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For the love of Produce...

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  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member, Premium Posts: 6,837 Member Member, Premium Posts: 6,837 Member
    I love potato pancakes, although definitely I'd use sour cream or applesauce. (I usually find 0% greek yogurt a nice sub for sour cream, but sour cream is extra delicious and therefore to be employed on holidays in my book.)

    This is a fun article about how a food traditional developed: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2015/12/the-great-latke-lie/420018/
  • o0Firekeeper0oo0Firekeeper0o Member Posts: 219 Member Member Posts: 219 Member
    @mtaratoot Fun tip: I like to mix sour cream and 0% Greek yogurt in about a 50/50 ratio, so you still get the goodness of sour cream and also save a few calories!
    I’m not Jewish but my first boyfriend (over a decade ago) was and his mom introduced me to the wonder of latkes. I may have to make some soon :*
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 18,909 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,909 Member
    @snowflake954, those look sooooo delicious. I love kale chips. It's a character fault, but I fail to have the patience (and attentiveness) to make them, and fresh is The Way. (Good packaged ones are not the worst snack ever, either, but not nearly like fresh-made.)

    Thanks for the vicarious yum!
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Member Posts: 6,178 Member Member Posts: 6,178 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    @snowflake954, those look sooooo delicious. I love kale chips. It's a character fault, but I fail to have the patience (and attentiveness) to make them, and fresh is The Way. (Good packaged ones are not the worst snack ever, either, but not nearly like fresh-made.)

    Thanks for the vicarious yum!

    But Ann--they're so easy.

    De-stem Kale, wash Kale, dry in a cloth towel, put in a large bowl, put on EVOO+salt and spices, massage a few minutes with hands, line an oven pan w parchment paper, arrange Kale loosely on pan, pop in oven at 300° for around 15 min, take out and leave on pan to crisp up.

    Leftovers refrigerate well and you can snack on them for days. I was surprised at how easy it was.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 18,909 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,909 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    @snowflake954, those look sooooo delicious. I love kale chips. It's a character fault, but I fail to have the patience (and attentiveness) to make them, and fresh is The Way. (Good packaged ones are not the worst snack ever, either, but not nearly like fresh-made.)

    Thanks for the vicarious yum!

    But Ann--they're so easy.

    De-stem Kale, wash Kale, dry in a cloth towel, put in a large bowl, put on EVOO+salt and spices, massage a few minutes with hands, line an oven pan w parchment paper, arrange Kale loosely on pan, pop in oven at 300° for around 15 min, take out and leave on pan to crisp up.

    Leftovers refrigerate well and you can snack on them for days. I was surprised at how easy it was.

    I've actually made it. I know. It's just a kind of thing I find tedious, I can't even tell you why. Partly, probably, it's because making a plenty-big lot is several rounds in the oven, even for just me (I can eat *a lot* of kale 😆). There are other things I have this conceptual problem with, like pancakes. My late hubs was the family pancake guy, because he thought the multi-round thing was fine. I don't mind baking cookies (multi-round in oven), because I don't plan on eating > one round in the same session. It's *completely* irrational, I admit.

    But . . . *leftover* homemade kale chips? Yeah, no. 😆
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member, Premium Posts: 5,506 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,506 Member
    That doesn't look bland to me.

    If I hadn't just made a mini batch (just for practice of course) of whole wheat buttermilk biscuits, I'd dig in to something tasty like that!

    This batch came out way better than my first experiment. I changed a few things up. No rolling pin. Hands only. And I folded that dough over and over like a piece of paper about 15 times, then cut them with a sharp knife instead of cutting rounds.

    Good thing it was a small batch.

    Good thing they were less than 100 calories each.

    If I want any more, I have to make another batch. But they do look VERY bland.
    oblvvuxya4bk.jpg

    For a bigger batch, I probably would have cut off the edge so they would have risen more uniformly. Still..... There might be more in my near future.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 18,909 Member Member, Premium Posts: 18,909 Member
    @mtaratoot, I do love a good buttermilk biscuit. Your WW ones look wonderful. I made some (white) for Thanksgiving (solo indulgence, though took one to a friend), using Shirley Corriher's Southern-style recipe from Cookwise, with soft self-rising flour: A different style, but many styles are tasty. In the recipe I used, the dough is so soft and moist it can barely be handled (need to quickly, loosely form them on a floured board), then it goes in a cake-pan, so they won't spread too far. Any of these styles can be good . . . one of either would've been very nice with that soup I made.

