Teacher says Pop Tarts are not a healthy snack

Options
17810121328

Replies

  • crzycatlady1
    crzycatlady1 Posts: 1,930 Member
    edited January 2017
    Options
    The teacher who told me my son couldn't bring in pretzels and fishy crackers anymore because they weren't 'healthy' was also very overweight. Not really interested in what her definition of 'healthy' was.

    You're delegating the important job of educating your child to her. And you're micromanaging. This is hardly gross incompetence, it's a minor difference of opinion in a somewhat controversial topic; let the teacher do their job. Probably that teacher didn't make up the rules, but it's part of their job to enforce them equally for everybody. You're unfairly putting them in a difficult position if you pick a fight with them as an individual (and disregard what they have to say because you don't like their body) instead of, you know, working with the decision makers to address the policy, or leaving it be.

    I didn't pick a fight with the teacher but yeah, my kids aren't in the traditional school system anymore because of numerous issues we had, the dumb snack policy being the least of them.
  • crzycatlady1
    crzycatlady1 Posts: 1,930 Member
    edited January 2017
    Options
    shor0814 wrote: »
    The teacher who told me my son couldn't bring in pretzels and fishy crackers anymore because they weren't 'healthy' was also very overweight. Not really interested in what her definition of 'healthy' was.

    You're delegating the important job of educating your child to her. And you're micromanaging. This is hardly gross incompetence, it's a minor difference of opinion in a somewhat controversial topic; let the teacher do their job. Probably that teacher didn't make up the rules, but it's part of their job to enforce them equally for everybody. You're unfairly putting them in a difficult position if you pick a fight with them as an individual (and disregard what they have to say because you don't like their body) instead of, you know, working with the decision makers to address the policy, or leaving it be.

    Then let her stick to educating and leave the food choices to the parent.

    Everybody has their own opinion on what "educating" means, they're all different, and yet, we need a policy that applies to everybody. Luckily most students go home to their parents after school, so the parents are the ultimate authority on food choices in the home. But not in the school. If it's really that hard for parents to live with, homeschooling is an alternative; you've heard the saying "if you want something done right, do it yourself."

    Yep, that's why my kids do their schooling at home now :)
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    Options
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    Options
    Are Pop tarts the devil?

    No, but the macro profile isn't great. A pack of 2 is (going from memory) about 400 calories, 72c, 10f, 6p or somewhere thereabouts. I agree the teacher has no business interfering unless they're exceptionally qualified to do so, and even then... That being said, a greek yogurt and some berries would be a better choice but whatever...

    For the record I love poptarts. I just use them as pre-legday fuel.

    It's a kid, and it's a snack. The OP seems like she otherwise feeds her child a well-rounded diet, so I'm sure his macros aren't lacking. If he's getting the proper nutrients and has a snack every now and then that doesn't have perfect macro ratios, I don't see the harm. Especially if the child is active and he's running and playing often.

    You realize most children in the US don't get the recommended amount of physical activity. Only 15% according to the Tufts University study linked below.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160405122618.htm
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,737 Member
    Options
    puttputt24 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??
    It's not the kids.....................it's the LEGAL SYSTEM.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    Not the legal system. It's the parenting. Adolescents are more obese than ever before. Parents are the ones supplying the food. I stand by supporting the teacher. FOLLOW THE RULES.
    Lol, adolescents aren't going to be skinnier by eating one "healthy" snack on break. Nor are they going to get fat from it if they aren't exceeding their calories. If kids are fat and overweight, it's because it's behavior allowed at home.
    And if you read what I responded to, it was about swapping lunches and food rules. It is a legal issue and most schools will have a policy about it. You should read some student handbooks we have here in California (which are pretty stringent).

    http://chms.schoolloop.com/file/1205619913654/1220710266282/3623520024127309292.pdf

    Ironically, students can't have chips or soda at snack time, but they can at lunch (actually sold by the school lunch room).


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,737 Member
    Options
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
    Options
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    My cousins school had what I thought was a really cool way around this. They still celebrated your birthday in class, but instead of bringing cookies or cupcakes, you had to bring something non-edible, like cool looking pencils, or stickers etc. My aunt told me the kids didn't even miss the treat food (let's face it, not everyone can bake lol) and still had fun/looked forward to birthdays in the class room.
  • Strawblackcat
    Strawblackcat Posts: 944 Member
    Options
    elphie754 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    My cousins school had what I thought was a really cool way around this. They still celebrated your birthday in class, but instead of bringing cookies or cupcakes, you had to bring something non-edible, like cool looking pencils, or stickers etc. My aunt told me the kids didn't even miss the treat food (let's face it, not everyone can bake lol) and still had fun/looked forward to birthdays in the class room.

    I was about to say, "Why does someone having a birthday necessitate bringing food into the classroom?" . There's tons of other fun ways to celebrate a birthday. It doesn't always have to be about candy and cake.
  • pebble4321
    pebble4321 Posts: 1,132 Member
    Options
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    Maybe I'm just old.... but I don't recall anyone bringing cake to school on their birthday and we all survived! Birthday parties were after school, and that worked just fine.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
    Options

    pebble4321 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    Maybe I'm just old.... but I don't recall anyone bringing cake to school on their birthday and we all survived! Birthday parties were after school, and that worked just fine.

