Calorie Counter

Message Boards Debate: Health and Fitness
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

How much fruit to eat per day

12467

Replies

  • briteyesbriteyes Member Posts: 435 Member Member Posts: 435 Member
    Hornsby wrote: »

    She understood what you were saying. The ideas are just kinda out there and well, not really true.

    Um, okay... LOL
  • HornsbyHornsby Member Posts: 10,372 Member Member Posts: 10,372 Member
    Laugh all ya want. Facts are facts.

    Can you tell me what will happen if I don't follow your "rules" you outlined?
    edited April 2016
  • auddiiauddii Member Posts: 15,410 Member Member Posts: 15,410 Member
    briteyes wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    Wat?

    I mean, I understand picking what works for you, but then you lost me in all the rules after that...

    It's quite simple - sorry if I confused you.

    Carbs and Fat together are essentially a no no. So either eat one or the other, but not both together.
    http://www.metaboliceffect.com/worst-food-combination-for-weight-loss/
    The best time to have carbs is around a workout. The worst time to have fat is right after a workout - it's proven that fat does not digested properly after a workout. That's why it is recommended to eat simple easy to digest carbs and easy to digest protein (i.e., chocolate milk and a banana, etc.)
    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/berardi4.htm

    So yeah, eat fruit if you want, but just do it right - even better if you can do it combined with a workout so you can put all that sugar to good use!

    There are plenty of studies on nutrient timing. But I would say that the vast majority of people on the planet do not need to concern themselves with that level of minutia.

    nutrient-timing-table_r4-01-1024x837.png
  • briteyesbriteyes Member Posts: 435 Member Member Posts: 435 Member
    I know what works for me and that's what I do. I've been able to lose fat and lean out and gain strength I never knew I had. I'm actually not huge on nutrient timing, I'm more of a LCHF person, but when I do allow carbs into my diet, those are the rules I follow. I tend to just avoid the carbs all together though - it's easier that way. But for someone that must have fruits, I recommend not just having them haphazardly, but following some sort of guidelines of when to eat them and with what.
  • GraceAnneU95GraceAnneU95 Member Posts: 18 Member Member Posts: 18 Member
    I think fruit probably does the opposite of bloat you because it's low in sodium and has a lot of water
  • ReaderGirl3ReaderGirl3 Member Posts: 868 Member Member Posts: 868 Member
    briteyes wrote: »
    auddii wrote: »
    Wat?

    I mean, I understand picking what works for you, but then you lost me in all the rules after that...

    It's quite simple - sorry if I confused you.

    Carbs and Fat together are essentially a no no. So either eat one or the other, but not both together.
    http://www.metaboliceffect.com/worst-food-combination-for-weight-loss/
    The best time to have carbs is around a workout. The worst time to have fat is right after a workout - it's proven that fat does not digested properly after a workout. That's why it is recommended to eat simple easy to digest carbs and easy to digest protein (i.e., chocolate milk and a banana, etc.)
    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/berardi4.htm

    So yeah, eat fruit if you want, but just do it right - even better if you can do it combined with a workout so you can put all that sugar to good use!

    Darn it, I lost 50lbs the wrong way :o

  • jgnatcajgnatca Member Posts: 14,495 Member Member Posts: 14,495 Member
    Yeh fruit bloats me up. And I suffer from blood sugar crashes

    Try having a little peanut butter with your apple to prevent the crashing. And you may be more of a vegetable guy.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 22,274 Member Member Posts: 22,274 Member
    briteyes wrote: »
    You could eat fruit all day and not gain weight. You'll more likely gain weight from consuming fatty foods.
    Fat consumed is easily stored. It is not readily used as an energy source and therefore not burned unless you are eating very little carbs (which is an unhealthy practice).
    Carbs, on the other hand, are readily used as energy but not so easily stored. Once your body can no longer use the calories from carbs as energy, the carbs are not stored as fat. They are stored as glycogen in the liver and the muscles. It is only after those stores are filled that carbs can be stored as fat. And you would have to eat WAY more carbs than you realistically already eat in order to do that.
    So eat as much fruit as you'd like! Curb the fat.
    Source: Lost 25+ pounds on a high carb low-fat diet.

