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You don't use a food scale?

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  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Posts: 26,232Member Member Posts: 26,232Member Member
  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Posts: 26,232Member Member Posts: 26,232Member Member
  • pinuplovepinuplove Posts: 12,930Member Member Posts: 12,930Member Member
  • allieeverydayallieeveryday Posts: 86Member Member Posts: 86Member Member
    I've only had my food scale for a couple of weeks, and I have some questions re: weighing for portion sizes. I tend to make big pots of food for dinner, then box the leftovers up in tupperware for lunches over the next few days. What I've been doing is weighing the pot (so I know weight to subtract later), tare-ing, adding each ingredient individually, writing down the weight and tare-ing between each ingredient. It sounds like that's consistent with what ya'll are doing.

    So if I'm doing a recipe, and it says "8 servings," do I just divide the total weight by 8 and that's the portion size? This is what I did last night for dinner and then weighed out the leftover portions too. Though it weighed different amounts uncooked vs. cooked - which weight is the correct one? How do you determine how many portions if you're improvising a recipe? Am I totally overthinking this?
  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Posts: 26,232Member Member Posts: 26,232Member Member
    I've only had my food scale for a couple of weeks, and I have some questions re: weighing for portion sizes. I tend to make big pots of food for dinner, then box the leftovers up in tupperware for lunches over the next few days. What I've been doing is weighing the pot (so I know weight to subtract later), tare-ing, adding each ingredient individually, writing down the weight and tare-ing between each ingredient. It sounds like that's consistent with what ya'll are doing.

    So if I'm doing a recipe, and it says "8 servings," do I just divide the total weight by 8 and that's the portion size? This is what I did last night for dinner and then weighed out the leftover portions too. Though it weighed different amounts uncooked vs. cooked - which weight is the correct one? How do you determine how many portions if you're improvising a recipe? Am I totally overthinking this?

    Yeah, that's fine. You're eating the whole thing eventually anyway, right? So you're getting all the calories eventually, it may just be a little off from day to day. No big.
  • try2againtry2again Posts: 3,490Member Member Posts: 3,490Member Member
    I've only had my food scale for a couple of weeks, and I have some questions re: weighing for portion sizes. I tend to make big pots of food for dinner, then box the leftovers up in tupperware for lunches over the next few days. What I've been doing is weighing the pot (so I know weight to subtract later), tare-ing, adding each ingredient individually, writing down the weight and tare-ing between each ingredient. It sounds like that's consistent with what ya'll are doing.

    So if I'm doing a recipe, and it says "8 servings," do I just divide the total weight by 8 and that's the portion size? This is what I did last night for dinner and then weighed out the leftover portions too. Though it weighed different amounts uncooked vs. cooked - which weight is the correct one? How do you determine how many portions if you're improvising a recipe? Am I totally overthinking this?

    For correct serving weight, use the finished product weight. When it's my own creation, I just visually determine about how many servings it should be. It doesn't really matter what you call the serving sizes. If a serving size is 100 g, and I have 125 g, I just log 1.25 servings. Others, rather than use portion sizes, call 1 g a serving and simply log the number of grams they eat.
  • allieeverydayallieeveryday Posts: 86Member Member Posts: 86Member Member
    Yeah, that's fine. You're eating the whole thing eventually anyway, right? So you're getting all the calories eventually, it may just be a little off from day to day. No big.

    No, it's usually split between two of us. Husband doesn't weigh, so I'm just weighing leftovers and my portion.

  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Posts: 26,232Member Member Posts: 26,232Member Member
    Yeah, that's fine. You're eating the whole thing eventually anyway, right? So you're getting all the calories eventually, it may just be a little off from day to day. No big.

    No, it's usually split between two of us. Husband doesn't weigh, so I'm just weighing leftovers and my portion.

