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Depression and Weight Loss

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  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    How is everyone today? Depression is not just a mood disorder. It is a way of thinking. I'm at the gym (with a sore leg because some maniac senior cyclist ran me off the pathway and I stabbed my groin as I was unceremoniously hurled from my bike).And insteadof merging with the sweaty jocks, I think hopeless sad thoughts about being poor, unloved and stuck in my world. I decided to write to you instead of quitting. Don't think B6 and fish oil will help me today. Maybe a moment to reflect on the nature of my Depression. I give up quickly and avoid stress. (Remnants of an angry Dad and passive Mom?). Ok. I've just exhausted my psychotherapeutic wisdom. Maybe I'm lazy? Perhaps I do not see progress quickly enough? Or, my brain generates useless thoughts and my mind is like a bad neighbourhood ... Don't travel there alone! That's it. Don't trust your brain. But then get it to problem solve. What's the problem?
    1. Remaining focused on healthy choices
    2. Look for any minor miracles or at least positive minutes today
    3. Notice things that work out
    4. Sweat a bit at the gym. After all, I'm here.

    Where are you today. What's your lifeline? You are probably cared about and loved but you may not be looking in the right direction.
    And if we are alone, look in the mirror and think of 3 things you do or can learn to like about yourself.
    1. I'm able to get myself out of bed and get to the gym
    2. I like the Beegees(I met Barry Gibbs a few weeks ago)
    3. I get to ramble on to you.

    Thanks for listening
    S
  • SnakesLadders79SnakesLadders79 Member, Premium Posts: 10 Member Member, Premium Posts: 10 Member
    This is a really interesting post :)
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Thanks Snakes.. Hard to know if I'm boring people with my verbosity. I have never spoken so freely or deeply about my depression and weight struggles. I hope readers feel free to say it the way it is. We have to help one another get better.
    I'm going to have a screen-free day tomorrow so hope everyone stays well and finds something to look forward to.
    Adiose
  • TrickyDiscoTrickyDisco Member Posts: 2,875 Member Member Posts: 2,875 Member
    Can relate to a lot of what's been posted on this thread and really appreciate everyone's honesty, I find it so difficult to talk about these issues with anyone so bottle it all up. I also avoid stress to the point where I've almost totally cut myself off from reality, whatever that is ... but on a good day can count my blessings. Thought I'd stay in today but such a lovely sunny day went for a long walk instead which at least temporarily lifted the fog in my brain, my 'black dog' slept while my real black dog enjoyed her walk. Keep rambling on shelleygold, I may not be able to contribute much but your posts are helping me and others.
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Hi,
    I decided I needed to write this morning. Do you have family members who do not understand Depression, let alone the frustrations of obesity and sticking to the diet program? I guess people may grow weary of the struggles we have and one shouldn't judge them for finding it hard to be constantly supportive. My partner would certainly prefer that I loose my weight quickly and permanently and I find it difficult to reassure her after years of promises and cyclic weight loss. I guess we have to be honest with what we are trying to achieve and then make these achievements for the right reasons. Has to come from our own decisions and commitments to ourselves. Just wanted to share that this morning. Hope you are all well.
    S
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 25,115 Member Member Posts: 25,115 Member
    68myra wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Exercise and Depression


    Besides lifting your mood, regular exercise offers other health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, protecting against heart disease and cancer, and boosting self-esteem. How often or intensely you need to exercise to alleviate depression is not clear, but for general health, experts advise getting half an hour to an hour of moderate exercise, such as brisk walking, on all or most days of the week.

    Read more: http://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/exercise-and-depression-report-excerpt

    i agree 100%. i have "managed" my depression with prescriptions and exercise and eating wisely(when i can muster it)...... can you recommend how to handle injuries? i've done it in the past..... now, i'm not doing so good. i haven't run consistently since early July. i switched to bicycling. now, i've been told (by a physical therapist) to not run, bike, play tennis or garden. mentally, i'm a sinking ship. i'm going to yoga twice a week. walking doesn't generally ease my depression symptoms. even swimming messes with my hips because of my pelvic weaknesses and poor movement patterns. I'll be grateful for any ideas that might help keep me out of this black hole.
    :)