    It is not unhealthy to eat low carbs. It is however unhealthy to eat high carbs and high fat together, which is likely what has caused most overweight people to be overweight. Teaching the body how to use fat for fuel is a very efficient way to lose body fat, maintain muscle mass, and actually achieve your weight loss goals once and for all. High Fat Low Carb all the way every day! That's what keeps the doctor away!People need to pick their diet and stick with it. Or cycle it properly. Don't eat fat with carbs, and when you eat carbs be sure to use them up before they're stored as fat. If you're not going to be working out, skip the carbs, but not the fat. If you just worked out, skip the fat and go for some protein/carbs - especially some fruit!!!
    Source: Lost 25 pounds eating HFLC.

    Eating food in excess caused me to be overweight.

    I find fruit more satiating when I pair it with fat - apples and cheese or peanut butter is a great example. I have no problem digesting fruit with other foods, and wish I had never read food alchemy 'Fit For Life' in the 90s as it caused me to be fearful of eating fruit and I turned to higher calorie sweet foods.
    edited April 2016
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    Yeah, I probably have fruit most often for breakfast, with my vegetable omelet. So fruit and fat.

    I also like apples with pork chops.

    I have a banana before or after a workout sometimes too, but see no particular difference between having fruit with fat or without.

    I'm grateful I never got the anti-fruit message.
  • yarwellyarwell Member Posts: 10,567 Member Member Posts: 10,567 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Side observation, the only people I know who are filled up or feel satiated by fat, are those following LCHF. So out of curiosity, what do you find fills you up more: an 8oz piece of chicken or an 8 oz ribeye?

    seems an overly large amount of meat for a meal but I don't really buy chicken so can't comment.

    I think the LCHF people are really saying that their diet is satiating, not a specific food item out of context. So a carbivore may be satisfied by a starch bomb potato but not the equivalent amount of something fatty, especially if they eat like a bison rather than a lion ie large volumes are key for them.

    I don't doubt that tested individually in the context of a mixed diet the fatty foods may not be that satiating, but it's well recorded that LCHF or perhaps just LC voluntarily reduce calorie intake when told to eat ad lib. Studies have shown that for 60 years or more.
    edited April 2016
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,681 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,681 MFP Moderator
    yarwell wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Side observation, the only people I know who are filled up or feel satiated by fat, are those following LCHF. So out of curiosity, what do you find fills you up more: an 8oz piece of chicken or an 8 oz ribeye?

    seems an overly large amount of meat for a meal but I don't really buy chicken so can't comment.

    I think the LCHF people are really saying that their diet is satiating, not a specific food item out of context. So a carbivore may be satisfied by a starch bomb potato but not the equivalent amount of something fatty, especially if they eat like a bison rather than a lion ie large volumes are key for them.

    I don't doubt that tested individually in the context of a mixed diet the fatty foods may not be that satiating, but it's well recorded that LCHF or perhaps just LC voluntarily reduce calorie intake when told to eat ad lib. Studies have shown that for 60 years or more.

    It would only be a large amount of meat for someone who has a lower TDEE, poor body composition or someone not active. Comparing you and I, there is a 1000 calorie difference, 20 years difference and I suspect there are other big difference between body composition and maybe activity level (BTW, if you go over to the gaining weight section, the average person there is maintaining at 2800-3300 calories, so I would fall in the standard deviation there). But then again, I have always been a huge volume eater. As a teen I was eating large or extra large pizzas, 3 McDonalds BigMacs, etc... And my son seems to be following in my footsteps. As a 5 1/2 month old, he is eating more food than any of my friends 1 years olds... has transitioned to solids much quicker and now has advanced stages within solids (for a benchmark, he will eat a whole avocado at 200g and a banana at 120g).

