Teacher says Pop Tarts are not a healthy snack

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  • Noreenmarie1234
    Noreenmarie1234 Posts: 7,492 Member
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    I don't know. I mean no they aren't "healthy". They are part of a balanced healthy diet but I don't know anyone who would say they are a healthy snack. I don't think the teacher was right banning certain foods, but is it something he eats every day? Eating a poptart every single day isn't the best habit to be in at such a young age. I think the school is just trying to encourage healthy eating and for parents to bring in healthy snacks such as veggies, fruit, etc. I agree that is is frustrating that some items would be considered "healthy" but have just as much, if not more sugar. (For example a fruit flavored yogurt and standard nutrigrain granola bar).

    I just know that most people I know who eat a pack of poptarts every day do not have a healthy lifestyle and are not at a healthy weight. I think they are just trying to lay the groundwork and habits for a healthy lifestyle in the future. You are right that it is ridiculous to completely ban foods like that, but I think they are right in what they are attempting to do. (set healthy lifelong habits)
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    edited January 2017
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    robininfl wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    What bothers me a bit is this whole "snack time" thing. For elementary kids school starts at 9am. Perhaps they ate at 8am? Lunch is at 12:00 and the kids are done at 3:00ish. In the morning that is a 4 hour window of no food, and in the afternoon, it is just over 3 hours. Most kids can go that long between meals by time they are a year old. Why the regression?

    As long as the kids' meals aren't too high GI, they should be able to go 4 hours without food. Kids used to not snack at school. We weren't even allowed gum. I don't remember it being a problem.
    .

    They do lunch in shifts though - school starts at 7:30, some kids eat lunch at 10:30AM, and then don't get home till 4, latest shift may eat at 1:30pm, etc. They don't all get to have lunch at the exact same time, at the exact midpoint of the day; many do athletics after school, others are in aftercare till 6, since parents generally have to work to support a family. I don't think snack time should be mandated OR banned, it's reasonable to have it as an option. Not everyone can get home in time for afternoon tea.

    I can see where a snack might be needed in there. A 5 hour stretch can be much - if it is class time. Kids should be able to bring snacks to eat if they need to stay late or arrive early to school.

    I played on sports teams and was often at school until 5:30, or there by 7am. I didn't bring extra food though. I just saved an apple for later. My usual lunch was half a pita with meat, cheese and veggies, an apple and a juice box. I was older then. 12 to 18. We weren't allowed snacks in class but there were short times to snack between classes or afterschool. I don't remember snacking.

    I never bought food either. I don't think I spent more than $10 a year on snacks at school.
  • brower47
    brower47 Posts: 16,356 Member
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    brower47 wrote: »
    cnbbnc wrote: »
    My thought is that the schools don't like sugary snacks because some kids may get hyper. I could be mistaken though.... I don't think it's ok for teacher to be criticizing what kids bring to school.

    I got so pissed when my son was going to camp and they would discuss healthy foods. Kids that brought "healthy" foods got to wear a healthy hat. My son was all upset one day because when the camp counselor saw his lunch he didn't get a hat. Mind you I'm paying this camp good money and they're inspecting my kids lunch!

    To sum it up, I would be aggravated too.

    I keep seeing the "teachers are avoiding hyperactivity" excuse in this thread a lot. Sugar does not cause hyperactivity. It's a strongly held onto old wives tale. Science says that belief is bunk.

    http://www.yalescientific.org/2010/09/mythbusters-does-sugar-really-make-children-hyper/

    Stop blaming bad behavior on sugar. The poor nutrient is unfairly blamed for so much already.

    My friends ex makes sure to load up the kids with sugary drinks and lollies right before he drops them back off to her on Sunday nights, just to *kitten* her off! I swear sometimes he drops them off and their pupils have turned a blood red and their heads are spinning 360 round and round... Just kidding, but they are definitely pinging off the walls and overly hyper :(

    Maybe they are glad to be away from a parent who obviously doesn't have his children's best interests at heart and likes to use them as a weapon. I'd be pinging off the walls to get away from a *kitten* too.
  • brower47
    brower47 Posts: 16,356 Member
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    Packerjohn wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    cnbbnc wrote: »
    My thought is that the schools don't like sugary snacks because some kids may get hyper. I could be mistaken though.... I don't think it's ok for teacher to be criticizing what kids bring to school.

    I got so pissed when my son was going to camp and they would discuss healthy foods. Kids that brought "healthy" foods got to wear a healthy hat. My son was all upset one day because when the camp counselor saw his lunch he didn't get a hat. Mind you I'm paying this camp good money and they're inspecting my kids lunch!

