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Ultra-processed foods study

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  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Heh, I'm the same way, and people could get all kinds of weird ideas depending on the store and time of year.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 20,809Member Member Posts: 20,809Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Posts: 13,589Member Member Posts: 13,589Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 20,809Member Member Posts: 20,809Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    Where I live the Farmer's Markets are packed on the weekend.

    Does everyone shop the way I do? Of course not.

    But do *some* people? Yes. And when I'm looking at an individual's cart, I have no idea if that particular person shops the way I do or not.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    I guess mainly, based on looking at what is in grocery carts, I'm disturbed by the number of people eating small children. Oddly, no one seems to be talking about this trend, and I've never found the section people are getting them from.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    It depends. I live in a probably more health-conscious than average area where there's a mainstream grocery (Jewel), Trader Joe's, WF, and popular meat market all nearby, and where pretty much everyone I know claims to love the green market(s) and where things like CSAs are popular. I also tend to use the self-service line at the Jewel. If I went by what I see people buy there, I'd assume mostly beer, some ultra processed stuff, even though in the winter I tend to mostly use the Jewel as a place to run in and top off my vegetable and fruit supply. Anyone who formed opinions about either me or my neighbors based on what they saw us buy in line would be wrong (although in different ways). Indeed, I see many of these same people at the green market. (I tend not to look in carts if they aren't right in front of me, but based on TJs and WFs I see people buying quite a mix of stuff, including lots of less processed stuff.)
    edited March 2016
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Posts: 13,589Member Member Posts: 13,589Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    Where I live the Farmer's Markets are packed on the weekend.

    Does everyone shop the way I do? Of course not.

    But do *some* people? Yes. And when I'm looking at an individual's cart, I have no idea if that particular person shops the way I do or not.

    We seem to be talking apples and oranges since I stated quite clearly I was not talking about individuals.
  • bonneboobonneboo Posts: 27Member Member Posts: 27Member Member
    Guilty guilty guilty. I've just recently gotten extremely hooked on cheezits. Happy to find out they have a few vitamins and protein. But it go harder and harder to add them in my macro because I started abusing them. Congrats to all the folk who know how to live their lives without living on overprocessed items. I have a lot of work to do. The main thing is to get my az back in the kitchen
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Posts: 13,589Member Member Posts: 13,589Member Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    It depends. I live in a probably more health-conscious than average area where there's a mainstream grocery (Jewel), Trader Joe's, WF, and popular meat market all nearby, and where pretty much everyone I know claims to love the green market(s) and where things like CSAs are popular. I also tend to use the self-service line at the Jewel. If I went by what I see people buy there, I'd assume mostly beer, some ultra processed stuff, even though in the winter I tend to mostly use the Jewel as a place to run in and top off my vegetable and fruit supply. Anyone who formed opinions about either me or my neighbors based on what they saw us buy in line would be wrong (although in different ways). Indeed, I see many of these same people at the green market. (I tend not to look in carts if they aren't right in front of me, but based on TJs and WFs I see people buying quite a mix of stuff, including lots of less processed stuff.)

    So, seeing all these carts at all these stores gives you no indication at all of how people in your area eat? How do you know it's a health-conscious area?
  • stealthqstealthq Posts: 4,307Member Member Posts: 4,307Member Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    It depends. I live in a probably more health-conscious than average area where there's a mainstream grocery (Jewel), Trader Joe's, WF, and popular meat market all nearby, and where pretty much everyone I know claims to love the green market(s) and where things like CSAs are popular. I also tend to use the self-service line at the Jewel. If I went by what I see people buy there, I'd assume mostly beer, some ultra processed stuff, even though in the winter I tend to mostly use the Jewel as a place to run in and top off my vegetable and fruit supply. Anyone who formed opinions about either me or my neighbors based on what they saw us buy in line would be wrong (although in different ways). Indeed, I see many of these same people at the green market. (I tend not to look in carts if they aren't right in front of me, but based on TJs and WFs I see people buying quite a mix of stuff, including lots of less processed stuff.)
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    It depends. I live in a probably more health-conscious than average area where there's a mainstream grocery (Jewel), Trader Joe's, WF, and popular meat market all nearby, and where pretty much everyone I know claims to love the green market(s) and where things like CSAs are popular. I also tend to use the self-service line at the Jewel. If I went by what I see people buy there, I'd assume mostly beer, some ultra processed stuff, even though in the winter I tend to mostly use the Jewel as a place to run in and top off my vegetable and fruit supply. Anyone who formed opinions about either me or my neighbors based on what they saw us buy in line would be wrong (although in different ways). Indeed, I see many of these same people at the green market. (I tend not to look in carts if they aren't right in front of me, but based on TJs and WFs I see people buying quite a mix of stuff, including lots of less processed stuff.)