    And I recognize that low carb can be satiating but that would be based on how it's implemented, not difference than my current diet.
    edited April 2016
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,681 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,681 MFP Moderator
    briteyes wrote: »
    I know what works for me and that's what I do. I've been able to lose fat and lean out and gain strength I never knew I had. I'm actually not huge on nutrient timing, I'm more of a LCHF person, but when I do allow carbs into my diet, those are the rules I follow. I tend to just avoid the carbs all together though - it's easier that way. But for someone that must have fruits, I recommend not just having them haphazardly, but following some sort of guidelines of when to eat them and with what.

    While its great that you found a path that works for you, many of us have found that same success (fat loss, leaned out, increased strength, etc...) while going against all those rules.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,681 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,681 MFP Moderator
    Yeh fruit bloats me up. And I suffer from blood sugar crashes

    Is it all fruits that cause you to bloat? I know several piece allergic to specific fruits.
  • MeanderingMammalMeanderingMammal Member Posts: 7,870 Member Member Posts: 7,870 Member
    briteyes wrote: »
    So yeah, eat fruit if you want, but just do it right

    Where doing it right is a function of putting it in your mouth, chewing, swallowing whilst dismissing all the food combination nonsense as out of date woo.

    To the OP, if you find fruit adversely affects your digestion, then avoid it, or identify fruits that don't have that effect.

    Personally I generally have six or seven portions a day, sometimes ten to twelve depending on my calorie needs after a long training session.
  • J72FITJ72FIT Member Posts: 5,543 Member Member Posts: 5,543 Member
    briteyes wrote: »
    You could eat fruit all day and not gain weight. You'll more likely gain weight from consuming fatty foods.
    Fat consumed is easily stored. It is not readily used as an energy source and therefore not burned unless you are eating very little carbs (which is an unhealthy practice).
    Carbs, on the other hand, are readily used as energy but not so easily stored. Once your body can no longer use the calories from carbs as energy, the carbs are not stored as fat. They are stored as glycogen in the liver and the muscles. It is only after those stores are filled that carbs can be stored as fat. And you would have to eat WAY more carbs than you realistically already eat in order to do that.
    So eat as much fruit as you'd like! Curb the fat.
    Source: Lost 25+ pounds on a high carb low-fat diet.

    It is not unhealthy to eat low carbs. It is however unhealthy to eat high carbs and high fat together, which is likely what has caused most overweight people to be overweight. Teaching the body how to use fat for fuel is a very efficient way to lose body fat, maintain muscle mass, and actually achieve your weight loss goals once and for all. High Fat Low Carb all the way every day! That's what keeps the doctor away!People need to pick their diet and stick with it. Or cycle it properly. Don't eat fat with carbs, and when you eat carbs be sure to use them up before they're stored as fat. If you're not going to be working out, skip the carbs, but not the fat. If you just worked out, skip the fat and go for some protein/carbs - especially some fruit!!!
    Source: Lost 25 pounds eating HFLC.

    Once again, confusing the how with the why...
  • yarwellyarwell Member Posts: 10,567 Member Member Posts: 10,567 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    yarwell wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Side observation, the only people I know who are filled up or feel satiated by fat, are those following LCHF. So out of curiosity, what do you find fills you up more: an 8oz piece of chicken or an 8 oz ribeye?

    seems an overly large amount of meat for a meal but I don't really buy chicken so can't comment.

    I think the LCHF people are really saying that their diet is satiating, not a specific food item out of context. So a carbivore may be satisfied by a starch bomb potato but not the equivalent amount of something fatty, especially if they eat like a bison rather than a lion ie large volumes are key for them.

    I don't doubt that tested individually in the context of a mixed diet the fatty foods may not be that satiating, but it's well recorded that LCHF or perhaps just LC voluntarily reduce calorie intake when told to eat ad lib. Studies have shown that for 60 years or more.

    It would only be a large amount of meat for someone who has a lower TDEE, poor body composition or someone not active. Comparing you and I, there is a 1000 calorie difference, 20 years difference and I suspect there are other big difference between body composition and maybe activity level (BTW, if you go over to the gaining weight section, the average person there is maintaining at 2800-3300 calories, so I would fall in the standard deviation there). But then again, I have always been a huge volume eater. As a teen I was eating large or extra large pizzas, 3 McDonalds BigMacs, etc... And my son seems to be following in my footsteps. As a 5 1/2 month old, he is eating more food than any of my friends 1 years olds... has transitioned to solids much quicker and now has advanced stages within solids (for a benchmark, he will eat a whole avocado at 200g and a banana at 120g).

