Teacher says Pop Tarts are not a healthy snack

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  • Tallawah_
    Tallawah_ Posts: 2,475 Member
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    I had a talk with my son yesterday after he came in from school.

    He said he had a good day, and that he doe not like pop tarts anymore and wont bother me for them when we go to the store.

    I told him he can still like them and no one will be mean to him. He says he will think about it.

    Folks, it was never ever about the fight of having a pop tart. It was about not having my child feel bad for eating a food. Now it's happened.

    I just want to say that I'm not going to go against the rules of the snack policy. That was never a thing.

    I just wish the teacher would have sent a note home when she trashed the first pop tart.

    I also wish she wouldn't have had him sitting there watching everyone else eat while his snack had been binned.

    My son and I talked about his not telling me the first time. He said he forgot. He's six by the way.

    I think I'm entitled to teach my children that foods are not unhealthy in balance and moderation.

    I see comments of my being lazy and not a good mother, for even giving my child a sugary snack.
    You are entitled to your opinions, even if it's rude and false.

    I've got work to do on this. Have a good one.

    I accept that you were genuinely concerned about your child but in doing this you attempted to defend your 'right' to tell the teacher what to teach. Some of us just thought that was unfair on the teacher who will be trying to balance multiple interests and assigning a measure of priority to each.

    I agree the teacher should have raised this with you, nor should she have thrown the first one away without offering a substitute. We all make mistakes...

    Comments about you being lazy were patently absurd as were comments about 'reading the riot act' to the teacher.
  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
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    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    So you forgot to answer my question.

    I personally have no problem listening to the advice of experts, especially when the experts would be in virtually unanimous agreement.

    I have not problem if someone want to eat Pop Tarts (I sure as hell am not) but saying Pop Tarts and grapes are the same nutritionally/have the same effect on the body is IIFYM gone horribly wrong.

    Look at the star rating for pop tarts from your own source:
    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/baked-products/5212/2

    Pop Tarts get 1 or 2 stars, the grapes get 3 stars across the board, so according to your source grapes are better.

    Also, the information from your source is for 100 calories of grapes vs 200 calories of Pop Tarts so the nutrient values for the grapes are doubled.

    Sure, go for 200 calories of grapes then. Suddenly the grapes have double the sugar of the pop tart.
  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
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    Tallawah_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    Everybody uses the 'Call to Authority' argument! It's just that we all have our preferred 'Authorities'! :smile:

    Who told you the sugar in PopTarts is the same as the sugar in grapes? :smirk:

    Facts of biology?
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
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    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    So you forgot to answer my question.

    I personally have no problem listening to the advice of experts, especially when the experts would be in virtually unanimous agreement.

    I have not problem if someone want to eat Pop Tarts (I sure as hell am not) but saying Pop Tarts and grapes are the same nutritionally/have the same effect on the body is IIFYM gone horribly wrong.

    Look at the star rating for pop tarts from your own source:
    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/baked-products/5212/2

    Pop Tarts get 1 or 2 stars, the grapes get 3 stars across the board, so according to your source grapes are better.

    Also, the information from your source is for 100 calories of grapes vs 200 calories of Pop Tarts so the nutrient values for the grapes are doubled.

    Sure, go for 200 calories of grapes then. Suddenly the grapes have double the sugar of the pop tart.

    Do some research (oh but that involves listening to experts which apparently yo don't like) about added sugars in foods.
  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
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    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Tallawah_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    Everybody uses the 'Call to Authority' argument! It's just that we all have our preferred 'Authorities'! :smile:

    Who told you the sugar in PopTarts is the same as the sugar in grapes? :smirk:

    Funny thing, his own authority that he linked says grapes are better than Pop Tarts.

    For apparently no particular reason as the nutrient profile is not exactly better. Entirely made out of sugar, basically no fiber or other macronutrients to slow down the absorption. If you're one of the people who argues about insulin spikes and whatnot being bad, grapes are worse in that department already. The poptart has different micronutrients than the grapes, in particular vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and iron in higher amounts, while the grapes got vitamin C, K and copper.
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
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    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Tallawah_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    Everybody uses the 'Call to Authority' argument! It's just that we all have our preferred 'Authorities'! :smile:

    Who told you the sugar in PopTarts is the same as the sugar in grapes? :smirk:

    Funny thing, his own authority that he linked says grapes are better than Pop Tarts.

    For apparently no particular reason as the nutrient profile is not exactly better. Entirely made out of sugar, basically no fiber or other macronutrients to slow down the absorption. If you're one of the people who argues about insulin spikes and whatnot being bad, grapes are worse in that department already. The poptart has different micronutrients than the grapes, in particular vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and iron in higher amounts, while the grapes got vitamin C, K and copper.