    @68myra your post gave me lots of questions, so I'll number them:
    1. What are the nature of your injuries?
    2. What has your PT said you can do?
    3. Re swimming, since you have poor movement patterns, how about working with a swim coach?
    4. For how long are you walking? Happy hormones kick in for me at different times for different types of exercise. Basically, the easier the exercise, the longer it takes.
    5. Does yoga help mentally? Are you going to a yoga studio or are you taking yoga at a gym? I have taken and taught at both places, and in general find more physical benefits at gym yoga and mental benefits at yoga studio yoga.
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Hi tribe,
    I was thinking this morning that depression can be managed better if I poke holes in some of the rigid beliefs I tend to have. For example, I'm not married to my big stomache and nor am I a slave to the foods ( I use this term loosely) I swallow. I actually have choices. So do you. So, today, the challenge is positive thinking ; even when I step on the scale,check my bank account, look for a shirt that fits, choose a salad for breaky, notice the skinny people, and be reminded by my 84 year old mother in law that I am a large man.
    I can do this. Can I do this?
    Can you?
  • kiela64kiela64 Member Posts: 1,448 Member Member Posts: 1,448 Member
    I was thinking today about how my eating and depression have usually cycled together. I'm really struggling right now with keeping up with school work (I'm so behind it feels impossible, and I want to give up and do nothing), I have a serious knee injury that's hit me out of left field and I'm very afraid. I can't exercise. But I'm not overeating. It's the one thing I'm okay with right now. I can tell I've lost weight, and it gives me something tangible to say "hey, I can actually do stuff. Some stuff, sometimes. I'm not worthless." I'm really pleased with that, despite all of the crying lately. :)
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Well Done!!!!! You are a success! Never forget that.
    kae612 wrote: »
    I was thinking today about how my eating and depression have usually cycled together. I'm really struggling right now with keeping up with school work (I'm so behind it feels impossible, and I want to give up and do nothing), I have a serious knee injury that's hit me out of left field and I'm very afraid. I can't exercise. But I'm not overeating. It's the one thing I'm okay with right now. I can tell I've lost weight, and it gives me something tangible to say "hey, I can actually do stuff. Some stuff, sometimes. I'm not worthless." I'm really pleased with that, despite all of the crying lately. :)

  • Timshel_Timshel_ Member Posts: 22,863 Member Member Posts: 22,863 Member
    Exercise helps hugely for me, as does avoiding alcohol.

    Lots of exercise and cutting down on sugar and caffeine helps me.
    More so, aligning my mind and spirit with my body is essential to help me feel balanced.

    Been keeping me off pills since it all hit years ago.

  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    @68myra your post gave me lots of questions, so I'll number them:
    1. What are the nature of your injuries?
    2. What has your PT said you can do?
    3. Re swimming, since you have poor movement patterns, how about working with a swim coach?
    4. For how long are you walking? Happy hormones kick in for me at different times for different types of exercise. Basically, the easier the exercise, the longer it takes.
    5. Does yoga help mentally? Are you going to a yoga studio or are you taking yoga at a gym? I have taken and taught at both places, and in general find more physical benefits at gym yoga and mental benefits at yoga studio yoga.

    wow. firstly, let me just say THANK YOU to you for taking an interest and asking me these questions! I apologize for the late response.
    also, since my first post on this thread, I have seen an orthopedist/sports medicine Dr: X-rays were fine, nerve damage unlikely, and he believes i have a muscle imbalance and a particularly weak right glute.
    To answer your questions:

    1. Right hip pain to the extent that it wakes me up and i cannot go back to sleep (inactivity is the worst thing for it)
    2. my PT says i can walk, and i have a slew of stretches/exercises assigned. I originally sought her out for chronic tailbone pain, which i am now able to manage (most of the time) on my own.
    3. my husband was a competitive swimmer decades ago, and gave me advice 5 years ago, when i tried a mini sprint triathlon. i have not tried a professional coach, but i will surely consider it. my "cheats" as my PT calls them are hardly perceptible to the eye. at times, even SHE has to "unlock" things, before she can find the real culprit of my problem (i frequently get lumbar facet joint locks, have the left side of my tailbone not moving when it should, or an "up-slip" of my right leg)
    4. based on the past, it probably takes about 9 miles of walking before i see any mental health benefit. I am most certainly not walking that much right now. i agree: the easier the exercise, the longer it takes.
    5. YES, yoga helps mentally. the last 15 min of the classes i attend are relaxation/meditation/mindfulness training. However, the DR. i saw last week said Yoga is the best thing for my hip issue.... just not the "gentle" yoga i've been doing. He actually recommended the YOGA X dvd from P90X. I happen to have a copy of that 90 min routine, and let's just say i'll be doing it..... with modifications. hopefully less modifications over time :)

    thanks again for your interest in my plight! knowing that there is something i can work on has helped my mental state enough to stop eating sugar and processed food.... double win there. things are looking up. it will just take time.