    So, seeing all these carts at all these stores gives you no indication at all of how people in your area eat? How do you know it's a health-conscious area?

    Same as @lemurcat. And I know it's a health conscious area because we have a high proportion of people making a deliberate attempt to exercise. Not just gym sign-ups, but actually going to one and/or participating in outdoor activities like running, walking, bicycling, sculling, etc. We're also an island of relative skinniness in the state.

    All of the 'heathy' restaurants and groceries end up in my area, and I don't think that's a coincidence.

    Now whether many of those people shop the way I do, I have no idea. I would think many go to several different groceries if only because Whole Paycheck is expensive if you're not happy with the house brand. Plus, their housewares and cleaning items are non-existent or non-functional. And Central Market - holy Moses. For some items, it stands in an expensive league all it's own, but for others it's fine. And still no basic housewares/cleaning supplies.
  • makingmarkmakingmark Posts: 672Member Member Posts: 672Member Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    It does suggest that a strategy of demonising sugar or ultra processed food will be effective for some people. "Reduce the crap" strategies - even if poorly based on actual nutritional knowledge - will result in lower calorie consumption.

    But it is also likely that it is part of the issues that then results in yo-yoing, poor food relationship, etc.

    The last sentence is my concern.

    I do think cutting out easy to access junk food (and non junk food that happens to be super processed) is a good way to cut calories for some, at least in the short term. It's actually what I did back in my early 30s, although I was never a huge consumer of most of the kinds of foods we are talking about. Deciding that I should be a purist about what I ate simply eliminated a lot of the temptation to eat stuff that was just around. It's not because those products were higher cal or tastier than something I could have made (or bought at a nice restaurant that met my then-standards). It's that I simply wasn't going to make them nearly as often as they were on offer, and I ended up mostly just eating at meals (where for me I'm less likely to overeat).

    That said, I was able to adjust and overeat even following this plan, over time, especially when I got less active.

    AND, maybe I'm an idealist, but I always think that understanding the facts and basing choices on accurate information is so much healthier and better. I don't think I eat a bad diet doing it this way -- I think I actually eat a better diet than when I was more informed by "these foods good, these foods bad" type thinking.

    I think there is a lot of truth here. I have relaxed on my good food/bad food thoughts a lot with reading posts here. I still tend to limit a lot of types of processed food though. I found as I ate less processed food I got more sensitive to the sodium in it and have found I don't enjoy the taste as much anymore.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    It depends. I live in a probably more health-conscious than average area where there's a mainstream grocery (Jewel), Trader Joe's, WF, and popular meat market all nearby, and where pretty much everyone I know claims to love the green market(s) and where things like CSAs are popular. I also tend to use the self-service line at the Jewel. If I went by what I see people buy there, I'd assume mostly beer, some ultra processed stuff, even though in the winter I tend to mostly use the Jewel as a place to run in and top off my vegetable and fruit supply. Anyone who formed opinions about either me or my neighbors based on what they saw us buy in line would be wrong (although in different ways). Indeed, I see many of these same people at the green market. (I tend not to look in carts if they aren't right in front of me, but based on TJs and WFs I see people buying quite a mix of stuff, including lots of less processed stuff.)

    So, seeing all these carts at all these stores gives you no indication at all of how people in your area eat? How do you know it's a health-conscious area?

