i try to sort things out.
    When i teach yoga, we always start with a seated meditation and i talk about using a " brush" to sweep away anxiety and stress and that which we cannot control. And opening our minds to the light and joy of the world. It helps me and the students say they enjoy it as well.
  • kiela64kiela64 Member Posts: 1,448 Member Member Posts: 1,448 Member
    68myra wrote: »
    KAE612: congratulations on handling the harsh criticism without a downward spiral! :) i, for one, appreciate you sharing this experience.

    Thank you. I haven't done so well afterwards (I had a bit of a spiral the last few days, unfortunately) but I still think there's something to be learned from how I managed to at least hold it off until I finished an important task (studying for and completing a midterm) that was immediate. I'm hoping to remember this for the future.
    I have been following a thread which implies that once a person becomes "fat" he/she is doomed to remain "fat".
    I find it fascinating that people show their deeper values as they vote for either side of this rather futile hypothesis. Like mental health, weight is due to many variables. I think we need to trust that we can change our bodies and our minds with clear choices and healthy decision making... in the context of self love and acceptance.
    What do you think?
    S

    I agree. I weighed in on that thread, and I still stand by my hypothesis. That there are many root causes for weight, and if they are not addressed it is very difficult to keep it off. Along with the cultural misunderstanding of how weight gain and loss occurs (caloric surplus/deficit). I also think that by using the word "fat" we undermine the successes of people simply becoming "less fat" by moving down a class of obesity, or becoming "overweight" instead of obese. I still think that's a win that needs to be acknowledged.
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    I have been following a thread which implies that once a person becomes "fat" he/she is doomed to remain "fat".
    I find it fascinating that people show their deeper values as they vote for either side of this rather futile hypothesis. Like mental health, weight is due to many variables. I think we need to trust that we can change our bodies and our minds with clear choices and healthy decision making... in the context of self love and acceptance.
    What do you think?
    S

    i apologize for being flippant, BUT.....
    whomever implies that "once a person becomes fat they are doomed to remain...." needs to take their crystal ball to the shop, cause it's broken.

    thats what i think :)
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    moyer566 wrote: »
    hi all
    i've been going thru some stressful outside situations which bring my depression and anxiety to a head.
    I do try to tell people what i need. space, time to think it over but not all people respect those requests.
    When i run and/or walk the dog, i try to sort things out.
    When i teach yoga, we always start with a seated meditation and i talk about using a " brush" to sweep away anxiety and stress and that which we cannot control. And opening our minds to the light and joy of the world. It helps me and the students say they enjoy it as well.

    my yoga teacher says something similar and i enjoy it too :)... for me, personally, the mental aspects of yoga are more beneficial than the physical. (but i'll take both, hehe)
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 25,111 Member Member Posts: 25,111 Member
    kae612 wrote: »
    Everything moves together, my anxiety and depression and eating. They cycle together, and right now they're all up :( it makes me feel so tired. What do you guys do when you just want to stop trying?

    I force myself to exercise. I give myself permission to stop if I need to. (I never do.) I do modify on low energy days, for example, I will skip the Sun Salutation part of my yoga practice or break off gardening sooner, etc.

    I guess I am fortunate that exercise always changes my state. Simple things like taking a shower does too.
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I guess I am fortunate that exercise always changes my state. Simple things like taking a shower does too.
    I always considered myself fortunate that exercise works every time for me too! now i'm looking for alternatives to exercise...... i read earlier that just smiling actually benefits your mood! so, here i am, smiling at my computer.... and considering taking a shower. :)

