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Meat Eater, Vegetarian or Vegan?

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  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    I keep protein to about 20% for blood glucose reasons.

    I know eating almost like a carnivore seems odd but I think that is because it is uncommon, and because of the anti cholesterol and saturated fats messages (based on what i think was a lack of science to back it up) that became so widely accepted in the past 50 odd years. I think eventually that being a carnivore will be though to be about as unusual as a vegetarian or vegan.
    If you don't mind me asking, I'm curious as to roughly what percentage of body weight does that protein intake work out to be for you.

    I keep my protein around 65-75g or so per day with a caloric intake set at about 1500kcal. My weight is 150lb. I find my BG starts being affected once my protein gets above 25%, or over 80-85g.

    If my BG starts creeping up, I lower protein a bit, and carbs a lot. I am not doing any consistent exercise, and since a ketogenic diet is muscle sparing, I am sure I am getting enough protein for my needs.

    Odd, the one time bro science was (incorrectly) carbs can spare protein but I've never seen even bro science, let alone actual research that a ketogenic diet spares muscle, particularly without exercise.
    Generally it is training, calories, and protein that spare muscle.
  • Jessie_121980Jessie_121980 Posts: 1,058Member Member Posts: 1,058Member Member
    Meat eater, vegetarian or vegan? I'll give you a hint:

    u449moiyn10o.gif

    The reason? Because meat is delicious and I refuse to give up anything delicious. :wink:

    This. While I enjoy meatless meals...I am a meat eater because I enjoy it :wink:
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,424Member Member Posts: 24,424Member Member
    Dietary composition is healthier (forget the labels).

    A healthy lifestyle includes regular physical exercise, not smoking, a happy relaxed mind, and a nutrient-rich balanced-calorie diet to maintain a moderately lean body weight.

    Weight, hence dietary energy intake appears to be the major dietary factor determining the onset of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, dementia, etc...

    A diet rich in fruits and vegetables, omega 3, with a micronutrient balance is more important than choosing an eating style with respect to the three choices given in the title. Vegetarianism can be a reasonable shortcut to achieving some of this but it does not guarantee it. It is quite achievable with a meat eating diet such as the "Mediterranean-style" diet...
    edited February 2016
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    I keep protein to about 20% for blood glucose reasons.

    I know eating almost like a carnivore seems odd but I think that is because it is uncommon, and because of the anti cholesterol and saturated fats messages (based on what i think was a lack of science to back it up) that became so widely accepted in the past 50 odd years. I think eventually that being a carnivore will be though to be about as unusual as a vegetarian or vegan.
    If you don't mind me asking, I'm curious as to roughly what percentage of body weight does that protein intake work out to be for you.

    I keep my protein around 65-75g or so per day with a caloric intake set at about 1500kcal. My weight is 150lb. I find my BG starts being affected once my protein gets above 25%, or over 80-85g.

    If my BG starts creeping up, I lower protein a bit, and carbs a lot. I am not doing any consistent exercise, and since a ketogenic diet is muscle sparing, I am sure I am getting enough protein for my needs.

    For anyone interested in this, I'd recommend also reading this: "http://anthonycolpo.com/why-low-carb-diets-are-inferior-for-strength-muscle-gains/"; and the cited studies.
  • SandraSchrautSandraSchraut Posts: 5Member Member Posts: 5Member Member
    I grew up on a farm we raised animals for meat, and milk, I do not find meat unhealthy for me but I cannot seem to get enough protein so maybe I don't eat enough? I eat meat maybe once a day, I eat dairy sparingly have some intolerance for it, and veggies are typically somewhat low in protein compared to meat and dairy. Any ideas how to increase protein intake without going over in carbs daily???
  • Scamd83Scamd83 Posts: 808Member Member Posts: 808Member Member
    Anyone who tries to claim eating meat, veganism or vegetarianism is healthier/unhealthier than the other is wrong. And the environmentally friendly claims about one particular way of eating is not 100% accurate either, you can totally find articles that claim non-meat food production can be just as harmful to our planet as meat production. It's just a matter of what you most feel comfortable with, decide for yourself what you would prefer. And don't feel guilty about it and don't listen to anyone who tells you you're wrong (infact ignore those people altogether, anyone who starts telling you to avoid certain food unless for allergy reasons needs to be pushed aside).
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Posts: 4,067Member Member Posts: 4,067Member Member
    Dietary composition is healthier (forget the labels).

