Teacher says Pop Tarts are not a healthy snack

Options
1356728

Replies

  • joemac1988
    joemac1988 Posts: 1,021 Member
    Options
    Are Pop tarts the devil?

    No, but the macro profile isn't great. A pack of 2 is (going from memory) about 400 calories, 72c, 10f, 6p or somewhere thereabouts. I agree the teacher has no business interfering unless they're exceptionally qualified to do so, and even then... That being said, a greek yogurt and some berries would be a better choice but whatever...

    For the record I love poptarts. I just use them as pre-legday fuel.
  • Alyssa_Is_LosingIt
    Alyssa_Is_LosingIt Posts: 4,696 Member
    Options
    Are Pop tarts the devil?

    No, but the macro profile isn't great. A pack of 2 is (going from memory) about 400 calories, 72c, 10f, 6p or somewhere thereabouts. I agree the teacher has no business interfering unless they're exceptionally qualified to do so, and even then... That being said, a greek yogurt and some berries would be a better choice but whatever...

    For the record I love poptarts. I just use them as pre-legday fuel.

    It's a kid, and it's a snack. The OP seems like she otherwise feeds her child a well-rounded diet, so I'm sure his macros aren't lacking. If he's getting the proper nutrients and has a snack every now and then that doesn't have perfect macro ratios, I don't see the harm. Especially if the child is active and he's running and playing often.
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,502 Member
    Options
    They sent a note saying we had to provide two snacks plus lunch for the child.

    I didnt see anything specifying what was an acceptable healthy snack item. We just cant send nuts, or seafood.

    Then here is how I would handle the conversation you described:

    Teacher: It's against policy to send unhealthy foods like pop tarts.
    You: Show me the policy.
    Teacher: It was sent home at the beginning of the year.
    You: This one? *Pulls out what was sent home at beginning of year.* How exactly do you figure this says no Pop Tarts, unless said Pop Tarts contain nuts or seafood?
    Teacher: *blank stare*

    Look, I don't think Pop Tarts are "healthy" either, but I am willing to acknowledge when that is my opinion and not a verifiable fact.
  • butterfli7o
    butterfli7o Posts: 1,319 Member
    Options
    OMG - Pop Tarts are NOT healthy foods - and kudos to the teacher for trying to educate their students, and parents. Granola bars are just as bad... what's wrong with carrots, apples, grapes, and celery sticks? Seriously people!

    Good luck getting little kids to love celery sticks...yuck.
    I don't believe in demonizing food.
  • deannalfisher
    deannalfisher Posts: 5,600 Member
    Options
    I think I'm more disturbed by the fact that he's been sitting there hungry and afraid to be judged for not eating healthy food.

    Who wants their child to be afraid to eat and go hungry? This is how food disorders begin.

    But if he took something within the rules he wouldn't be afraid or hungry, correct? It seems like you are perpetuating the problem rather than solving it.

    what rules? the OP said the only thing on the policy she saw was nuts and seafood...so unless they provide concrete examples of what is/isn't allowed; and/or a nutrition profile for food (must be less than xg fat or xg of carbs) - then the school doesn't have a leg to stand on

    and FWIW, have you seen the quality of many school lunches? a pop-tart may be the least of the kids issue down the road
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,423 Member
    Options

    Do teachers have the right to teach children sugary snacks are unhealthy?

    Are Pop tarts the devil?

    Schools have a right to set policies about what comes into the school. Sometimes these policies are applied in a dumb way to things like food, scissors, clothing. The teacher means well but probably is like many who believe there are strict lines between healthy and unhealthy foods and everyone needs to be the same. If you disagree strongly with what your child is being taught or a policy you should present your side to the teacher, principal, school board, etc. You may succeed in getting poptarts approved or you may get more foods eliminated from the approved list... maybe they'd set a policy of fresh fruit only. If it is just mildly annoying just ask for an approved snack list, send the approved snacks and tell your kid to enjoy the poptarts at home.

    If you are in the US, homeschooling is legal in all states and a great option for educational/personal freedom. Eat whatever, whenever you want! (My child is homeschooled and I am biased for it for a number of reasons.)

    My personal opinion of pop tarts as a snack is that they are not unhealthy unless you are allergic to the ingredients or have a medical condition. They are not super packed with nutrition but not any more unhealthy for most people than granola bars, yogurts or other popular snack foods. I wouldn't want a poptart but if my dd wants to eat them occasionally that's fine.
  • fattymcrunnerpants
    fattymcrunnerpants Posts: 311 Member
    Options
    Ah the great pop tart debate. My ex and I battle over this practically daily. He feeds them nothing but junk. Pizza, popcorn, pop tarts, cookies, fast food. Bugs the absolute crap out of me because while there's no "bad" foods in the context of a varied diet it means I have to 100% be the "varied" part of their diet. Now let's look at this critically:

    A cherry pop tart JUST ONE has 200 calories, 38 grams of carbohydrates, Less than 1 gram of fiber, 17 grams of sugar, 2 grams of protein and 5 grams of fat. So if your child is getting two pop tarts in a pack... and you know he's going to eat two... That's 400 Calories and 34 grams of sugar, 10 grams of fat, and 4 grams of protein. In a snack.

    Now lets compare that to my children's other favorite snack: Quaker Oats chocolate chip granola bars. 100 Calories, 3 grams of fat, 7 grams of sugar, 2 grams of protein, 1 gram of fiber. And that's just one. Which they only get packaged in one bar/ package anyway.

    So while there are no "good" or "bad" foods there are foods that give you more nutrient bang for your buck. I used to work under the SNAP-Ed grant that tried to educate people on more nutritious foods. The thing of it is, is that the government has a high investment in teaching children to eat nutritious foods. They actually get more funding based on healthy lunch and snack policies. So that's probably where this policy is coming from. Although I don't think it's cool to not let him have it if that's what his parent is packing for him.
  • AliceDark
    AliceDark Posts: 3,886 Member
    Options
    I've heard similar stories from a lot of my friends with elementary school-aged children, and I think it's really inappropriate for children that young to be hearing negative messages about food. Food is an incredibly complicated topic (clearly, judging from these boards) and first-graders really aren't yet equipped to sort through messaging about good vs. bad foods. Some of those poor kids are going to be set up perfectly for disordered eating patterns. Good for you for reinforcing the message that you can eat everything in moderation with your son.

    I would ask to see the policy, and follow it to the letter so that your son doesn't have to personally handle any more food-related confrontations with the teacher. It's really sad that he's already been dealing with so much stress and uncertainty about the foods you give him. I'd also tell the teacher that you'll follow the policy as written, but that any other food-related questions need to be handled directly between the two of you since he's already feeling stress around the subject.
This discussion has been closed.