    btw, kshama2001, you couldn't have pegged it better: no matter how much i tried to modify, yogaX just increased my hip pain. My physical therapist nailed it: the dr. had the right idea, wrong approach. I have backed off EVERYTHING, including yoga, and she has devised a tiny, baby squat-like exercise to help me focus on the first needed step. so, there you go. i shall keep trying. She also used something called "dry needling" on me at my last appointment. i'm keeping my fingers crossed and trying not to lament over this "perfect" running weather.
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Hi Everyone,
    It is mental health week here in Australia and I am fascinated with the attempts by the media, organizations, and health professionals alike to increase awareness in relation to the true challenges to support individuals and families with mental health challenges. Although I appreciate the gestures and the attention, what I think is missing from most of the "surfacy" kind of rhetoric and motherhood statements is the recognition that individuals who are managing their own internal strife are not necessarily SICK. I do not hold the view that we are ill. There isn't a Depression germ or an Anxiety virus. Our brains have been changed over time due to chemical abnormalities, social impacts, traumas, coping strategies that stopped working long ago, circumstantial pressure and overwhelming life challenges. So....we are left with the pieces of the puzzle to reassemble and quite often there is little recognition or actual support around at the level and degree required. There are caring people, knowledgable professional and services but it has been my experience that I am accountable to myself for getting better and I would like that to be recognized and supported in meaningful ways. This thread is one of my strategies which I have found extremely healing and enlightening. I do not chose to rely on medication and really want to change the way my brain responds to aspects of my life including how I eat, exercise and function. Please understand that I am not anti-medication and I totally support those of us who find value and relief from medical interventions. I just know that the medical interventions do not teach skills or strategies given the assumptions of the "illness" model. I want to believe that I can learn how to manage my life differently and more specifically my thought processes and my responses to life. I would really like to know what you think about this area?
  • kiela64kiela64 Member Posts: 1,448 Member Member Posts: 1,448 Member
    Hi Everyone,
    It is mental health week here in Australia and I am fascinated with the attempts by the media, organizations, and health professionals alike to increase awareness in relation to the true challenges to support individuals and families with mental health challenges. Although I appreciate the gestures and the attention, what I think is missing from most of the "surfacy" kind of rhetoric and motherhood statements is the recognition that individuals who are managing their own internal strife are not necessarily SICK. I do not hold the view that we are ill. There isn't a Depression germ or an Anxiety virus. Our brains have been changed over time due to chemical abnormalities, social impacts, traumas, coping strategies that stopped working long ago, circumstantial pressure and overwhelming life challenges. So....we are left with the pieces of the puzzle to reassemble and quite often there is little recognition or actual support around at the level and degree required. There are caring people, knowledgable professional and services but it has been my experience that I am accountable to myself for getting better and I would like that to be recognized and supported in meaningful ways. This thread is one of my strategies which I have found extremely healing and enlightening. I do not chose to rely on medication and really want to change the way my brain responds to aspects of my life including how I eat, exercise and function. Please understand that I am not anti-medication and I totally support those of us who find value and relief from medical interventions. I just know that the medical interventions do not teach skills or strategies given the assumptions of the "illness" model. I want to believe that I can learn how to manage my life differently and more specifically my thought processes and my responses to life. I would really like to know what you think about this area?

    I think your perspective is really interesting. I've never really thought of it like that, but I don't think I believe in the "illness model" as well, because you're right, it's not a virus or bacteria. It's also not genetic like some other mental issues are (autism, dyslexia, etc).

    I personally am very much against medication for anxiety, and think of it as only a last-resort short-term solution for depression. I know that's not everyone's journey, but from the reading I've done on the medications for these "illnesses" is that for the most part the side effects (harm) outweigh the benefit, and the benefit dwindles over time. At the very least, I'm against it for myself. And I think conceiving of it as an "illness" leads to the simplistic belief that you can just pop a pill and be done with it. Which, even if you are on medication, is never the whole story (therapy or self-help).