    To sum it up, I would be aggravated too.

    I keep seeing the "teachers are avoiding hyperactivity" excuse in this thread a lot. Sugar does not cause hyperactivity. It's a strongly held onto old wives tale. Science says that belief is bunk.

    http://www.yalescientific.org/2010/09/mythbusters-does-sugar-really-make-children-hyper/

    Stop blaming bad behavior on sugar. The poor nutrient is unfairly blamed for so much already.

    If you read the article you posted there are also studies saying sugar influences behavior, especially in kids with ADHD.

    I buy into the theory that activities associated with sweets like birthday parties increase hyperactivity.

    I read the article, even the bit about how activities surrounding special food can affect behavior. But that doesn't really apply to this topic. If you chose to stay on topic, you'll recall that they have a snack every day. This isn't special occasion food, it's routine. The sugar content of the snack is not causing hyperactivity, the proposed fear of the teacher for not wanting the kid to eat a sugary food.

    But if you want to help keep the bad information alive, that sugar causes hyperactivity, it won't be hard. It's very hard to kill a lie once it's been repeated enough to be taken as truth.


    You apparently missed this part of the article you posted.

    "Nonetheless, other experiments show that sugar may at least influence behavior. Dr. Wesnes conducted a study in which he found that having a large amount of sugar for breakfast led to a severe deterioration of attention span when compared to having no breakfast or eating whole grain cereal. Dr. Tamborlane, also from Yale, reported that children given sugar had higher levels of adrenaline. A possible explanation for this effect is that since sugar is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream, blood sugar rises quickly, which can lead to higher adrenaline levels and thus symptoms similar to those associated with hyperactivity. Furthermore, children with ADHD also tend to have higher levels of insulin."

    Don't think the question is black and white.

    Didn't miss it.

    May influence =/= cause

    Would you like to try to point out something else you're worried I might have missed?
  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
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    In preschool, we had snack time around 10 and no lunch, but there was no such thing as full day preschools where I lived. Preschools started at 745 and ended by 1230. Parents would drop me off on way to work, and our Au Pair would pick me up around 1230 along with one of my friends who had no child care. When we got home we had lunch and that was basically it until Mom came home to make dinner (unless my brother had a sports event and then everything got topsy turvey).

    Kindergarten was also only half day and they dismissed at 11:30. I don't recall there being a snack time at all. Since most parents worked, a local preschool had a "afternoon kindergarten" session and worked with the school to provide bus transportation there since most kids went. We would get there around 12:30 and had lunch (packed by parents). If your parents couldn't afford to send you with lunch, they would give you a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and an apple. All kids got either milk or chocolate milk everyday. There was no afternoon snack time.

    In elementary school ther was only recess and lunch, unless it was a special occasion. No snack time at all. Lunch was either a choice of a hot lunch (the special of the day), a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, or turkey and cheese sandwich. Both got canned fruit and milk. For .25 you could upgrade your milk to chocolate milk. They also had iced cream for sale for 1.25. Did t like any of the options? You could bring lunch from home.

    Middle school and high school were drastically different since I went to prep school. Parents had to buy meal plans for their kids that either included or excluded weekend meals (some students went home for the weekends). Depending on your class schedule, you fit in meals. Cafeteria was open from 6am-9am for breakfast, 11-2 for lunch and 4-730 for dinner. You always had some sort of hour break during meal times. Every dorm also had a kitchen, so you had the option of your own breakfast and snacks if you wanted them (had to be labeled). Most kids also had mini fridges starting in 9th grade (6-9 they monitored you more closely since you are younger) but certain items were prohibited and if you got caught with them more than once, you could be expelled.
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,423 Member
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    nvmomketo wrote: »
    What bothers me a bit is this whole "snack time" thing. For elementary kids school starts at 9am. Perhaps they ate at 8am? Lunch is at 12:00 and the kids are done at 3:00ish. In the morning that is a 4 hour window of no food, and in the afternoon, it is just over 3 hours. Most kids can go that long between meals by time they are a year old. Why the regression?

    As long as the kids' meals aren't too high GI, they should be able to go 4 hours without food. Kids used to not snack at school. We weren't even allowed gum. I don't remember it being a problem.
    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??

    It was still there, but the kids weren't as protected. My neighbour had a peanut allergy that was severe. He ended up the hospital a few times per year because kids ate peanut butter around him.

