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40 year old women and older who has lost 40 or more lbs - HOW THE HECK DID YOU DO IT???

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  • PowerliftingMom
    PowerliftingMom Posts: 430 Member
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    Lifting weights and eating clean
  • STLBADGIRL
    STLBADGIRL Posts: 1,693 Member
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    jrm0501 wrote: »
    Hi there -- I am 42 years old and halfway to my goal, but things seem to be slowing down. I found this thread while looking for some encouragement, and I read through the whole thing. You all are amazing! I'm 5'5 and started this journey at 185. My current weight is 165, and I'd like to get down to 140-145. I started walking and logging my calories in June, and my progress has been slow but steady. I've been happy with it. My mental shift came as I was thinking about my kids and my quality of life. I was overweight (and still am), but I don't have any significant health problems. I'm hypothyroid, but have been medicated for 14 years, so that's a non-issue. I did have gestational diabetes, which is comparable to Type 2 diabetes, during two of my three pregnancies, so it has always been in the back of my mind that if I didn't get my weight under control, I would be setting myself up to have T2D.

    My weight traveled up with each of my pregnancies, never quite getting down to where I was previously when I got pregnant the next time. My children are 9, almost 7, and almost 5. It occurred to me, one day within the last year, that I will be well into my 70s by the time my children are the age I am now. What kind of 70-something do I want to be? Do I want to be a burden to them with a host of health problems that could have been prevented if I had taken control of the situation or do I want to be an active, healthy "young" 70-something? After that, I began noticing how elderly overweight people move in this world, and it looked so hard. I knew that's where I might be heading, so I made a decision one day that it was enough. It was time and I would start now. It was a day in June, don't even remember which one, and I pulled out my tennis shoes and started walking. A couple weeks later, I decided to start paying attention to my diet, too. My husband has lost 50-60 pounds on MFP and kept it off over the last two years. He still logs in every day, even if he doesn't record every single bite since he's in maintenance.

    What I found was that our meals are not the problem. It's my snacking. Every time one of my kids needed a snack, I seemed to think I needed one, too. As a stay at home mom, the food is always right there and those calories add up. It's not terribly unhealthy food, but quantity matters. That's all it really took for me to start seeing results. I eat what I want within reason and just stay within my calorie goal. Simple, but not easy.

    I'm proud of what I've accomplished so far, and hope to continue to see results. The biggest thing for me this time around, is that my motivation is not centered around how I want to look (although, that is a delightful side effect) but more about not taking my health for granted. I don't want to look back in 20 years, taking medications and having a hard time getting around, and wishing I had done something then. Do it now, because it won't be easier later. :-)

    @jrm0501 - I'm happy this thread has helped you! It did the same for me. We have some awesome, productive people on here. But your concern, was my concern. Yes, I want to look good and feel good in my skin, but more importantly I want to be healthy, I want to assist in preserving my life. and I want to be able to move around and not be a burden to my family when I creep up there in age. I witnessed my grandmother moving slow, and aching to walk and do certain things and I most def. didn't want to go through that if I could help it.

    But what I have learned is - that I love going to the gym. I love lifting weights, and I really get gitty inside when I go up in weight! So seeing my strength inside and outside the gym have become very sexy to me. For instance, I get excited when I can push the plate away on my own....hahahahaaaa, I was raised to eat everything on my plate so this is a big accomplishment and mind shift.

    Good luck with your goals you are on the right track.
  • NanP135
    NanP135 Posts: 219 Member
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    STLBADGIRL wrote: »
    NAP150 wrote: »
    It can and has been done by many women over 40. I think something just has to make you Want to change. Mine was a picture that was taken and I realized I was kidding my self for years that I wasn't that fat. Then a doctors visit and problem with my Blood Pressure and then on a medication, not where I wanted to be. So I started with MFP again in August 2016, went to plant fitness until March 2017 and then found Cross Fit and a wonderful group of people who are so encouraging and I love it. So at 51 years old I am down 55 pounds and feel like I am 20 years younger.