    I'll never run every day again, but i learned that a looong time ago. Dr. funny guy last week said to me: welcome to the age of triathlons, hehe. i'm 46, he's 48. gotta mix it up from now on.
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    Hi,
    I decided I needed to write this morning. Do you have family members who do not understand Depression, let alone the frustrations of obesity and sticking to the diet program? I guess people may grow weary of the struggles we have and one shouldn't judge them for finding it hard to be constantly supportive. My partner would certainly prefer that I loose my weight quickly and permanently and I find it difficult to reassure her after years of promises and cyclic weight loss. I guess we have to be honest with what we are trying to achieve and then make these achievements for the right reasons. Has to come from our own decisions and commitments to ourselves. Just wanted to share that this morning. Hope you are all well.
    S

    all i think i can say to this is: OMG, YES! my depression isn't obvious in my weight, but it sure is elsewhere! i think i need to put a yellow star on this thread! :)
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    It is so hard to know how mood changes and food work together. So many patterns and automatic responses become established over time and although the mind knows "better", the habits run the show even before the internal debate has a chance to occur. It is kind of like the decision is made in some sort of dissociative manner as if it is someone else who is reaching for the sugary food or salty chips. I know that may seem like an excuse and perhaps it is, but awareness is not always available when I want it. The "why bother nothing will ever change" part of me, created my the depressed state of mind quite comfortable opens the door to irresponsible and irreversible consequences. I do not choose to be Bulimic although I have wondered if getting rid of the food once I have eaten it would be a short-cut way to not have to make any changes. I think this may be typical of how I try and avoid the more obvious requirements of dealing with the discomfort of responsible food selection.
    I would like to know how you find the power to be disciplined? What strategies do you use?
    Did you hear about the little kids in the Psych experiment in which they are left in a room with one marshmallow on a plate and the researcher says that if the child waits for the researcher to return, the child can have two marshmallows. If the child eats the one marshmallow any sooner that is all he/she gets. You can easily see how some kids distract themselves quite cleverly to keep their minds busy until they have passed enough time until the researcher returns. Then there are the kids from my tribe. Poor marshmallow doesn't stand a chance. Is it never too late to learn? I am going to practice the experiment during my day today. One pink glazed, fluffy, yummy marshmallow on a plate beside my computer. Let's see how long it lasts. What are the Vegas odds?
    I will let you know tomorrow
    Keep the faith folks and write to me and let me know which type of kid are you? Be honest


    um, there are so many questions in there.... but i'll give you some observations about myself. a bit of background: i have had treatment resistant depression all of my life. i have not tried ECT, magnetic therapy or vagal nerve stimulation, nor have i tried any of the MAOI's. (it's easier to say what i've have NOT yet tried)

    I am currently taking fetzima and aderall (both for depression). i've been on/off meds all my adult life. i also know that all meds just stop working. it's not "if" , it is "when"

    vigorous exercise is, by far, for ME, the best antidepressant.

    eating nothing but whole foods (meaning minimally processed) is a close second best.

    sleeping 8 hours a night helps a lot. BOTH sleeping too little AND sleeping too much, increase my depression.

    being outdoors and getting sunshine helps me. i enjoy "nature". i don't care about a tan, but sun exposure makes vitamin D. (I take a vitamin D3 supplement in winter)

    i feel better when i limit alcohol. i have an 'addictive' personality, if that makes sense. i even have to be careful with MFP!! if i catch myself obsessing, i make myself back off. speaking of eating disorders...... oh, it is so very tempting. i've been in a lot of physical pain lately.... but i'm even afraid of OTC painkillers. addictions suck. and it's so very easy to just exchange one addiction for another.