    I was thinking about this too. We did not have a scheduled snack time at school when I was in first grade.
    In grade school: Food was not allowed in the classroom unless it was approved by the teacher in advance- like for a birthday or Valentine's day. Pop was not allowed ever. We didn't have many more food restrictions than that I don't think in 1980-87ish grade school. If someone had allergies it was not mentioned that I remember. There were commonly nuts, peanut butter, dairy products in the school lunches.
    At 3-3:30 pm I walked home and my mom would let me eat dry cereal or fruit for an after school snack.
    After dinner we would sometimes have popcorn for a snack.

    When we went places my parents did not carry snacks with us. It just wasn't expected that we would snack very much between meals. My dd eats more often than I did as a child so I'm not against snacks but the idea of having to have a snack or two during the school day seems a bit odd still.
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
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    brower47 wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    cnbbnc wrote: »
    My thought is that the schools don't like sugary snacks because some kids may get hyper. I could be mistaken though.... I don't think it's ok for teacher to be criticizing what kids bring to school.

    I got so pissed when my son was going to camp and they would discuss healthy foods. Kids that brought "healthy" foods got to wear a healthy hat. My son was all upset one day because when the camp counselor saw his lunch he didn't get a hat. Mind you I'm paying this camp good money and they're inspecting my kids lunch!

    To sum it up, I would be aggravated too.

    I keep seeing the "teachers are avoiding hyperactivity" excuse in this thread a lot. Sugar does not cause hyperactivity. It's a strongly held onto old wives tale. Science says that belief is bunk.

    http://www.yalescientific.org/2010/09/mythbusters-does-sugar-really-make-children-hyper/

    Stop blaming bad behavior on sugar. The poor nutrient is unfairly blamed for so much already.

    If you read the article you posted there are also studies saying sugar influences behavior, especially in kids with ADHD.

    I buy into the theory that activities associated with sweets like birthday parties increase hyperactivity.

    I read the article, even the bit about how activities surrounding special food can affect behavior. But that doesn't really apply to this topic. If you chose to stay on topic, you'll recall that they have a snack every day. This isn't special occasion food, it's routine. The sugar content of the snack is not causing hyperactivity, the proposed fear of the teacher for not wanting the kid to eat a sugary food.

    But if you want to help keep the bad information alive, that sugar causes hyperactivity, it won't be hard. It's very hard to kill a lie once it's been repeated enough to be taken as truth.


    You apparently missed this part of the article you posted.

    "Nonetheless, other experiments show that sugar may at least influence behavior. Dr. Wesnes conducted a study in which he found that having a large amount of sugar for breakfast led to a severe deterioration of attention span when compared to having no breakfast or eating whole grain cereal. Dr. Tamborlane, also from Yale, reported that children given sugar had higher levels of adrenaline. A possible explanation for this effect is that since sugar is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream, blood sugar rises quickly, which can lead to higher adrenaline levels and thus symptoms similar to those associated with hyperactivity. Furthermore, children with ADHD also tend to have higher levels of insulin."

    Don't think the question is black and white.

    Didn't miss it.

    May influence =/= cause

    Would you like to try to point out something else you're worried I might have missed?

    Whatever, just pointing out your article showed an alternative view that you failed to mention.

    Carry on.
  • kami3006
    kami3006 Posts: 4,978 Member
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    Lounmoun wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    What bothers me a bit is this whole "snack time" thing. For elementary kids school starts at 9am. Perhaps they ate at 8am? Lunch is at 12:00 and the kids are done at 3:00ish. In the morning that is a 4 hour window of no food, and in the afternoon, it is just over 3 hours. Most kids can go that long between meals by time they are a year old. Why the regression?

    As long as the kids' meals aren't too high GI, they should be able to go 4 hours without food. Kids used to not snack at school. We weren't even allowed gum. I don't remember it being a problem.
    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??

    It was still there, but the kids weren't as protected. My neighbour had a peanut allergy that was severe. He ended up the hospital a few times per year because kids ate peanut butter around him.

    I was thinking about this too. We did not have a scheduled snack time at school when I was in first grade.
    In grade school: Food was not allowed in the classroom unless it was approved by the teacher in advance- like for a birthday or Valentine's day. Pop was not allowed ever. We didn't have many more food restrictions than that I don't think in 1980-87ish grade school. If someone had allergies it was not mentioned that I remember. There were commonly nuts, peanut butter, dairy products in the school lunches.
    At 3-3:30 pm I walked home and my mom would let me eat dry cereal or fruit for an after school snack.
    After dinner we would sometimes have popcorn for a snack.

    When we went places my parents did not carry snacks with us. It just wasn't expected that we would snack very much between meals. My dd eats more often than I did as a child so I'm not against snacks but the idea of having to have a snack or two during the school day seems a bit odd still.