    A healthy lifestyle includes regular physical exercise, not smoking, a happy relaxed mind, and a nutrient-rich balanced-calorie diet to maintain a moderately lean body weight.

    Weight, hence dietary energy intake appears to be the major dietary factor determining the onset of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, dementia, etc...

    A diet rich in fruits and vegetables, omega 3, with a micronutrient balance is more important than choosing an eating style with respect to the three choices given in the title. Vegetarianism can be a reasonable shortcut to achieving some of this but it does not guarantee it. It is quite achievable with a meat eating diet such as the "Mediterranean-style" diet...

    This^^^^^^^^^^^ I'm on the Mediterraean diet--a little of everything, moderation. Just yesterday on TV, here in Italy, they were interviewing 90+ people on the island of Sardenia. One old guy was driving a truck up a mountain road. He was 100yrs old. The interviewer asked him what he eats for breakfast. He said milk and bread. This is typical of the older folks in Italy. My mother-in-law and her family were all the same. They take a big glass, put in some milk, break off chunks of bread (usually made with hard durum grain) and eat that. My MIL is now 95.
  • Sued0nimSued0nim Posts: 17,504Member Member Posts: 17,504Member Member
    Omnivore

    I watch my macro intake to ensure sufficient protein intake which I get from pulses as well as dairy and meats

    I watch some of my micro intake roughly but generally have a widely varied diet

    meals may be vegetarian or meat based dependent on what I wish to eat. I have no ethical issues with consuming meat or wearing animal products.

    I am also an active omnivore

    My health has improved markedly since I lost excess weight and got, and remain fit, with progressive resistance and some cardio

    So I think that's it - healthy lifestyle - meet your nutritional guidelines, move more and lift up stuff
  • LounmounLounmoun Posts: 8,433Member Member Posts: 8,433Member Member
    iona_ellen wrote: »
    Hi,
    I have friends who eat meat,, vegetarian & vegans. Doing a web search there is lots of sites with different views of which is overall healthier. What's your view? And from the nutrition side why did you choose this way?
    Remember we're fitness 'pals' so stay friendly:D!

    Depends on the person and if they are meeting their nutritional needs. An individual may be healthier choosing to eat less or no meat but I don't think you can say everyone is because you can still have poor nutrition with any of those choices.
    A vegetarian who only eats white bread with processed cheese slices and no vegetables is probably not as healthy as a meat eater who has a balanced meal. A vegan who eats a proper balance of foods is probably doing better than the meat eater who eats a lot of fried food and snack cakes.
    I eat meat. I also eat plenty of meatless meals. I'm doing okay healthwise.
  • richlnrichln Posts: 811Member Member Posts: 811Member Member
    Dietary composition is healthier (forget the labels).

    A healthy lifestyle includes regular physical exercise, not smoking, a happy relaxed mind, and a nutrient-rich balanced-calorie diet to maintain a moderately lean body weight.

    Weight, hence dietary energy intake appears to be the major dietary factor determining the onset of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, dementia, etc...

    A diet rich in fruits and vegetables, omega 3, with a micronutrient balance is more important than choosing an eating style with respect to the three choices given in the title. Vegetarianism can be a reasonable shortcut to achieving some of this but it does not guarantee it. It is quite achievable with a meat eating diet such as the "Mediterranean-style" diet...

    Good post. A wide variety of foods can all be healthy choices in the right context.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    I keep protein to about 20% for blood glucose reasons.

    I know eating almost like a carnivore seems odd but I think that is because it is uncommon, and because of the anti cholesterol and saturated fats messages (based on what i think was a lack of science to back it up) that became so widely accepted in the past 50 odd years. I think eventually that being a carnivore will be though to be about as unusual as a vegetarian or vegan.
    If you don't mind me asking, I'm curious as to roughly what percentage of body weight does that protein intake work out to be for you.

    I keep my protein around 65-75g or so per day with a caloric intake set at about 1500kcal. My weight is 150lb. I find my BG starts being affected once my protein gets above 25%, or over 80-85g.

    If my BG starts creeping up, I lower protein a bit, and carbs a lot. I am not doing any consistent exercise, and since a ketogenic diet is muscle sparing, I am sure I am getting enough protein for my needs.