    Are you creating recipes in the Recipe section of your food diary, and assigning serving sizes? I assumed you were.
  • Crafty_camper123Crafty_camper123 Posts: 1,436Member Member Posts: 1,436Member Member
    I've only had my food scale for a couple of weeks, and I have some questions re: weighing for portion sizes. I tend to make big pots of food for dinner, then box the leftovers up in tupperware for lunches over the next few days. What I've been doing is weighing the pot (so I know weight to subtract later), tare-ing, adding each ingredient individually, writing down the weight and tare-ing between each ingredient. It sounds like that's consistent with what ya'll are doing.

    So if I'm doing a recipe, and it says "8 servings," do I just divide the total weight by 8 and that's the portion size? This is what I did last night for dinner and then weighed out the leftover portions too. Though it weighed different amounts uncooked vs. cooked - which weight is the correct one? How do you determine how many portions if you're improvising a recipe? Am I totally overthinking this?

    I usually weigh my ingredients seperately and as I put them into the recipe builder. (Weigh my meat, put in pan. Weigh my pasta, put in pan, etc) I also keep a note of my pot/pan or what have you. At the end, I weigh the whole thing, and subtract the weight of the pot. I use the final cooked weight as my number of servings. (Example: 1579kg = 1579 "servings") When I plate my serving, I put the weight in grams as my number of servings. ( I served myself 300g =300 "servings"). I feel like it's less math this way. The trick is remembering to note the weight of my pot before hand. (I always seem to forget, lol).
  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Posts: 26,232Member Member Posts: 26,232Member Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Yeah, that's fine. You're eating the whole thing eventually anyway, right? So you're getting all the calories eventually, it may just be a little off from day to day. No big.

    No, it's usually split between two of us. Husband doesn't weigh, so I'm just weighing leftovers and my portion.

    In this case, what I would do is weight the finished product, and enter that number as your total number of servings. Then when you take some leftovers, what ever amount that weighs, you enter that as your serving number for that particular meal. Sometimes what I'll do, is weigh it as I put it into containers and write the weight on the outside of the container using some masking tape, that way I know exactly what's in there without reweighing it.

    Yep, or if it's a Ziploc bag I just write on it with a sharpie.
  • allieeverydayallieeveryday Posts: 86Member Member Posts: 86Member Member
    Are you creating recipes in the Recipe section of your food diary, and assigning serving sizes? I assumed you were.

    Yes, exactly. Input everything into Recipe, including servings, and then using that total (and not inputting into the database! ;)
  • try2againtry2again Posts: 3,490Member Member Posts: 3,490Member Member
    I've only had my food scale for a couple of weeks, and I have some questions re: weighing for portion sizes. I tend to make big pots of food for dinner, then box the leftovers up in tupperware for lunches over the next few days. What I've been doing is weighing the pot (so I know weight to subtract later), tare-ing, adding each ingredient individually, writing down the weight and tare-ing between each ingredient. It sounds like that's consistent with what ya'll are doing.

    So if I'm doing a recipe, and it says "8 servings," do I just divide the total weight by 8 and that's the portion size? This is what I did last night for dinner and then weighed out the leftover portions too. Though it weighed different amounts uncooked vs. cooked - which weight is the correct one? How do you determine how many portions if you're improvising a recipe? Am I totally overthinking this?

    The trick is remembering to note the weight of my pot before hand. (I always seem to forget, lol).

    I keep a list of all of the weights of all my pots, pans, & baking pans/dishes on the fridge.
  • estherdragonbatestherdragonbat Posts: 5,222Member Member Posts: 5,222Member Member
    Some people like to weigh the entire thing, enter the number of portions as number of grams (the recipe builder will ask you if you're sure you want X servings if it's over a certain number; like I made a batch of 40 cookies and it asked me if I was sure I meant 40 servings. Just say 'yes'.).

    I do like you do and divide the weight by the number of portions. I've noticed, though, that day-to-day the weight decreases. (So if a just-cooked recipe weighs 800 grams for 8 servings and I take off 100 on Monday and eat it, if I weigh what's left on Tuesday, it might only be 680 grams instead of 700.) Chalk it up to evaporation or something. You can either just keep weighing what's left and dividing by # of servings or store it from the get-go in single-serving containers.