    So now you are saying you source sucks?
  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
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    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Tallawah_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    Everybody uses the 'Call to Authority' argument! It's just that we all have our preferred 'Authorities'! :smile:

    Who told you the sugar in PopTarts is the same as the sugar in grapes? :smirk:

    Funny thing, his own authority that he linked says grapes are better than Pop Tarts.

    For apparently no particular reason as the nutrient profile is not exactly better. Entirely made out of sugar, basically no fiber or other macronutrients to slow down the absorption. If you're one of the people who argues about insulin spikes and whatnot being bad, grapes are worse in that department already. The poptart has different micronutrients than the grapes, in particular vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and iron in higher amounts, while the grapes got vitamin C, K and copper.

    So now you are saying you source sucks?

    I'm saying the star rating makes no sense. The nutrition numbers are facts, the star rating opinion.
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    edited January 2017
    Options
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Tallawah_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    Everybody uses the 'Call to Authority' argument! It's just that we all have our preferred 'Authorities'! :smile:

    Who told you the sugar in PopTarts is the same as the sugar in grapes? :smirk:

    Funny thing, his own authority that he linked says grapes are better than Pop Tarts.

    For apparently no particular reason as the nutrient profile is not exactly better. Entirely made out of sugar, basically no fiber or other macronutrients to slow down the absorption. If you're one of the people who argues about insulin spikes and whatnot being bad, grapes are worse in that department already. The poptart has different micronutrients than the grapes, in particular vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and iron in higher amounts, while the grapes got vitamin C, K and copper.

    So now you are saying you source sucks?

    I'm saying the star rating makes no sense. The nutrition numbers are facts, the star rating opinion.

    My final comment. While a pop tart is an okay occasional thing, nobody with any sense will favor it over grapes as a snack.

    With the exception of an odd medical condition
  • Tallawah_
    Tallawah_ Posts: 2,475 Member
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    Tallawah_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    Everybody uses the 'Call to Authority' argument! It's just that we all have our preferred 'Authorities'! :smile:

    Who told you the sugar in PopTarts is the same as the sugar in grapes? :smirk:

    Facts of biology?

    LOL!!! You were just born knowing that were you? Nobody told you?
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    Options
    Tallawah_ wrote: »
    Tallawah_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.

    Everybody uses the 'Call to Authority' argument! It's just that we all have our preferred 'Authorities'! :smile:

    Who told you the sugar in PopTarts is the same as the sugar in grapes? :smirk:

    Facts of biology?

    LOL!!! You were just born knowing that were you? Nobody told you?

    Must be the case since anyone trained in nutrition would not say grapes and pop tarts equally good as a snack option.
  • Sweets1954
    Sweets1954 Posts: 506 Member
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    This is a result of Michelle Obama's "healthy lunch" kick. She dictated what is healthy or not healthy. She has vilified many of the foods that children favor and what has been put into place is, often times, not much better. I have seen schools serving the highly sugared cereal flavored yogurts and "granola" bars that contain as much or more sugar than a poptart or doughnut. If they were truly worried about serving healthy foods it would be fresh fruits and veggies instead of the process and canned stuff I usually see!
  • Espresso345
    Espresso345 Posts: 42 Member
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    Pop Tarts AREN'T a healthy food, but I am a little concerned about the teacher being the food police.

    I'm an adult - when I eat a pop tart from the work vending machine, I am usually in a F*@k-it foul mood, and I'm going to regret eating it later. But he's a KID. It won't kill him to have an occasional pop tart and I'm with Mom that granola bars aren't that much better - have you READ the list of ingredients? I think Mom SHOULD have a talk with the principal because food shaming isn't helpful for anyone - and could contribute to eating disorders down the road.

    There are LOTS of things I ate and enjoyed with enthusiasm as a child that I don't eat NOW for health reasons - a pop tart here and there doesn't mean he's going to weigh 300 pounds when he's a teenager.
  • Ready2Rock206
    Ready2Rock206 Posts: 9,488 Member
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    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    I have a summer birthday. I never got to have a classroom birthday party. I'm still bitter. My child has a summer birthday too. :(
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    edited January 2017
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    brower47 wrote: »
    cnbbnc wrote: »
    My thought is that the schools don't like sugary snacks because some kids may get hyper. I could be mistaken though.... I don't think it's ok for teacher to be criticizing what kids bring to school.

    I got so pissed when my son was going to camp and they would discuss healthy foods. Kids that brought "healthy" foods got to wear a healthy hat. My son was all upset one day because when the camp counselor saw his lunch he didn't get a hat. Mind you I'm paying this camp good money and they're inspecting my kids lunch!

    To sum it up, I would be aggravated too.