    I think the main thing is you need to find something active you enjoy, find your place....I was lucky enough to find where I belong

    Crossfit at 51 is the bomb! Thanks for sharing your story!!!!

    Thanks.....The younger ones keep me going. A good cross-fit box will scale workouts for newer or limited ability members and I did at first now I am able to do most workouts and keep up. Wish I had found it a few years ago.
  • STLBADGIRL
    STLBADGIRL Posts: 1,693 Member
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    NAP150 wrote: »
    STLBADGIRL wrote: »
    NAP150 wrote: »
    It can and has been done by many women over 40. I think something just has to make you Want to change. Mine was a picture that was taken and I realized I was kidding my self for years that I wasn't that fat. Then a doctors visit and problem with my Blood Pressure and then on a medication, not where I wanted to be. So I started with MFP again in August 2016, went to plant fitness until March 2017 and then found Cross Fit and a wonderful group of people who are so encouraging and I love it. So at 51 years old I am down 55 pounds and feel like I am 20 years younger.

    I think the main thing is you need to find something active you enjoy, find your place....I was lucky enough to find where I belong

    Crossfit at 51 is the bomb! Thanks for sharing your story!!!!

    Thanks.....The younger ones keep me going. A good cross-fit box will scale workouts for newer or limited ability members and I did at first now I am able to do most workouts and keep up. Wish I had found it a few years ago.

    I've been tempted many times to do cross fit....but these knees talk me out of it all the time.
  • STLBADGIRL
    STLBADGIRL Posts: 1,693 Member
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    brookielaw wrote: »
    Hard work. Dedication. Drive. Commitment to myself and my family. The magic formula is CI<CO.

    Figure out your "why" and let your "why" help motivate you when things are tough. I'm 43 and had my daughter at 41. I weighed 329 the day I delivered but my highest was 387 (although in my 30's to be fair). My daughter is 2 now and I fluctuate in the 148-152 range. I love my entire family, but Little Bit is my "why," because I know I am leading her by example. She wants to be just like her Mama, so I have to be the best version of myself I can be.
    Find something you love and stick to it. I love to swim. I love triathlons. I love boxing, and lifting, and kayaking, and hiking, and doing 5Ks* with the family.

    Your age (40's? We're YOUNG!) is not a barrier to health. It's not too late to create new healthy habits. I'm honestly the healthiest I've ever been, including as a teenager! Set some realistic goals and reward yourself for achieving them.

    If you have health issues, don't let them be a barrier either. I have severe osteoarthritis. I just don't let it stop me. I can't. *(Due to the OA, I walk the 5Ks, although my pace is becoming closer and closer to a jog, which is cool).

    40 is the new awesome.


    Very good testimony here. I almost spit my water out when you say you are between 148-152! Wow. Good work.
  • STLBADGIRL
    STLBADGIRL Posts: 1,693 Member
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    No magic pill here or secret formula.
    I'm 40 and have lost 34 lbs. I just decided I was sick and tired of being fat etc. I find it motivating to follow people on IG who have lost a lot of weight. I also stick to the same food a lot for simplicity.

    Thank you! I follow people on IG too for motivation!
  • STLBADGIRL
    STLBADGIRL Posts: 1,693 Member
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    lyhyl wrote: »
    I'm 47 and am only 2/3 of the way to my goal, but I have lost 40 pounds since mid-April so I wanted to share what change I made that has worked wonders for me. I've accepted the fact that it is WAY easier for me to ABSTAIN from something, rather than MODERATE it.

    Not saying that abstaining is the way to go, just recognizing that it's what works for me. (I totally recommend googling "Gretchen Rubin" plus "abstainer/moderator"....she explains it so much better than I can.)

    I can't eat "just one" of certain foods....cookies, candy, cake, chips, pieces of cheese, slices of bread, etc. "Just one" quickly snowballs into a binge. Even entertaining the possibility eats up tremendous amounts of willpower and mental energy.

    But it's relatively easy for me to abstain from eating them. If I don't start, I don't continue.

    To enforce this I've made up "rules" that I live by.