    ETA: The Cookwise recipe ones I made looked like this, very different style, no kneading so utterly minimal gluten development (especially because soft wheat):

    y4ic5egqkxbw.jpg

    Both (all reasonable) styles tasty.
    edited December 2020
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member, Premium Posts: 5,506 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,506 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    @mtaratoot, I do love a good buttermilk biscuit. Your WW ones look wonderful. I made some (white) for Thanksgiving (solo indulgence, though took one to a friend), using Shirley Corriher's Southern-style recipe from Cookwise, with soft self-rising flour: A different style, but many styles are tasty. In the recipe I used, the dough is so soft and moist it can barely be handled (need to quickly, loosely form them on a floured board), then it goes in a cake-pan, so they won't spread too far. Any of these styles can be good . . . one of either would've been very nice with that soup I made.

    This recipe hardly could have been easier. I made an experiment with some buttermilk I had left over from cornbread I made on thanksgiving. I rolled them too thin. They were more like savory little whole wheat cookies. I knew I could do better. It's just been a while. The recipe is easily scaleable. For this tiniest batch I took one cup of whole wheat pastry flour, some salt, and some baking powder, then cut in 2 Tbsp butter, then added a half cup buttermilk and mixed minimally. Turned out and patted into a square, then folded in half and patted back out. I kept folding about 15 times or so.... gently... without kneading... then made a little rectangle and cut six small squares. Baked at 425 for 11 minutes.

    They are so easy, I can make more tomorrow. If I had someone else to cook for, I'd make bigger batches.

    They say you can't live on bread alone. So I put some butter on 'em.
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,752 Member Member Posts: 5,752 Member
    Nam Prik Ong is favourite meal for eating lots of crudites. Essentially a warm dip for raw veg. I used 2/3 pork mince with 1/3 quorn. This recipe is particularly easy because it uses a commercial Thai red curry paste instead of curry paste made from scratch.
    https://importfood.com/recipes/recipe/201-spicy-pork-and-tomato-dip-with-veggies-nam-prik-ong
    3civ9o434wox.jpeg
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Member Posts: 6,178 Member Member Posts: 6,178 Member
    I made cardi augratin.907l6z4i3swb.jpg
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Member Posts: 6,178 Member Member Posts: 6,178 Member
    c23lnpamu5v9.jpg
    I saw this bulletin on a store while out walking this morning. It's advertising for a cooperative that has tomatoes gathered by grandfolks. It's hilarious. How many old people can pick tomatoes for hours hunched over in the hot sun? It's backbreaking work done in August.
    edited December 2020
  • o0Firekeeper0oo0Firekeeper0o Member Posts: 219 Member Member Posts: 219 Member
    I saw this bulletin on a store while out walking this morning. It's advertising for a cooperative that has tomatoes gathered by grandfolks. It's hilarious. How many old people can pick tomatoes for hours hunched over in the hot sun? It's backbreaking work done in August.

    And all I can remember is growing up and picking tomatoes with my Nonna, who loved tomatoes so much and was insanely impatient with them; we would always pick them basically still orange because they were “good enough” :D

  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member, Premium Posts: 5,506 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,506 Member
    I made cardi augratin.907l6z4i3swb.jpg

    I am used to calling them cardoon. People grow them around here as ornamental plants. My neighbors have one. Cute little artichoke flowers all over. But you don't eat the flowers, you eat the leaves. I don't recall seeing them in the market. Do they taste much like artichoke?
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Member Posts: 6,178 Member Member Posts: 6,178 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    I made cardi augratin.907l6z4i3swb.jpg

    I am used to calling them cardoon. People grow them around here as ornamental plants. My neighbors have one. Cute little artichoke flowers all over. But you don't eat the flowers, you eat the leaves. I don't recall seeing them in the market. Do they taste much like artichoke?

    We eat the stalks--you need to sort of peel them. They are low-cal, and full of fiber. I don't like artichokes, but love these. They are called "globo" or "gobo cardi" which means "humped", because they are bent over and buried underground to keep them white. The color is a silvery white green. As when cleaning artichokes, you need to put them in water with lemon so they don't turn brown. Cut in about 5" lengths, rinse, and boil for 40 min, drain.

    I found a recipe where you line a pan w parchment paper (I didn't and have a big cleanup--next time I will be more careful), layer in the cardi, pour about half a glass of milk over, salt, pepper, sprinkle Parmigiano and bread crumbs, and then lightly pour a thin stream of EVOO over all. Bake 30 min at 350° or until crusty.

    They also make risotto and soups with them. I love cardi. I ate almost the entire pan by myself.
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