    I keep seeing the "teachers are avoiding hyperactivity" excuse in this thread a lot. Sugar does not cause hyperactivity. It's a strongly held onto old wives tale. Science says that belief is bunk.

    http://www.yalescientific.org/2010/09/mythbusters-does-sugar-really-make-children-hyper/

    Stop blaming bad behavior on sugar. The poor nutrient is unfairly blamed for so much already.

    If you read the article you posted there are also studies saying sugar influences behavior, especially in kids with ADHD. So not real conclusive.

    I buy into the theory that activities associated with sweets like birthday parties increase hyperactivity.

  • crzycatlady1
    crzycatlady1 Posts: 1,930 Member
    Options
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    I have a summer birthday. I never got to have a classroom birthday party. I'm still bitter. My child has a summer birthday too. :(

    At my kids old school they did summer birthdays at the end of the school year and parents were expected to provide a birthday treat, just like school year birthday kids were expected to. We just brought in a bag of Dum Dum suckers for my (July) kid and called it good :p
  • brower47
    brower47 Posts: 16,356 Member
    Options
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    cnbbnc wrote: »
    My thought is that the schools don't like sugary snacks because some kids may get hyper. I could be mistaken though.... I don't think it's ok for teacher to be criticizing what kids bring to school.

    I got so pissed when my son was going to camp and they would discuss healthy foods. Kids that brought "healthy" foods got to wear a healthy hat. My son was all upset one day because when the camp counselor saw his lunch he didn't get a hat. Mind you I'm paying this camp good money and they're inspecting my kids lunch!

    To sum it up, I would be aggravated too.

    I keep seeing the "teachers are avoiding hyperactivity" excuse in this thread a lot. Sugar does not cause hyperactivity. It's a strongly held onto old wives tale. Science says that belief is bunk.

    http://www.yalescientific.org/2010/09/mythbusters-does-sugar-really-make-children-hyper/

    Stop blaming bad behavior on sugar. The poor nutrient is unfairly blamed for so much already.

    If you read the article you posted there are also studies saying sugar influences behavior, especially in kids with ADHD.

    I buy into the theory that activities associated with sweets like birthday parties increase hyperactivity.

    I read the article, even the bit about how activities surrounding special food can affect behavior. But that doesn't really apply to this topic. If you chose to stay on topic, you'll recall that they have a snack every day. This isn't special occasion food, it's routine. The sugar content of the snack is not causing hyperactivity, the proposed fear of the teacher for not wanting the kid to eat a sugary food.

    But if you want to help keep the bad information alive, that sugar causes hyperactivity, it won't be hard. It's very hard to kill a lie once it's been repeated enough to be taken as truth.
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    edited January 2017
    Options
    brower47 wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    cnbbnc wrote: »
    My thought is that the schools don't like sugary snacks because some kids may get hyper. I could be mistaken though.... I don't think it's ok for teacher to be criticizing what kids bring to school.

    I got so pissed when my son was going to camp and they would discuss healthy foods. Kids that brought "healthy" foods got to wear a healthy hat. My son was all upset one day because when the camp counselor saw his lunch he didn't get a hat. Mind you I'm paying this camp good money and they're inspecting my kids lunch!

    To sum it up, I would be aggravated too.

    I keep seeing the "teachers are avoiding hyperactivity" excuse in this thread a lot. Sugar does not cause hyperactivity. It's a strongly held onto old wives tale. Science says that belief is bunk.

    http://www.yalescientific.org/2010/09/mythbusters-does-sugar-really-make-children-hyper/

    Stop blaming bad behavior on sugar. The poor nutrient is unfairly blamed for so much already.

    If you read the article you posted there are also studies saying sugar influences behavior, especially in kids with ADHD.

    I buy into the theory that activities associated with sweets like birthday parties increase hyperactivity.

    I read the article, even the bit about how activities surrounding special food can affect behavior. But that doesn't really apply to this topic. If you chose to stay on topic, you'll recall that they have a snack every day. This isn't special occasion food, it's routine. The sugar content of the snack is not causing hyperactivity, the proposed fear of the teacher for not wanting the kid to eat a sugary food.

    But if you want to help keep the bad information alive, that sugar causes hyperactivity, it won't be hard. It's very hard to kill a lie once it's been repeated enough to be taken as truth.


    You apparently missed this part of the article you posted.

    "Nonetheless, other experiments show that sugar may at least influence behavior. Dr. Wesnes conducted a study in which he found that having a large amount of sugar for breakfast led to a severe deterioration of attention span when compared to having no breakfast or eating whole grain cereal. Dr. Tamborlane, also from Yale, reported that children given sugar had higher levels of adrenaline. A possible explanation for this effect is that since sugar is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream, blood sugar rises quickly, which can lead to higher adrenaline levels and thus symptoms similar to those associated with hyperactivity. Furthermore, children with ADHD also tend to have higher levels of insulin."

    Don't think the question is black and white.
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