    1) Nothing made with flour or any candy is allowed in my home.
    2) No eating in the car. (This prevents me from circumventing rule 1, lol.)

    This doesn't mean that I NEVER have flour. If I go out to eat or am at someone's home, I'll occasionally indulge, but it's only one serving. (I don't bring leftovers of anything flour-y home.)

    I've applied my abstaining mindset to other things too. (And to be clear, I don't think abstaining is "better" than moderating...it's just what works best for me. Many people would chafe at the idea of abstaining....they're natural moderators.)

    I abstain from watching television because once I start watching one show, I want to watch three hours. (An added benefit is I'm not exposed to food commercials.)

    I abstain from allowing "junk" into my home. If it doesn't follow my rule that if I don't use it, love it, feel inspired by it, or if it doesn't have a connection to a great memory, I don't buy it (or keep it...if for example it's a gift). I internalized this decluttering method for my home, before I figured out I could use the same basic principle for my body and it's made my life much easier and lighter.

    I hope that you find this helpful and wish you the best of luck on your journey!

    132938793.png

    Well this is what worked for you....and that's who it needs to work for. I have trigger foods that I try to avoid as well. Others, I can moderate...but I'm learning that portion control is a big part of my problems.
  • STLBADGIRL
    STLBADGIRL Posts: 1,693 Member
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    So I have a big problem with drinking water... So this week's challenge is to drink 8 glasses of water and to do at least 30 mins a cardio a day.
  • STLBADGIRL
    STLBADGIRL Posts: 1,693 Member
    edited November 2017
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    counted every calorie and worked out.

    down 100. 50 to go.

    its not HARD. it does take dedication and patience.

    @callsitlikeiseeit Whoa! Great work!!! You are right, it's not hard, but switching from our habits (bad)is what's difficult! But difficult is not IMPOSSIBLE!
  • STLBADGIRL
    STLBADGIRL Posts: 1,693 Member
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    Been falling short of my 8 glasses of water each day. I've been only hitting 6 glasses. Yesterday I had to used the bathroom 4 times while I worked out. Soooooooooooo irritating!
  • lyhyl
    lyhyl Posts: 66 Member
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    STLBADGIRL wrote: »
    Been falling short of my 8 glasses of water each day. I've been only hitting 6 glasses. Yesterday I had to used the bathroom 4 times while I worked out. Soooooooooooo irritating!

    It IS irritating in the beginning, but stick with it. Your body will eventually acclimate and thank you for it!

    132938793.png
  • STLBADGIRL
    STLBADGIRL Posts: 1,693 Member
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    lyhyl wrote: »
    STLBADGIRL wrote: »
    Been falling short of my 8 glasses of water each day. I've been only hitting 6 glasses. Yesterday I had to used the bathroom 4 times while I worked out. Soooooooooooo irritating!

    It IS irritating in the beginning, but stick with it. Your body will eventually acclimate and thank you for it!

    132938793.png

    Well this is good to hear/read! I have to stop early enough in the day just so I won't go through the night and can get some sleep.

    One glass down. 7 more to go!
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 33,041 Member
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    STLBADGIRL wrote: »
    lyhyl wrote: »
    STLBADGIRL wrote: »
    Been falling short of my 8 glasses of water each day. I've been only hitting 6 glasses. Yesterday I had to used the bathroom 4 times while I worked out. Soooooooooooo irritating!

    It IS irritating in the beginning, but stick with it. Your body will eventually acclimate and thank you for it!

    132938793.png

    Well this is good to hear/read! I have to stop early enough in the day just so I won't go through the night and can get some sleep.

    One glass down. 7 more to go!

    FWIW, and I leave it to each reader to decide whether to act on this or not:

    I went to a lecture given to my breast cancer support group on the subject of treating urinary incontinence or urgency in women, by a medical professional with specialized knowledge in this area. Among other things, she suggested that as long as one was near a bathroom in case of emergency, it was better to wait as long as tolerable, rather than using the bathroom at the first twinge or inclination. Training, I guess.

    Having always had excellent . . . capacity? . . . I didn't personally try this in any systematic way.

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