Teacher says Pop Tarts are not a healthy snack

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  • stevencloser
    stevencloser Posts: 8,911 Member
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    To OP: I'm gonna throw this out there (I was an elementary school teacher); if you dig your heels in about this issue this early, you will be known as Pop Tart Mom for the remaining years your child(ern) are at that school. Are Pop Tarts really that important? Is being "right" really that important?

    Just send in some raisins...those have carbs, are sweet, and were once a legit fruit.

    And might be less filling for the same calories than the poptart. But because it's "natural" it gets a free pass.
  • shor0814
    shor0814 Posts: 559 Member
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    To OP: I'm gonna throw this out there (I was an elementary school teacher); if you dig your heels in about this issue this early, you will be known as Pop Tart Mom for the remaining years your child(ern) are at that school. Are Pop Tarts really that important? Is being "right" really that important?

    Just send in some raisins...those have carbs, are sweet, and were once a legit fruit.

    I admire a parent taking charge of her parental rights. Why should the parent back down instead of the teacher?

    Unless there is a rule about healthy snacks that has been approved through the school district's normal rulemaking process the teacher needs to back off and respect the parent's wishes. She also needs to leave the child and other students out of it.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,753 Member
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    cnbbnc wrote: »
    My thought is that the schools don't like sugary snacks because some kids may get hyper. I could be mistaken though.... I don't think it's ok for teacher to be criticizing what kids bring to school.
    As a yard duty at my DD's school, THIS would be a legit reason. Some of these kids eat candy throughout the day and get pretty hyper and uncontrollable.
    I got so pissed when my son was going to camp and they would discuss healthy foods. Kids that brought "healthy" foods got to wear a healthy hat. My son was all upset one day because when the camp counselor saw his lunch he didn't get a hat. Mind you I'm paying this camp good money and they're inspecting my kids lunch!

    To sum it up, I would be aggravated too.
    Lol, I see lots of kids with so called "healthy" lunches and physically they can't even run the mile in PE.


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  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,753 Member
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    If a school doesn't want certain foods brought to school, there's usually an agreement/waiver that parents have to sign and the foods are usually listed. Kids at my daughter's school isn't even supposed to be shared because there might be an allergic reaction to the food that the child might not be aware of.
    As a parent, it's then responsible to abide by them.

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  • Peaslepuff
    Peaslepuff Posts: 84 Member
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    OMG - Pop Tarts are NOT healthy foods - and kudos to the teacher for trying to educate their students, and parents. Granola bars are just as bad... what's wrong with carrots, apples, grapes, and celery sticks? Seriously people!

    Personally, I think that if you completely deprive kids, they're not going to know how to eat these things in moderation. Mommy won't be there to dictate her child's food forever.

    In moderation, I think a Pop Tart is fine. It's not an indication of bad parenting, and if the school has specific guidelines on what food is and isn't allowed, that should be written somewhere, preferably online, and the teacher should have referenced that to the parent. Otherwise, it's not the teacher's business.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,049 Member
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    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,753 Member
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    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??
    It's not the kids.....................it's the LEGAL SYSTEM.


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  • jnananamaste
    jnananamaste Posts: 72 Member
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    My kid's school did a lesson early on in the year where they sorted foods into sometimes and frequent foods. I liked that. It didn't demonize any foods, but reinforced that a banana usually provides more nutritional benefits than a cookie or piece of candy, without saying to not ever eat those things. It also highlighted the benefits of having a larger % of your diet made up of nutritious foods. They encourage more nutritious snacks/lunches (I don't think candy is allowed in snacks/lunches), but at holiday parties there are cakes/cookies. Teachers gave out candy canes in the kid's Christmas treat bags. They do a trunk or treat (outside of school hours) at Halloween. Balance. I like it.