    The fact I talk to my neighbors, the kinds of marketing that local food-related businesses use, the types of businesses in general (lots of exercise and sports related ones, lots of opportunities for local group runs), the fact that obesity is pretty rare and people are big into biking and running and bringing their kids to active play and sports, stuff like that.
    edited March 2016
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 20,809Member Member Posts: 20,809Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    Where I live the Farmer's Markets are packed on the weekend.

    Does everyone shop the way I do? Of course not.

    But do *some* people? Yes. And when I'm looking at an individual's cart, I have no idea if that particular person shops the way I do or not.

    We seem to be talking apples and oranges since I stated quite clearly I was not talking about individuals.

    In order to draw your conclusions, aren't you looking at individual carts?
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Posts: 13,589Member Member Posts: 13,589Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    Where I live the Farmer's Markets are packed on the weekend.

    Does everyone shop the way I do? Of course not.

    But do *some* people? Yes. And when I'm looking at an individual's cart, I have no idea if that particular person shops the way I do or not.

    We seem to be talking apples and oranges since I stated quite clearly I was not talking about individuals.

    In order to draw your conclusions, aren't you looking at individual carts?

    Looking at all the carts. Some individually, some not, depending on how they line up in my eyesight. But either way taking the information as a whole, not individually.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 20,809Member Member Posts: 20,809Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    Where I live the Farmer's Markets are packed on the weekend.

    Does everyone shop the way I do? Of course not.

    But do *some* people? Yes. And when I'm looking at an individual's cart, I have no idea if that particular person shops the way I do or not.

    We seem to be talking apples and oranges since I stated quite clearly I was not talking about individuals.

    In order to draw your conclusions, aren't you looking at individual carts?

    Looking at all the carts. Some individually, some not, depending on how they line up in my eyesight. But either way taking the information as a whole, not individually.

    But for each of those individual carts that are making up the whole, you have no idea what else they are eating and buying . . . that's my point. Combining a bunch of individual carts into one conclusion is still based on individual carts.

    I get that you trust it as a way to draw conclusions. I'm saying that based on what I know of my shopping habits and what I know of the shopping habits of my family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors, I wouldn't draw conclusions based on that.
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Posts: 13,589Member Member Posts: 13,589Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    Where I live the Farmer's Markets are packed on the weekend.

    Does everyone shop the way I do? Of course not.

    But do *some* people? Yes. And when I'm looking at an individual's cart, I have no idea if that particular person shops the way I do or not.

    We seem to be talking apples and oranges since I stated quite clearly I was not talking about individuals.

    In order to draw your conclusions, aren't you looking at individual carts?

    Looking at all the carts. Some individually, some not, depending on how they line up in my eyesight. But either way taking the information as a whole, not individually.

    But for each of those individual carts that are making up the whole, you have no idea what else they are eating and buying . . . that's my point. Combining a bunch of individual carts into one conclusion is still based on individual carts.

    I get that you trust it as a way to draw conclusions. I'm saying that based on what I know of my shopping habits and what I know of the shopping habits of my family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors, I wouldn't draw conclusions based on that.

    Statistics back up my conclusions so I guess I'm just lucky to live in a area that doesn't have a lot of shopping options.

    Though if I did, I'm not sure it would matter as long as I saw a representative selection of carts from the various options. It's pretty safe to assume that most of the food bought will be consumed. So, if the majority of food in the majority of carts is ultra-processed food, I'd still put my money on that area eating a high % of u-p foods.
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Posts: 13,589Member Member Posts: 13,589Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    Where I live the Farmer's Markets are packed on the weekend.

    Does everyone shop the way I do? Of course not.

    But do *some* people? Yes. And when I'm looking at an individual's cart, I have no idea if that particular person shops the way I do or not.

    We seem to be talking apples and oranges since I stated quite clearly I was not talking about individuals.

    In order to draw your conclusions, aren't you looking at individual carts?

    Looking at all the carts. Some individually, some not, depending on how they line up in my eyesight. But either way taking the information as a whole, not individually.

    But for each of those individual carts that are making up the whole, you have no idea what else they are eating and buying . . . that's my point. Combining a bunch of individual carts into one conclusion is still based on individual carts.