    THAT brings me to my original point!!!! (you may have met your rambling match, hehe)

    I log on a thread here in MFP called "just for today". we set daily goals and provide accountability. it's a wonderful thing. so..... i recently broke out of a short-lived bad eating trend by stating the following goals:

    1. under 20g of sugar for the day (this is for ME, personally. sugar is my enemy, at least temporarily)
    2. no vegetable oil

    number 2 is kinda weird, i know, but it works for me, and i recently figured out why:

    my brain doesn't like processed food. it just doesn't. but it's yummy and crunchy and salty and/or sweet, and i get a rush of endorphins that make me temporarily happy and it TASTES SO GOOD. but then i just want MORE. and more .... yadda yadda
    but IF i write: NO PROCESSED FOOD for a goal...... my inner child (addict) takes offense. "that's not fair" "everyone else gets to eat what they want" "one bite won't hurt" "i deserve it after "fill in the blank" "everyone is allowed to have a bad day"

    for whatever reason, if my goal is: no vegetable oil ..... it's easier to resist eating the "banned" item. it's just for a day, right? i can resist eating "vegetable oil" for 24 hours!!!!!

    by the time i've gone 24 hours without "vegetable oil" (and for me, under 20g of sugar) ..... i remember why i chose that goal. make it two whole days? i'm a new person.

    if you've managed to read all this stuff..... i surely hope you are rewarded with some kind of enlightenment you can apply to your own struggles.
    Myra.
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member

    Is rowing an option? My go to's when injured are stationary cycling, rowing, swimming, and weight lifting for whatever body parts can handle it.

    Btw, whether diagnosed or undiagnosed, I suspect depression frequently factors into weight gain. There may be a limited number of people who respond to threads like this, but many more who may read it and benefit.

    Thank you for the suggestion! i don't have a gym membership, nor a rowing "machine", but i can surely work on upper body strength while i'm working out my hip issues!
  • shelleygoldshelleygold Member Posts: 178 Member Member Posts: 178 Member
    Great advice and reflections from people who are facing the true and enormous challenges of depression, anxiety and body care. What I find most inspiring is the degree of honesty that accompanies the decision to be vulnerable and real. The willingness to share the bits of us that we are not proud of or even safe with creates the possibility that we can connect at deeper and more meaningful levels. We are all perfectly imperfect and learn as we go. After all, some people get older and wiser and some people just get older. We are not defined by our past, by our depression or by our weight. We get to choose how we see ourselves and how we decide to like and accept the qualities in us that make us unique. Let's celebrate something about ourselves today that we truly appreciate. Life is short.
    Have a beautiful day tribe.
    S
  • TrickyDiscoTrickyDisco Member Posts: 2,875 Member Member Posts: 2,875 Member
    Love that - 'we are all perfectly imperfect' - need to remind myself of that more often. And so true we are not defined by our past etc. but hard sometimes to break free of self-destructive thoughts and think positively for a change. I will try harder, also try to curb the over-eating - although making healthy choices most of the time a sweet tooth often ruins my intentions to stay within my calorie limit, thinking about food all the time, listening to Kyary Pamyu Pamyu's Candy Candy right now doesn't help! :)
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Member Posts: 11,234 Member Member Posts: 11,234 Member
    depression is sometimes just a mood disorder and has nothing to do with my thinking. It's more than just a sad feeling or thinking.
    i know i can be perfectly happy but still have my cloud behind me. and it doesn't matter what i do. exercise does help but sometimes that doesn't work either. because it's brain chemicals and my chemical ratio is off and deficient. so i get medical help.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 25,115 Member Member Posts: 25,115 Member
    68myra wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    @68myra your post gave me lots of questions, so I'll number them:
    1. What are the nature of your injuries?
    2. What has your PT said you can do?
    3. Re swimming, since you have poor movement patterns, how about working with a swim coach?
    4. For how long are you walking? Happy hormones kick in for me at different times for different types of exercise. Basically, the easier the exercise, the longer it takes.
    5. Does yoga help mentally? Are you going to a yoga studio or are you taking yoga at a gym? I have taken and taught at both places, and in general find more physical benefits at gym yoga and mental benefits at yoga studio yoga.

    wow. firstly, let me just say THANK YOU to you for taking an interest and asking me these questions! I apologize for the late response.
    also, since my first post on this thread, I have seen an orthopedist/sports medicine Dr: X-rays were fine, nerve damage unlikely, and he believes i have a muscle imbalance and a particularly weak right glute.
    To answer your questions:

    1. Right hip pain to the extent that it wakes me up and i cannot go back to sleep (inactivity is the worst thing for it)
    2. my PT says i can walk, and i have a slew of stretches/exercises assigned. I originally sought her out for chronic tailbone pain, which i am now able to manage (most of the time) on my own.
    3. my husband was a competitive swimmer decades ago, and gave me advice 5 years ago, when i tried a mini sprint triathlon. i have not tried a professional coach, but i will surely consider it. my "cheats" as my PT calls them are hardly perceptible to the eye. at times, even SHE has to "unlock" things, before she can find the real culprit of my problem (i frequently get lumbar facet joint locks, have the left side of my tailbone not moving when it should, or an "up-slip" of my right leg)
    4. based on the past, it probably takes about 9 miles of walking before i see any mental health benefit. I am most certainly not walking that much right now. i agree: the easier the exercise, the longer it takes.
    5. YES, yoga helps mentally. the last 15 min of the classes i attend are relaxation/meditation/mindfulness training. However, the DR. i saw last week said Yoga is the best thing for my hip issue.... just not the "gentle" yoga i've been doing. He actually recommended the YOGA X dvd from P90X. I happen to have a copy of that 90 min routine, and let's just say i'll be doing it..... with modifications. hopefully less modifications over time :)

    thanks again for your interest in my plight! knowing that there is something i can work on has helped my mental state enough to stop eating sugar and processed food.... double win there. things are looking up. it will just take time.

    I'll never run every day again, but i learned that a looong time ago. Dr. funny guy last week said to me: welcome to the age of triathlons, hehe. i'm 46, he's 48. gotta mix it up from now on.

    As a certified yoga teacher, I'm going to respectfully disagree with your doctor about Yoga X. Since your physical therapist told you not to not run, bike, play tennis or garden, Yoga X is likely also too challenging for you, unless you are a very experienced yogini, and very in touch with your body and the modifications you will need to make.

    Maybe work with your PT to take specific hip exercises from Yoga X and weave them into your gentle yoga routine? Oh, you're taking classes...ask your yoga teacher about hip strengthening exercises? Would be great if your yoga teacher and PT could talk to each other!

    What's the diagnosis for the source of your hip pain?
  • LisaTcanLisaTcan Member Posts: 410 Member Member Posts: 410 Member
    I've struggled with depression in the past, also an eating disorder, what I have found really helps:

    - good meds/doctor/therapist
    - daily exercise and walking outside
    - sleeping 8 hours a night
    - eating healthy meals, avoiding snacking and grazing
    - good friends :)
    - CBT is great if you can make your self do it

    Hugs, hang in there :)
  • 68myra68myra Member Posts: 977 Member Member Posts: 977 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »

    As a certified yoga teacher, I'm going to respectfully disagree with your doctor about Yoga X. Since your physical therapist told you not to not run, bike, play tennis or garden, Yoga X is likely also too challenging for you, unless you are a very experienced yogini, and very in touch with your body and the modifications you will need to make.

    Maybe work with your PT to take specific hip exercises from Yoga X and weave them into your gentle yoga routine? Oh, you're taking classes...ask your yoga teacher about hip strengthening exercises? Would be great if your yoga teacher and PT could talk to each other!

    What's the diagnosis for the source of your hip pain?

    THANK YOU for your respectful disagreement. The first thing i said to the dr. was: i've tried P90X before (6 years ago), and my physical therapist said: never again! He agreed, with the exception of the yoga part. I agree with you that I am not nearly strong enough for most of it, and I've already sought out the advice of my yoga teacher (I typically go to two classes per week, but i have a 4th grader tracked out right now) I am already working on strengthening my weak butt. I am not an experienced yogini, but i'm learning leaps and bounds about being in touch with my body. it's quite possible I'm TOO flexible, as my yoga teacher recently suggested I go to end range for poses.... then back up a bit and engage muscles around the knees and hips/glutes. (she also says i'm squatting too far to keep the glutes engaged) oh, and anytime we are standing, to keep my weight in my heels.

    Dr. funny guy told me my diagnosis is muscle imbalance. He said I could try running again when I am capable of doing a single leg squat, with hip stability, both sides. He also advised me to keep doing foam rolling, and triggerpoint therapy ball work (self myo-fascial release, basically)

    I'm going to beat this. just not as fast as i want to. I'm very encouraged by the fact that i will be able to run again. at least in limited amounts.

    not eating processed food, and limiting sugar has helped clear my head a bit, so i'm thankful for that :)

    ALSO grateful for the kind people, like you, on this thread.
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