    My daughter's kindergarten, first and second grade teachers kept goldfish in the classroom or allow kids to bring a snack for sometime in the morning. They all said it was because the kids would start to lose focus part way through the morning and a quick snack made a noticeable difference in their attention.
  • crzycatlady1
    crzycatlady1 Posts: 1,930 Member
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    kami3006 wrote: »
    Lounmoun wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    What bothers me a bit is this whole "snack time" thing. For elementary kids school starts at 9am. Perhaps they ate at 8am? Lunch is at 12:00 and the kids are done at 3:00ish. In the morning that is a 4 hour window of no food, and in the afternoon, it is just over 3 hours. Most kids can go that long between meals by time they are a year old. Why the regression?

    As long as the kids' meals aren't too high GI, they should be able to go 4 hours without food. Kids used to not snack at school. We weren't even allowed gum. I don't remember it being a problem.
    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??

    It was still there, but the kids weren't as protected. My neighbour had a peanut allergy that was severe. He ended up the hospital a few times per year because kids ate peanut butter around him.

    I was thinking about this too. We did not have a scheduled snack time at school when I was in first grade.
    In grade school: Food was not allowed in the classroom unless it was approved by the teacher in advance- like for a birthday or Valentine's day. Pop was not allowed ever. We didn't have many more food restrictions than that I don't think in 1980-87ish grade school. If someone had allergies it was not mentioned that I remember. There were commonly nuts, peanut butter, dairy products in the school lunches.
    At 3-3:30 pm I walked home and my mom would let me eat dry cereal or fruit for an after school snack.
    After dinner we would sometimes have popcorn for a snack.

    When we went places my parents did not carry snacks with us. It just wasn't expected that we would snack very much between meals. My dd eats more often than I did as a child so I'm not against snacks but the idea of having to have a snack or two during the school day seems a bit odd still.

    My daughter's kindergarten, first and second grade teachers kept goldfish in the classroom or allow kids to bring a snack for sometime in the morning. They all said it was because the kids would start to lose focus part way through the morning and a quick snack made a noticeable difference in their attention.

    Whereas my kids' teacher forbade kids to eat gold fish crackers because they weren't 'healthy ' :p
  • AlabasterVerve
    AlabasterVerve Posts: 3,171 Member
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    kami3006 wrote: »
    Lounmoun wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    What bothers me a bit is this whole "snack time" thing. For elementary kids school starts at 9am. Perhaps they ate at 8am? Lunch is at 12:00 and the kids are done at 3:00ish. In the morning that is a 4 hour window of no food, and in the afternoon, it is just over 3 hours. Most kids can go that long between meals by time they are a year old. Why the regression?

    As long as the kids' meals aren't too high GI, they should be able to go 4 hours without food. Kids used to not snack at school. We weren't even allowed gum. I don't remember it being a problem.
    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??

    It was still there, but the kids weren't as protected. My neighbour had a peanut allergy that was severe. He ended up the hospital a few times per year because kids ate peanut butter around him.

    I was thinking about this too. We did not have a scheduled snack time at school when I was in first grade.
    In grade school: Food was not allowed in the classroom unless it was approved by the teacher in advance- like for a birthday or Valentine's day. Pop was not allowed ever. We didn't have many more food restrictions than that I don't think in 1980-87ish grade school. If someone had allergies it was not mentioned that I remember. There were commonly nuts, peanut butter, dairy products in the school lunches.
    At 3-3:30 pm I walked home and my mom would let me eat dry cereal or fruit for an after school snack.
    After dinner we would sometimes have popcorn for a snack.

    When we went places my parents did not carry snacks with us. It just wasn't expected that we would snack very much between meals. My dd eats more often than I did as a child so I'm not against snacks but the idea of having to have a snack or two during the school day seems a bit odd still.

    My daughter's kindergarten, first and second grade teachers kept goldfish in the classroom or allow kids to bring a snack for sometime in the morning. They all said it was because the kids would start to lose focus part way through the morning and a quick snack made a noticeable difference in their attention.

    We had stretch breaks which I remember we loooved. The teacher would have us stand by our desk, touch our toes, reached towards the ceiling and that sort of thing... was great fun and I imagine it served the same purpose.
  • kami3006
    kami3006 Posts: 4,978 Member
    Options
    kami3006 wrote: »
    Lounmoun wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    What bothers me a bit is this whole "snack time" thing. For elementary kids school starts at 9am. Perhaps they ate at 8am? Lunch is at 12:00 and the kids are done at 3:00ish. In the morning that is a 4 hour window of no food, and in the afternoon, it is just over 3 hours. Most kids can go that long between meals by time they are a year old. Why the regression?