    For anyone interested in this, I'd recommend also reading this: "http://anthonycolpo.com/why-low-carb-diets-are-inferior-for-strength-muscle-gains/"; and the cited studies.
    I have to wonder though would the results of that study be different if they used diabetics.

  • ald783ald783 Posts: 707Member Member Posts: 707Member Member
    I don't think most people or don't eat meat or animal products based on health. Like others pointed out, you can find ways to eat healthily (or unhealthily) with any diet.

    I eat meat and I think my diet is more healthy and balanced when I do. That's mostly just laziness on my part though, because I struggle to use alternative sources of protein on days I happen to not eat meat, or less meat. I prefer leaner meats like chicken and turkey but I'll eat any kind.
  • VeganMotoGirlVeganMotoGirl Posts: 52Member Member Posts: 52Member Member
    I had been a meat eater for the first 28 years of my life, until 2012. I jumped into a plant based diet and then slowly moved toward veganism over the last 3 years after a health scare where I had to cut out meat and dairy along with other things to prep for my treatment. And realized that I felt great not eating those things (aside from my other health issue) and when the treatment was over I just kept doing it while gathering more information on how to keep the plant based diet balanced and healthy. Leaving the ethics of vegetarian and veganism out of this, and based on my research over the last few years, I do believe that a plant based diet can be the most healthy in this time in history. I acknowledge from a purely nutritional perspective animal products can provide essential nutrients and many people live long lives on their standard diets. However, the animal products available today are much less nutrient dense and filled with artificial chemicals and added hormones whose side effects on humans long terms can be plainly seen in the health issues we have today. In my opinion, a plant based diet can be very balanced and potentially the most healthy option available to us today.
    edited February 2016
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    I keep protein to about 20% for blood glucose reasons.

    I know eating almost like a carnivore seems odd but I think that is because it is uncommon, and because of the anti cholesterol and saturated fats messages (based on what i think was a lack of science to back it up) that became so widely accepted in the past 50 odd years. I think eventually that being a carnivore will be though to be about as unusual as a vegetarian or vegan.
    If you don't mind me asking, I'm curious as to roughly what percentage of body weight does that protein intake work out to be for you.

    I keep my protein around 65-75g or so per day with a caloric intake set at about 1500kcal. My weight is 150lb. I find my BG starts being affected once my protein gets above 25%, or over 80-85g.

    If my BG starts creeping up, I lower protein a bit, and carbs a lot. I am not doing any consistent exercise, and since a ketogenic diet is muscle sparing, I am sure I am getting enough protein for my needs.

    For anyone interested in this, I'd recommend also reading this: "http://anthonycolpo.com/why-low-carb-diets-are-inferior-for-strength-muscle-gains/"; and the cited studies.
    I have to wonder though would the results of that study be different if they used diabetics.
    Which of the 5 studies?
    Why do you imagine diabetics would generate different results?
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 36,927Member Member Posts: 36,927Member Member
    pie_eyes wrote: »
    Uhh... I eat meat and am aware that it's unhealthy and risky. But meat in my mind is the centerpiece of a meal.

    I don't like the way they kill or treat animals but I can't change other people

    It's not "unhealthy" and "risky"
  • kmbrvt99kmbrvt99 Posts: 19Member Member Posts: 19Member Member
    I'm a vegetarian on the cusp of becoming vegan. I'm a huge believer in knowing where my food comes from so I challenge everyone on this feed to watch a few documentaries such as 'Food Inc' and then ask yourself if you are okay with the way the animals are treated. But to each it's own =)
  • kmbrvt99kmbrvt99 Posts: 19Member Member Posts: 19Member Member
  • DanyellMcGinnisDanyellMcGinnis Posts: 280Member Member Posts: 280Member Member
    Vegetarian since 1993. No desire to eat meat again (never really liked it in the first place...). No desire to become vegan either. Happy right where I am. Have both gained and lost weight as a vegetarian (and have seen the same from omnivores; don't actually know any vegans IRL).

    FWIW, dairy, eggs, nuts and seeds, beans, and even whole grains provide all the protein I need.
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Posts: 13,589Member Member Posts: 13,589Member Member
    In most studies I've seen either a Vegetarian or Mediterranean diet is usually associated with best overall health. I eat meat and more than the Med Diet recommends but I do tend to think of it (Mediterranean Diet*) as the best for health, generally speaking.

    *I am speaking of the defined Mediterranean Diet not of the personal diet(s) of anyone living in a Mediterranean region.
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