    Uncooked weight is probably going to be more accurate because the cooking process will impact moisture. And while water has no calories, it does have weight. So, let's say you weigh out 200 grams of uncooked rice (one cup). Whether you cook it in 2 cups or 2.25 cups of water (package instructions can vary), the rice will absorb all the water if you let it simmer long enough. But the weights will be different. And sometimes, depending on how quickly you notice that the water's come to a boil, your rice might be cooking in slightly more or less water. (Note this IS majoring in the minors. And extra gram or two of cooked rice doesn't make a significant difference. But accuracy gets more important as you get closer to goal.) Of course, you can still go with the entries for cooked rice in the database and they should be reasonably on-target. Raw's just going to be narrowing the focus.

    For the whole thing, I'd probably go with the 'weigh out each ingredient, weigh the total, enter the gram weight as # of servings, and take what I want.
  • allieeverydayallieeveryday Posts: 86Member Member Posts: 86Member Member
    Thanks ya'll, this is really helpful.
  • try2againtry2again Posts: 3,490Member Member Posts: 3,490Member Member
    Some people like to weigh the entire thing, enter the number of portions as number of grams (the recipe builder will ask you if you're sure you want X servings if it's over a certain number; like I made a batch of 40 cookies and it asked me if I was sure I meant 40 servings. Just say 'yes'.).


    Uncooked weight is probably going to be more accurate because the cooking process will impact moisture. And while water has no calories, it does have weight. So, let's say you weigh out 200 grams of uncooked rice (one cup). Whether you cook it in 2 cups or 2.25 cups of water (package instructions can vary), the rice will absorb all the water if you let it simmer long enough. But the weights will be different. And sometimes, depending on how quickly you notice that the water's come to a boil, your rice might be cooking in slightly more or less water. (Note this IS majoring in the minors. And extra gram or two of cooked rice doesn't make a significant difference. But accuracy gets more important as you get closer to goal.) Of course, you can still go with the entries for cooked rice in the database and they should be reasonably on-target. Raw's just going to be narrowing the focus.

    Maybe I'm not getting your point, but using the uncooked weight to determine the serving size/calories for the cooked dish doesn't make sense.
  • estherdragonbatestherdragonbat Posts: 5,222Member Member Posts: 5,222Member Member
    Not for the cooked dish. For the raw ingredients that go into it.
  • try2againtry2again Posts: 3,490Member Member Posts: 3,490Member Member
    Not for the cooked dish. For the raw ingredients that go into it.

    Ah, yes :) I thought you were saying it would be more accurate to use the uncooked weight when determining serving sizes.
    edited January 2019
  • nutmegoreonutmegoreo Posts: 15,248Member Member Posts: 15,248Member Member
    Not for the cooked dish. For the raw ingredients that go into it.

    Yes! I weight everything raw when adding it into the recipe builder, but then use the cooked weight to determine the number of servings.
  • Crafty_camper123Crafty_camper123 Posts: 1,436Member Member Posts: 1,436Member Member
    I have a question though... Any tips on quickly finding an entry in GRAMS? There are a few foods I have come across that seem to insist I weigh in fluid ounces or milliliters. (For solid foods). I cant remember what food it was, but I scanned the barcode and my options were "1 serving" milliliters, or fluid ounces. I thought: "Okay no big I'll just switch my scale to ML or Fluid ounces and use that". Nope calories were off. Way off. So I looked it up manually. It took 5 minutes of poking at my phone to finally find one that measured in grams. Any faster way of doing this? Whats crazy is the package used grams as its serving! But it was a major PIA to find an entry in grams. Who is out there measuring thier solids in milliliters and fluid ounces?! (I do realize I can just use math and divide my weighed portion into the serving size, but it's nice to just plug the grams I weighed into the diary instead.)
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