    PS It's a private school.
    PPS I didn't read every single comment so I apologize if this is redundant.
  • singingflutelady
    singingflutelady Posts: 8,736 Member
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    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?
  • puttputt24
    puttputt24 Posts: 30 Member
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    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Aaah gone are the days when kids swapped lunches and snacks, there were no food rules and allergies/sicknesses/intolerance's were rarely heard of. Wtf has happened to our kids since i was in school??
    It's not the kids.....................it's the LEGAL SYSTEM.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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    Not the legal system. It's the parenting. Adolescents are more obese than ever before. Parents are the ones supplying the food. I stand by supporting the teacher. FOLLOW THE RULES.
  • pebble4321
    pebble4321 Posts: 1,132 Member
    edited January 2017
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    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    This is where I would expect a good teacher would set the expectations in class - everyone is having something that is healthy or good for them. Clearly accomodations need to be made for students with actual allergies or medical needs, as you describe, and it should certainly be done in a way that doesn't make the child feel bad. I still think it's a good idea to promote healthy eating in general for the sake of the kids who aren't getting that message at home. (To me, healthy eating includes the idea that some people have a different set of foods that are good for them.)
  • elphie754
    elphie754 Posts: 7,574 Member
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    I know that I said this earlier but limiting snacks to only vegetables, fruits, yogurt, and granola leaves some students with NOTHING they can eat for snack because of medical reasons. So what happens to them? They starve or they get an exception and get bullied/made to feel guilty because what the teacher randomly decided was healthy isn't healthy for them?

    100% this.
    danipals1 wrote: »
    When I read the title of the post I thought for sure that this was going to be different than what it was. Follow the school rules! We wonder what is wrong with kids these days when parents are setting the example to not follow the rules. The teacher is obviously correct in her statement that Pop Tarts are not healthy. She did not say bad..she said not healthy which s a fact. That doesn't mean that some things such as granola bars are any healthier but the fact remains that that. Pop Tarts are not healthy! I admire them for trying to encourage kids to make healthier habits. I also agree that if you know your child is uncomfortable bringing the pop tart after the teacher has asked you not to that it is your fault for not sending an alternative snack and causing your child discomfort. We don't always get what we want and we need to set a better example for our kids.

    I wonder if maybe you stopped and let your mind cool off for a day or so if you would still be so upset over a Pop Tart. I have a feeling you might wish you didn't spend so much time and energy on a toaster pastry. Maybe instead send it something that will fuel your child through their learning.

    Yeah... no. First off she even said there wasno specific rule banning pop tarts, just a teacher who is pushing her views on what is healthy and not healthy. No rule was broken.

    Not the case here, but what if the family was poor and can't afford to send their kids with fruits and veggies everyday, but can afford to send them with crackers or gold fish or something else the teacher didn't think was happen? The child be sent with no snack at all?
    danipals1 wrote: »
    I also find it ludicrous that people think that someone should *have their head on a silver platter* or that one would suggest trying to get them fired and lose the ability to support their family for saying a Pop Tart isn't healthy. Feed your kid whatever you want at home and follow the rules at school.
    danipals1 wrote: »
    I also find it ludicrous that people think that someone should *have their head on a silver platter* or that one would suggest trying to get them fired and lose the ability to support their family for saying a Pop Tart isn't healthy. Feed your kid whatever you want at home and follow the rules at school.

    Except there was no specific rule. Just one teacher who decided to say something. If a teacher says anything to my child about not eating what I packed them, especially since there are allergy issues, there I going to be a huge problem.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 10,037 Member
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    I nearly burned down the office toasting my breakfast PopTarts

    Hmmm...You're not the same person who posted about setting her leg on fire making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, are you?
  • sunfastrose
    sunfastrose Posts: 543 Member
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    danipals1 wrote: »
    When I read the title of the post I thought for sure that this was going to be different than what it was. Follow the school rules! We wonder what is wrong with kids these days when parents are setting the example to not follow the rules. The teacher is obviously correct in her statement that Pop Tarts are not healthy. She did not say bad..she said not healthy which s a fact. That doesn't mean that some things such as granola bars are any healthier but the fact remains that that. Pop Tarts are not healthy! I admire them for trying to encourage kids to make healthier habits. I also agree that if you know your child is uncomfortable bringing the pop tart after the teacher has asked you not to that it is your fault for not sending an alternative snack and causing your child discomfort. We don't always get what we want and we need to set a better example for our kids.

    I wonder if maybe you stopped and let your mind cool off for a day or so if you would still be so upset over a Pop Tart. I have a feeling you might wish you didn't spend so much time and energy on a toaster pastry. Maybe instead send it something that will fuel your child through their learning.

    Did you read the part where the OP stated that 1. The only published and shared rules are no peanuts and no seafood and 2. She did not know until the second time she sent a Pop tart?
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