    Same here, we didn't celebrate kids birthdays in school at all, let a lone bring in cake or treats.

  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 25,274 Member
    edited January 2017
    Options
    Yeah, when I was growing up, no one brought food to school.

    As for poptarts ... the only time I eat them is prior to a long, long, long bicycle ride. They're 200 calories each ... 400 calories for the packet of 2. I don't need those calories unless I'm seriously exercising!!

    For a snack, it would probably be better to go with a 100 cal banana or a 180 cal granola bar or even a cheese sandwich.
  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
    edited January 2017
    Options
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    Maybe I'm just old.... but I don't recall anyone bringing cake to school on their birthday and we all survived! Birthday parties were after school, and that worked just fine.

    Same here, we didn't celebrate kids birthdays in school at all, let a lone bring in cake or treats.
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    Maybe I'm just old.... but I don't recall anyone bringing cake to school on their birthday and we all survived! Birthday parties were after school, and that worked just fine.

    This may be a cultural difference since my SO who immigrated to the US said the same thing. When I was growing up, it wasn't unusual (but not required) for the birthday boy/girl to bring in some sort of home made treat to share with the class (usually cupcakes) although this really only happened in elementary school where you spent the entire day with one teacher. It may also happen in middle and high school, but I went to prep school after 6th grade so not entirely sure. Since prep school is sleepaway, the dorm "mother" or "father" (adult that lived in the building) or your RA was responsible for doing some sort of party in the dorm (in the evenin, after classes were over) if your parents didn't plan somethjng spntjat nonkne felt left out. Mostly, parents came and took theirs kids and a few friends out to dinner or something.
  • comptonelizabeth
    comptonelizabeth Posts: 1,701 Member
    Options
    Maybe I'm missing the point but to me it seems the OP's objection was more about the teacher bringing it up directly with the child and not about the actual pop tart per se.
    At my kids' schools there were rules about what should be included or not included in packed lunches. We were asked not to include sugary or salty snacks (sweets,chocolate bars,crisps etc) This was partly about encouraging healthy eating habits and also because teachers were having to deal with kids who were either hyper or lacking in energy in afternoon classes.
    This seemed perfectly fair and most parents supported it. However I don't agree that it's OK for a teacher to call out an individual child about the contents of their lunch or snack box and make them feel bad about it. Kids don't have any control over what their parents give them to eat at school and I personally think the teacher should have talked to the OP about it,not the child.
    Having said that it's probably not worth making a huge fuss about it - in my experience kids hate it when you do that and that may be why he/she didn't tell you what had happened .
  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
    edited January 2017
    Options
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    There is 16 g of sugar in a cherry poptart. And 4.5 g sugar per oz of grapes. So 1 poptart is equal to not quit 4 oz of grapes. That's like what 10-15 grapes if even that many. Sure grapes have other vitamins but still both can be in a good diet. Besides sugar is sugar doesn't matter if you get it from a soda or fruit it all becomes the same thing.

    Some nutrition study is needed if you're saying 4 oz of grapes are the same quality snack as a pop tart

    Same amount of sugar, different micronutrients, neither being particularly outstanding.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1920/2

    Ask 100 registered dietitians their recommendation for a snack and I would be willing to bet 95%+ of them would pick the grapes over Pop Tarts.

    So you don't care about the actual nutrient contained but rather go for the "duh, of course grapes are healthy"?

    Which do you think dietitians would pick as the better snack choice?

    Instead of using the old Call to authority fallacy, try to think about WHY you think they'd pick grapes as a better snack choice and why you think they're a better snack choice. I outlined the nutrients in both to you as to why neither is particularly outstanding nutritionally, they're about equal if you compare them, so it certainly isn't because they're so much better nutritionally.
  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
    Options
    elphie754 wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    Maybe I'm just old.... but I don't recall anyone bringing cake to school on their birthday and we all survived! Birthday parties were after school, and that worked just fine.

    Same here, we didn't celebrate kids birthdays in school at all, let a lone bring in cake or treats.
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
    Due to issues like this though, kids can't really celebrate things like their birthdays with classmates with cake or cupcakes. It's forbidden during school time. After school is a different story.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    Maybe I'm just old.... but I don't recall anyone bringing cake to school on their birthday and we all survived! Birthday parties were after school, and that worked just fine.

    This may be a cultural difference since my SO who immigrated to the US said the same thing. When I was growing up, it wasn't unusual (but not required) for the birthday boy/girl to bring in some sort of home made treat to share with the class (usually cupcakes) although this really only happened in elementary school where you spent the entire day with one teacher. It may also happen in middle and high school, but I went to prep school after 6th grade so not entirely sure. Since prep school is sleepaway, the dorm "mother" or "father" (adult that lived in the building) or your RA was responsible for doing some sort of party in the dorm (in the evenin, after classes were over) if your parents didn't plan somethjng spntjat nonkne felt left out. Mostly, parents came and took theirs kids and a few friends out to dinner or something.

    We did that too in Elementary school in Germany.
  • pebble4321
    pebble4321 Posts: 1,132 Member
    Options
    @elphie754
    Yes it could be cultural or age related, or both, I went to primary school in Australia in the 70s.
This discussion has been closed.