    I would say it makes more sense to me as more of an "injury" model. I've been in physio for issues related to tense IT bands in my legs, which have caused a whole host of other knee-related issues (like my knee dislocating for a while, that was not fun). I see a lot of similarities. You go to a professional who may or may not be also trained as a doctor, you get things to practice on, and then you get checked out next time. It's also likely something you'll have to deal with, maybe on and off, for the rest of your life. Like my IT bands, I'll have stretches to do when I feel them tensing, but I may have soreness and repeated injuries forever anyway. :( What's changed is now I know how to do both preventative and remedial exercises. And I think anxiety and depression work similarly. We learn strategies on how to deal with it over time, and do preventative things like talk therapy or CBT, but sometimes we still get caught up in it.

    I just thought of this now, so it might not make sense to anyone else, but it just kinda makes sense to me? Thanks for the thinking point!
  • allenpriestallenpriest Member Posts: 1,102 Member Member Posts: 1,102 Member
    daniet23 wrote: »
    I have also battled with my weight and bi polar disorder pretty much my whole life. I have found that in order for me to be physically healthy I first have to tend to my health mentally. That means taking my meds talking to and being honest with my therapist and phycologists. Sometimes therapy really helps me when I'm going thru my lows. I used to be ashamed of my diagnosis, because the way the public portrays people with bipolar as being "crazy", but now that I have accepted that thats apart of who I am I'm finally on the road to recovery and getting healthy. Ik I'm a stranger but if u ever need an ear I'm a great listener I feel for u and can relate.

    We're all a bit "crazy" in our own way. My way of coping with issues from the abuse was an addiction, but since it was eating and food I could get away with it longer than if it were something illegal. But it was just as destructive. First I had to sort through those issues. Part of that was learning it wasn't my fault that I got shamed constantly and beaten occasionally. I learned that being able to say it happened wasn't something I had ti hide - being taught it was "my fault" and "no one can know to protect the family" was part of the abuse.

    Acknowledging that it happened was the first step and really learning it wasn't my fault was the second step.
  • allenpriestallenpriest Member Posts: 1,102 Member Member Posts: 1,102 Member
    I would really like to know what you think about this area?

    Sometimes meds are critically necessary. Sometimes meds can take the edge off so that we can be able to learn and apply other skills so that we don't need meds long term. Each case is different.

  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Dear allenpriest and others,
    Of course meds may be critically necessary and even essential for well-being and to throw the baby out with the bath water is ill-advised and may even be dangerous. I am just concerned that we invest more time and attention on the many factors which contribute to our mental health including the social aspects of our lives because how we inevitably cope and manage our thoughts, feelings, responses and choices will likely determine how we impact our lives and the people in them. How we think about ourselves, our problems, and more importantly our range of choices and solutions may link directly to what we decide to do. I am so impressed with the contributions people are making to our thread. This suggests to me that we are capable of moving our minds to highly constructive, healthy levels of functioning which has to bode well for our well-being and success. Life is difficult. Yet, we accept the difficulties, face the pain, and problem-solve. That is the deal. I wish someone could wave the magic wand and make it easier. At the same time, maybe it is the journey itself and the pain we feel, that we learn what we most need to understand. Sounds very "Zen" but it is what I think
    Have good sleeps everyone

    S

  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    I would really like to know what you think about this area?

    Sometimes meds are critically necessary. Sometimes meds can take the edge off so that we can be able to learn and apply other skills so that we don't need meds long term. Each case is different.

    Amen to this, allenpriest!

    I would love to forgo big pharma. I've tried, with bad results. Each case is different, and frankly, each rise and fall of my own depression is also different. Without being able to exercise, the drug that worked so well in July is no longer working. Sigh, back to the proverbial drawing board. Could I try again to just stop taking pharma drugs and see what happens? I could, but I really don't want my children visiting me in a mental hospital. I'm not being dramatic. There are so many levels and severities of this "issue" we call depression........ Not wanting to be alive anymore just feels like an illness to me. It is not normal to want to die. Maybe I use the term "illness" as a crutch. I will never kill myself. Never. As much as I would like to. I tell myself it is the illness that wants to die, not me. That, and not wanting to give my children the legacy of a mother who left them through suicide....... Keep me alive. (On my darkest of days)
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