    I get that you trust it as a way to draw conclusions. I'm saying that based on what I know of my shopping habits and what I know of the shopping habits of my family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors, I wouldn't draw conclusions based on that.

    Statistics back up my conclusions so I guess I'm just lucky to live in a area that doesn't have a lot of shopping options.

    Though if I did, I'm not sure it would matter as long as I saw a representative selection of carts from the various options. It's pretty safe to assume that most of the food bought will be consumed. So, if the majority of food in the majority of carts is ultra-processed food, I'd still put my money on that area eating a high % of u-p foods.

    I'd also bet that a higher percentage of fresh foods purchased do not get eaten than ultra-processed, because fresh has a much shorter shelf life.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 20,059Member Member Posts: 20,059Member Member
    I disagree that most people "don't eat that much processed food" (I forget who posted that one) but, where I live, in Central Alabama, all you have to do is look at some of the people checking out at Winn-Dixie and look at what they're buying. Aside from running up their grocery bills (and a lot of people here are on "food-stamp-programs" for themselves and their families so there isn't a lot of wiggle-room there) they are not going to get much nutrition out of the stuff they're buying. And, BTW, it doesn't just stop with the people on govt subsidies: I see plenty of people with young kids loading up on the processed stuff and not a lot of fresh vegs or other "ingredients" etc in those carts. I KNOW it seems easier to give the kids a can of Spaghetti-O's than to cook up some pasta and make some of your own sauce, but they probably don't realise that. ANYWAY, it's too bad that we don't still teach "Home Ec" in hs and try and get some sense and knowledge into the heads of the people who will be raising families in a very short time...(and boys should be taking it, as well!!!)

    I don't think the pasta rings in Spaghetti-Os are any more processed than a dried pasta would be.

    Yes, the pasta rings in Spaghetti-Os are more processed. They are cooked and canned.

    When I make pasta and sauce, I don't add HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP or COTTONSEED or SOY OIL.

    http://www.campbellfoodservice.com/details.aspx?code=1299

    8bb51db8ec17e2a9b8c3d7cf13f77134.png

    I hadn't had Spaghetti-Os in decades but tried them last year to humor my OH. I thought they were awful - nothing like my regular pasta and sauce. (Usually I use canned tomatoes and veggies, but sometimes I will use a jar of Newman's sauce.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    There are a few posts around that insist that people know what others eat based on looking at shopping carts, peaking in windows, etc.
    I find this interesting because, in a scientific sense, I don't even know what I eat unless I consult my food logs. Dieticians logging their food even get it wrong by about 25% at first according to at least one study.

    I would add that looking at someone's cart is a really unreliable way to know what they're eating. I shop at a couple of different places. If you look at my grocery cart in the summer (when I get all my vegetables at the farmer's market), you would conclude that my diet is horrifyingly low in vegetables and fruit. If you look in my basket at Whole Foods, you would think I'm a vegan that lives on special vegan products (because I buy all my regular food for cheaper at the grocery store and only use Whole Foods for the stuff I can't get elsewhere).

    Maybe the parent behind me at the grocery store does feed her kid frozen pizza without vegetables every night. Or maybe this is her mid-week stock-up shop and she's just picking up the frozen pizza because it's a crazy week and her fridge is already full of salad greens so she doesn't need any more. I don't know. That's why I refrain from forming an opinion on something that I don't know enough about.

    This is certainly true on an individual level. Looking in my buggy would give a skewed idea of my diet since most of my vegetables and fruit are not store bought. It might also look like we are pescatarian since on most trips the only meat we buy is fish/seafood.

    But when you live and shop in an area you see all the buggies on every trip. And it gives you a pretty good idea of how most people in your area eat. Looking at the roadside on garbage pickup day can also confirm this when you see multiple bags full of ultra-processed food packages.

    I do live and shop in an area. When I'm at my grocery store, seeing someone's cart, they may be getting their fruits and vegetables at the Farmer's Market like I do. They may be going to a place like Whole Foods for the foods a grocery store doesn't carry like I do. This may be their one monthly trip where they fill the pantry and then they do a weekly trip for fresh foods to add to the more processed stuff (like my mom did, when I was growing up).

