Teacher says Pop Tarts are not a healthy snack

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  • puttputt24
    puttputt24 Posts: 30 Member
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    I went to my kids school this morning, to speak with his first grade teacher.
    He came home yesterday saying he couldn"t bring his Pop tart for their morning snack, because they can only have "healthy snacks".

    I was upset. I still am even after speaking with the teacher this morning.
    I teach my child that there are no good or bad foods, unless you have a allergy or ethically cant eat it.

    He has been sitting there afraid to pull out his "unhealthy snack" because its not "fruit, or granola bar, or yogurt"(healthy snacks").
    I often send those as well.

    I told her not to teach my child about foods being good or bad, because I dont subscribe to that.

    Teacher: "So you're ok with him having a sugary Pop Tart in the morning"?
    Me: Yes, I if send it its good enough for him to have. Just so you know there are granola bars with just as much or more sugar in them as Pop Tarts.
    Teacher: blank stare.

    Do teachers have the right to teach children sugary snacks are unhealthy?

    Are Pop tarts the devil?

    How can you be ok with teaching your child bad habits? Teaching them at a young age to eat unhealthy transitions them to eat bad later on in life. The teacher is doing through right thing and educating your child to a healthier lifestyle.
  • puttputt24
    puttputt24 Posts: 30 Member
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    ninerbuff wrote: »
    OMG - Pop Tarts are NOT healthy foods - and kudos to the teacher for trying to educate their students, and parents. Granola bars are just as bad... what's wrong with carrots, apples, grapes, and celery sticks? Seriously people!
    Define healthy. If a child is getting in all the nutrients they need throughout the day, then why would a Pop tart be unhealthy? You don't get "extra credit" for eating "healthy" once your daily macros/micros are met.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    You have 30 years of nutrition and trying to argue that pop tarts are ok to eat?? Sure they are ok to eat but they are no means healthy. Smh
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,575 Member
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    brower47 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    I think I'm more disturbed by the fact that he's been sitting there hungry and afraid to be judged for not eating healthy food.

    Who wants their child to be afraid to eat and go hungry? This is how food disorders begin.

    But if he took something within the rules he wouldn't be afraid or hungry, correct? It seems like you are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it.

    Whenever I encounter something I believe is an injustice, I like to stick my head in the sand in order to prevent creating any waves too.

    Injustice? ::laugh::

    What was your question? Are you unsure of the definition of the word?

    Here you go:

    An unjust or unfair act; wrong.

    Yep. A teacher asking a child to follow rules does not fit that description.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,575 Member
    edited January 2017
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    double post
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,575 Member
    edited January 2017
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    puttputt24 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    OMG - Pop Tarts are NOT healthy foods - and kudos to the teacher for trying to educate their students, and parents. Granola bars are just as bad... what's wrong with carrots, apples, grapes, and celery sticks? Seriously people!
    Define healthy. If a child is getting in all the nutrients they need throughout the day, then why would a Pop tart be unhealthy? You don't get "extra credit" for eating "healthy" once your daily macros/micros are met.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    You have 30 years of nutrition and trying to argue that pop tarts are ok to eat?? Sure they are ok to eat but they are no means healthy. Smh

    I think the point trying to be made is that just because pop-tarts are not "healthy" doesn't make them unhealthy when they are a small part of an overall healthy diet.
  • AngInCanada
    AngInCanada Posts: 947 Member
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    glassyo wrote: »
    Nope. Not okay. That teacher with one day has just undone your years of hard work in trying to teach your kid that there are no good or bad foods. Kids are like sponges and they take everything personally, he's not going to see that the teacher was being a not-nice person, he's going to see that he has bad food. And it's going to take a lot of consistent effort on your part and on his (when he figures it out for himself) that foods don't get labels like that unless - you're right - they're medically or ethically unsound FOR EACH INDIVIDUAL. (I'm all het up over this. Sorry.) If I were you I would have gone immediately to the principal because shenanigans.

    Also, did they send you out a guideline at the beginning of the school year as to what constitutes a healthy or unhealthy snack? Is it in writing that the kids can only have fruit/yogurt/granola?

    Sounds to me like teacher just didn't want to deal with your child on a sugar high, which if I were the parent would be unacceptable. You don't tell my kid what's good or bad when it comes to food, I do.

    They need to provide that guideline for all parents in writing or they need to stfu.

    (not that I'm mad about this at all... :# )

    Do you need a pop tart? :)

    Maybe a snickers ;)
  • shor0814
    shor0814 Posts: 559 Member
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    brower47 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    I think I'm more disturbed by the fact that he's been sitting there hungry and afraid to be judged for not eating healthy food.