    An 8 oz portion of meat at a meal sounds like part of the "how to get fat" playbook. As you got fat eating all those things I hope you're going to give your son a better lead in due course ;-)

    600 calories and 63 grams of protein, the latter being the RDI, seems excessive for the typical human at a meal by any objective measure.
  • auddiiauddii Member Posts: 15,410 Member Member Posts: 15,410 Member
    yarwell wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    yarwell wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Side observation, the only people I know who are filled up or feel satiated by fat, are those following LCHF. So out of curiosity, what do you find fills you up more: an 8oz piece of chicken or an 8 oz ribeye?

    seems an overly large amount of meat for a meal but I don't really buy chicken so can't comment.

    I think the LCHF people are really saying that their diet is satiating, not a specific food item out of context. So a carbivore may be satisfied by a starch bomb potato but not the equivalent amount of something fatty, especially if they eat like a bison rather than a lion ie large volumes are key for them.

    I don't doubt that tested individually in the context of a mixed diet the fatty foods may not be that satiating, but it's well recorded that LCHF or perhaps just LC voluntarily reduce calorie intake when told to eat ad lib. Studies have shown that for 60 years or more.

    It would only be a large amount of meat for someone who has a lower TDEE, poor body composition or someone not active. Comparing you and I, there is a 1000 calorie difference, 20 years difference and I suspect there are other big difference between body composition and maybe activity level (BTW, if you go over to the gaining weight section, the average person there is maintaining at 2800-3300 calories, so I would fall in the standard deviation there). But then again, I have always been a huge volume eater. As a teen I was eating large or extra large pizzas, 3 McDonalds BigMacs, etc... And my son seems to be following in my footsteps. As a 5 1/2 month old, he is eating more food than any of my friends 1 years olds... has transitioned to solids much quicker and now has advanced stages within solids (for a benchmark, he will eat a whole avocado at 200g and a banana at 120g).

    An 8 oz portion of meat at a meal sounds like part of the "how to get fat" playbook. As you got fat eating all those things I hope you're going to give your son a better lead in due course ;-)

    600 calories and 63 grams of protein, the latter being the RDI, seems excessive for the typical human at a meal by any objective measure.

    Why? Many chicken breasts in the US are around 8oz (and that's cooked). If I eat an entire one, it's a little less than 400 calories and almost 70g of protein. If I eat that much chicken, I will usually pair it with some roasted vegetables, and not much else. The entire meal will end up being around 600 calories.

    How will that make me "get fat"?
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,681 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 36,681 MFP Moderator
    yarwell wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    yarwell wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Side observation, the only people I know who are filled up or feel satiated by fat, are those following LCHF. So out of curiosity, what do you find fills you up more: an 8oz piece of chicken or an 8 oz ribeye?

    seems an overly large amount of meat for a meal but I don't really buy chicken so can't comment.

    I think the LCHF people are really saying that their diet is satiating, not a specific food item out of context. So a carbivore may be satisfied by a starch bomb potato but not the equivalent amount of something fatty, especially if they eat like a bison rather than a lion ie large volumes are key for them.

    I don't doubt that tested individually in the context of a mixed diet the fatty foods may not be that satiating, but it's well recorded that LCHF or perhaps just LC voluntarily reduce calorie intake when told to eat ad lib. Studies have shown that for 60 years or more.

    It would only be a large amount of meat for someone who has a lower TDEE, poor body composition or someone not active. Comparing you and I, there is a 1000 calorie difference, 20 years difference and I suspect there are other big difference between body composition and maybe activity level (BTW, if you go over to the gaining weight section, the average person there is maintaining at 2800-3300 calories, so I would fall in the standard deviation there). But then again, I have always been a huge volume eater. As a teen I was eating large or extra large pizzas, 3 McDonalds BigMacs, etc... And my son seems to be following in my footsteps. As a 5 1/2 month old, he is eating more food than any of my friends 1 years olds... has transitioned to solids much quicker and now has advanced stages within solids (for a benchmark, he will eat a whole avocado at 200g and a banana at 120g).