    As long as the kids' meals aren't too high GI, they should be able to go 4 hours without food. Kids used to not snack at school. We weren't even allowed gum. I don't remember it being a problem.
    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??

    It was still there, but the kids weren't as protected. My neighbour had a peanut allergy that was severe. He ended up the hospital a few times per year because kids ate peanut butter around him.

    I was thinking about this too. We did not have a scheduled snack time at school when I was in first grade.
    In grade school: Food was not allowed in the classroom unless it was approved by the teacher in advance- like for a birthday or Valentine's day. Pop was not allowed ever. We didn't have many more food restrictions than that I don't think in 1980-87ish grade school. If someone had allergies it was not mentioned that I remember. There were commonly nuts, peanut butter, dairy products in the school lunches.
    At 3-3:30 pm I walked home and my mom would let me eat dry cereal or fruit for an after school snack.
    After dinner we would sometimes have popcorn for a snack.

    When we went places my parents did not carry snacks with us. It just wasn't expected that we would snack very much between meals. My dd eats more often than I did as a child so I'm not against snacks but the idea of having to have a snack or two during the school day seems a bit odd still.

    My daughter's kindergarten, first and second grade teachers kept goldfish in the classroom or allow kids to bring a snack for sometime in the morning. They all said it was because the kids would start to lose focus part way through the morning and a quick snack made a noticeable difference in their attention.

    We had stretch breaks which I remember we loooved. The teacher would have us stand by our desk, touch our toes, reached towards the ceiling and that sort of thing... was great fun and I imagine it served the same purpose.


    They did that too.
  • kami3006
    kami3006 Posts: 4,978 Member
    Options
    kami3006 wrote: »
    Lounmoun wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    What bothers me a bit is this whole "snack time" thing. For elementary kids school starts at 9am. Perhaps they ate at 8am? Lunch is at 12:00 and the kids are done at 3:00ish. In the morning that is a 4 hour window of no food, and in the afternoon, it is just over 3 hours. Most kids can go that long between meals by time they are a year old. Why the regression?

    As long as the kids' meals aren't too high GI, they should be able to go 4 hours without food. Kids used to not snack at school. We weren't even allowed gum. I don't remember it being a problem.
    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??

    It was still there, but the kids weren't as protected. My neighbour had a peanut allergy that was severe. He ended up the hospital a few times per year because kids ate peanut butter around him.

    I was thinking about this too. We did not have a scheduled snack time at school when I was in first grade.
    In grade school: Food was not allowed in the classroom unless it was approved by the teacher in advance- like for a birthday or Valentine's day. Pop was not allowed ever. We didn't have many more food restrictions than that I don't think in 1980-87ish grade school. If someone had allergies it was not mentioned that I remember. There were commonly nuts, peanut butter, dairy products in the school lunches.
    At 3-3:30 pm I walked home and my mom would let me eat dry cereal or fruit for an after school snack.
    After dinner we would sometimes have popcorn for a snack.

    When we went places my parents did not carry snacks with us. It just wasn't expected that we would snack very much between meals. My dd eats more often than I did as a child so I'm not against snacks but the idea of having to have a snack or two during the school day seems a bit odd still.

    My daughter's kindergarten, first and second grade teachers kept goldfish in the classroom or allow kids to bring a snack for sometime in the morning. They all said it was because the kids would start to lose focus part way through the morning and a quick snack made a noticeable difference in their attention.

    Whereas my kids' teacher forbade kids to eat gold fish crackers because they weren't 'healthy ' :p

    Yeah, someone up thread said the same.
  • lizzymcg
    lizzymcg Posts: 47 Member
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    When my son first went to preschool, I read through the agreements relating to food and followed everything to the letter. I didn't include any snacks or treats because it was so strictly worded. That is until I went to his class during lunch time and saw all the crap the kids were eating. Half of the kids just had lunchables. I learned a lot about schools and foods that day and relaxed on the types of foods I sent, while keeping it mostly healthy.

    I have had to talk with a school nutrionist regarding my sons allergies and was basically told that sugary cereals were healthy, but didn't have enough fiber so he would have to supplement his frosted flakes with two graham crackers.

    Point being - do what's in the best interest of you and your kids. It's different for everyone. And typically schools are the worst offenders.
  • brdnw
    brdnw Posts: 565 Member
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    400 calories for a pack of poptarts is certainly trash. I don't know why you'd buy them.
This discussion has been closed.