    Who wants their child to be afraid to eat and go hungry? This is how food disorders begin.

    But if he took something within the rules he wouldn't be afraid or hungry, correct? It seems like you are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it.

    Whenever I encounter something I believe is an injustice, I like to stick my head in the sand in order to prevent creating any waves too.

    Injustice? ::laugh::

    What was your question? Are you unsure of the definition of the word?

    Here you go:

    An unjust or unfair act; wrong.

    Yep. A teacher asking a child to follow rules does not fit that description.

    From the OP's previous posts it seems that "healthy" is not actually part of the rules. I believe the restrictions were nuts and seafood (really? seafood? Or did they really mean shellfish and not know the difference).
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
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    shor0814 wrote: »
    The teacher who told me my son couldn't bring in pretzels and fishy crackers anymore because they weren't 'healthy' was also very overweight. Not really interested in what her definition of 'healthy' was.

    You're delegating the important job of educating your child to her. And you're micromanaging. This is hardly gross incompetence, it's a minor difference of opinion in a somewhat controversial topic; let the teacher do their job. Probably that teacher didn't make up the rules, but it's part of their job to enforce them equally for everybody. You're unfairly putting them in a difficult position if you pick a fight with them as an individual (and disregard what they have to say because you don't like their body) instead of, you know, working with the decision makers to address the policy, or leaving it be.

    Then let her stick to educating and leave the food choices to the parent.

    Everybody has their own opinion on what "educating" means, they're all different, and yet, we need a policy that applies to everybody. Luckily most students go home to their parents after school, so the parents are the ultimate authority on food choices in the home. But not in the school. If it's really that hard for parents to live with, homeschooling is an alternative; you've heard the saying "if you want something done right, do it yourself."
  • Chunkahlunkah
    Chunkahlunkah Posts: 373 Member
    edited January 2017
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    Back when I was a kid in the late 80s, my school also had a "healthy snack" policy. This must vary by district and state since many here seem to have not been exposed to this before.

    Schools call it a "healthy snack" not a "healthy diet." Of course a healthy diet has room for processed, low nutrient foods like pop tarts. That's not what a "healthy snack" policy refutes.

    Little kids can be very sensitive to reprimands from authority figures. I personally think the teacher was an idiot for saying something directly to the boy, since from his pov that could easily feel like he was in trouble for breaking a rule. I think she should've instead sent a letter home for the parent or called. My two cents.
  • shor0814
    shor0814 Posts: 559 Member
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    shor0814 wrote: »
    The teacher who told me my son couldn't bring in pretzels and fishy crackers anymore because they weren't 'healthy' was also very overweight. Not really interested in what her definition of 'healthy' was.

    You're delegating the important job of educating your child to her. And you're micromanaging. This is hardly gross incompetence, it's a minor difference of opinion in a somewhat controversial topic; let the teacher do their job. Probably that teacher didn't make up the rules, but it's part of their job to enforce them equally for everybody. You're unfairly putting them in a difficult position if you pick a fight with them as an individual (and disregard what they have to say because you don't like their body) instead of, you know, working with the decision makers to address the policy, or leaving it be.

    Then let her stick to educating and leave the food choices to the parent.

    Everybody has their own opinion on what "educating" means, they're all different, and yet, we need a policy that applies to everybody. Luckily most students go home to their parents after school, so the parents are the ultimate authority on food choices in the home. But not in the school. If it's really that hard for parents to live with, homeschooling is an alternative; you've heard the saying "if you want something done right, do it yourself."

    Read my post above, which rules are we talking about? I see no mention of specific rules regarding "healthy" snacks as the OP has posted.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,575 Member
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    shor0814 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    brower47 wrote: »
    I think I'm more disturbed by the fact that he's been sitting there hungry and afraid to be judged for not eating healthy food.

    Who wants their child to be afraid to eat and go hungry? This is how food disorders begin.

    But if he took something within the rules he wouldn't be afraid or hungry, correct? It seems like you are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it.

    Whenever I encounter something I believe is an injustice, I like to stick my head in the sand in order to prevent creating any waves too.

    Injustice? ::laugh::

    What was your question? Are you unsure of the definition of the word?

    Here you go:

    An unjust or unfair act; wrong.

    Yep. A teacher asking a child to follow rules does not fit that description.

    From the OP's previous posts it seems that "healthy" is not actually part of the rules. I believe the restrictions were nuts and seafood (really? seafood? Or did they really mean shellfish and not know the difference).

    From the OP: He came home yesterday saying he couldn"t bring his Pop tart for their morning snack, because they can only have "healthy snacks".
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