    An 8 oz portion of meat at a meal sounds like part of the "how to get fat" playbook. As you got fat eating all those things I hope you're going to give your son a better lead in due course ;-)

    600 calories and 63 grams of protein, the latter being the RDI, seems excessive for the typical human at a meal by any objective measure.

    To a sedentary person, I may agree with you. But I am not sedentary and my maintenance levels are 3000 calories. If I had an equivalent diet at your levels, it would be a starvation diet. So it's all about context. Some people just have higher requirements.
  • French_PeasantFrench_Peasant Member Posts: 1,631 Member Member Posts: 1,631 Member
    briteyes wrote: »
    I know what works for me and that's what I do. I've been able to lose fat and lean out and gain strength I never knew I had. I'm actually not huge on nutrient timing, I'm more of a LCHF person, but when I do allow carbs into my diet, those are the rules I follow. I tend to just avoid the carbs all together though - it's easier that way. But for someone that must have fruits, I recommend not just having them haphazardly, but following some sort of guidelines of when to eat them and with what.

    Then say that rather than posting a bunch of wacky and arbitrary rules or as you say above "guidelines". I lost the exact same amount as you (and more, but I wasn't tracking for several months) by eating things like an apple with a piece of cheddar or a pear with brie or grapes with chevre, and--once I started tracking and working out--utterly ignoring my trainer's mandated carb macros and just hitting the protein macro. I gained my strength by picking up and putting down heavy things, repeatedly, over an extended period of time.
  • tlflag1620tlflag1620 Member Posts: 1,358 Member Member Posts: 1,358 Member
    yarwell wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    yarwell wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »

    Side observation, the only people I know who are filled up or feel satiated by fat, are those following LCHF. So out of curiosity, what do you find fills you up more: an 8oz piece of chicken or an 8 oz ribeye?

    seems an overly large amount of meat for a meal but I don't really buy chicken so can't comment.

    I think the LCHF people are really saying that their diet is satiating, not a specific food item out of context. So a carbivore may be satisfied by a starch bomb potato but not the equivalent amount of something fatty, especially if they eat like a bison rather than a lion ie large volumes are key for them.

    I don't doubt that tested individually in the context of a mixed diet the fatty foods may not be that satiating, but it's well recorded that LCHF or perhaps just LC voluntarily reduce calorie intake when told to eat ad lib. Studies have shown that for 60 years or more.

    It would only be a large amount of meat for someone who has a lower TDEE, poor body composition or someone not active. Comparing you and I, there is a 1000 calorie difference, 20 years difference and I suspect there are other big difference between body composition and maybe activity level (BTW, if you go over to the gaining weight section, the average person there is maintaining at 2800-3300 calories, so I would fall in the standard deviation there). But then again, I have always been a huge volume eater. As a teen I was eating large or extra large pizzas, 3 McDonalds BigMacs, etc... And my son seems to be following in my footsteps. As a 5 1/2 month old, he is eating more food than any of my friends 1 years olds... has transitioned to solids much quicker and now has advanced stages within solids (for a benchmark, he will eat a whole avocado at 200g and a banana at 120g).

    An 8 oz portion of meat at a meal sounds like part of the "how to get fat" playbook. As you got fat eating all those things I hope you're going to give your son a better lead in due course ;-)

    600 calories and 63 grams of protein, the latter being the RDI, seems excessive for the typical human at a meal by any objective measure.

    I routinely eat 8 oz of meat at dinner (at least that, often more). I'm a 5'7" female, 145 lbs, 35 years old, and breastfeeding my 8 month old. I need the calories and the protein. But, then, I prefer to eat two or three large meals rather than nibbling throughout the day. For me nice, big, juicy portions of beef, pork, poultry, or fish with my dinner keep me thin. I don't usually feel the need to snack in the evening, and the treats I keep on hand for my kids aren't half as appealing or tempting when I'm still nice and full from dinner.
Sign In or Register to comment.