    Looking at someone's cart gives you a really good idea of what they are buying on that day. And I'm sure they do plan to eat that stuff. But it is a much more problematic way to tell what they're actually eating, how much of it, and what other things they are eating.

    What do suppose the odds are that most people in an area shop the way you do? Pretty slim I'd imagine. Judging by the carts in my area and where we fall on the "healthy states" list, I stand by carts being a decent indicator.

    Where I live the Farmer's Markets are packed on the weekend.

    Does everyone shop the way I do? Of course not.

    But do *some* people? Yes. And when I'm looking at an individual's cart, I have no idea if that particular person shops the way I do or not.

    We seem to be talking apples and oranges since I stated quite clearly I was not talking about individuals.

    In order to draw your conclusions, aren't you looking at individual carts?

    Looking at all the carts. Some individually, some not, depending on how they line up in my eyesight. But either way taking the information as a whole, not individually.

    But for each of those individual carts that are making up the whole, you have no idea what else they are eating and buying . . . that's my point. Combining a bunch of individual carts into one conclusion is still based on individual carts.

    I get that you trust it as a way to draw conclusions. I'm saying that based on what I know of my shopping habits and what I know of the shopping habits of my family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors, I wouldn't draw conclusions based on that.

    Statistics back up my conclusions so I guess I'm just lucky to live in a area that doesn't have a lot of shopping options.

    Though if I did, I'm not sure it would matter as long as I saw a representative selection of carts from the various options. It's pretty safe to assume that most of the food bought will be consumed. So, if the majority of food in the majority of carts is ultra-processed food, I'd still put my money on that area eating a high % of u-p foods.

    If I lived in an area like mine, with lots of different shopping options, and I knew there was a popular WF (technically 2, as I am exactly 1 mile from 2 different ones) and various other grocery stores and green market and meat market and fish market and that they were popular in the area and then decided because I mostly shop in the 7-11 and saw a lot of people buying ultra processed junk food that everyone bought ultra processed junk food, that would be a mistake on my part.

    Anyway, I don't doubt the results of this study (the interpretation, maybe), and no one said "most people" don't buy a lot of ultra processed stuff (and I stand by my statement that many do not), but what someone in AL observes some other people in her neighborhood buying doesn't seem all that relevant to anything. No more than my neighborhood being health conscious means that obesity is not a problem in the US.
  • rosecropperrosecropper Posts: 340Member Member Posts: 340Member Member
    Processed foods aren't necessarily unhealthy, but it's hard to know what you're really getting with it. Yes I eat processed foods because they're easy & yummy, but I'm trying to make smarter choices.
    Ideally life would be like the garden of Eden where everything was good for eating- except you know, maybe that one tree they say will kill you if you eat from it.
    My personal concerns with processed foods:
    1. Origin- multi ingredient foods rarely state point of origin. Many mainstream foodstuffs are imported from places with less quality control and more environmental pollutants. Example: fancy organic chocolate can be high in lead because it's grown in areas where gasoline is still leaded. The smog falls out of the air on to the cocoa beans.
    2. Additives- FDA doesn't require "food processing aids" be revealed in ingredient lists. That includes defoamers, catalysts, clarifying agents / filter, bleaching agents, washing agents and hair / peeling, Staff plucking and waxing, ion exchange resins, agents freezing on contact to cooling agents, drying agents / anti-caking, enzymes, agents of acidification, alkalinization or neutralizing agents, flocculants and coagulants, biocides, preventatives and extraction solvents. Yuck!
    3. Transport- foods may not have been kept properly to prevent increased bacterial growth. Shipping containers are often fumigated with toxins that can contaminate food.
    4. Packaging- cans do leach toxins into food, especially those cooked in can. Plastic containers can leach toxins if exposed to heat.
    5. Handling- more hands/machines on the food=more opportunities for contamination, especially if ingredients from several sources are combined into a large batch then reportioned back into smaller servings (like commercially ground beef patties).
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