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For the love of Produce...

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  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Member Posts: 9,119 Member Member Posts: 9,119 Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    Have you got a favourite way to prepare carrots that doesn't involve the oven?

    My favourite thing to do is to roast with a glaze of harissa, maple syrup and lemon but now that the weather is warm I don't really want to turn on the oven.

    I sometimes make carrot rapees (=grated carrot salad) or quick asian pickled spiralized carrots. New ideas would be welcome .

    Shred them with apples and drizzle in something acidic and oil. Beautiful and refreshing.
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member Posts: 3,069 Member Member Posts: 3,069 Member
    Shred them into very fine threads. Add lots of cabbage chopped in chunks and some salt, hot chile, garlic, fish sauce, and .... Keep the surface under the liquid and wait a few weeks. Mmmmm.
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 548 Member Member Posts: 548 Member
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    These are a few dishes on a typical day, then the last one is a platter I made for a dinner party
    edited June 30
  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 548 Member Member Posts: 548 Member
    hpyp18bfqf2y.jpg
    jjr24vitu2an.jpg
    hgmys9a5sca6.jpg

    These are njust pictures I found that looked divine and the herbs for health
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 5,399 Member Member Posts: 5,399 Member
    I think carrots are delicious whole or chopped into a salad (or dipped in whatever dip you like -- I think it's a good way to eat baba ghanoush). I'm not particularly into shredding carrots -- dilutes the flavor for me and I don't like the texture as well.
    edited June 30
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,060 Member Member Posts: 5,060 Member
    These might be the last artichokes of the season.
    6391b1oh7j0j.jpeg
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,060 Member Member Posts: 5,060 Member
    Beef lok lak is a national dish of Cambodia. You would have that Cambodian parents invented it to get kids to eat salad, but it was apparently introduced by the Vietnamese. We did our version with chicken breasts tonight. Served with lime and pepper sauce I forgot to bring to the table for the picture. Will use leftover khymer sauce on steaks tomorrow.
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  • VegjoyPVegjoyP Member Posts: 548 Member Member Posts: 548 Member
    VegjoyP wrote: »
    hpyp18bfqf2y.jpg
    jjr24vitu2an.jpg
    hgmys9a5sca6.jpg

    These are njust pictures I found that looked divine and the herbs for health

    UM...just pure curiosity, who disagrees and with what? lol??
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member Posts: 3,069 Member Member Posts: 3,069 Member
    Well, maybe it's boring because it's just more roasted roots, but the red beets and the golden beet were the first ones I pulled out of my garden this year. I ate some of the gold beets that got done before the rest of the batch. I did not grow the purple potato.

    im7v082a8jh1.jpg

    Anybody want to make something from red currants? They are super tart. My friend that always liked to make things from them moved out of state.

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  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,060 Member Member Posts: 5,060 Member
    Steamed artichokes with bearnaise. The step I hate doing with bearnaise is making the vinegar/wine/shallot/tarragon reduction so the last time i did this in quantity seeing as it probably keeps indefinitely in the fridge. Googled artichoke season and apparently it is longer than I thought. So yippee.
    bueda20y8ymb.jpeg

  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,060 Member Member Posts: 5,060 Member
    Nam prik ong is a northeastern Thai meal I make regularly. A great way to eat lots of raw veg. It's a warm dip of pork, red curry paste, garlic, and tomatoes for raw veg.
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  • icemom011icemom011 Member Posts: 895 Member Member Posts: 895 Member
    I've been trying different ways of keeping cilantro in a fresh state. In the past just keeping a bunch in a glass of water worked, but not lately. So my experimenting produced best results when herbs are put in the tupperware container wrapped in paper towels. Honestly, all my greens stored with paper towels lining their bags or tubs, whatever it comes in. It lasts well like that. I buy a lot of produce every week, and i eat a lot of it raw, so keeping it nice, fresh and crispy is very desirable.
  • mtaratootmtaratoot Member Posts: 3,069 Member Member Posts: 3,069 Member
    icemom011 wrote: »
    I've been trying different ways of keeping cilantro in a fresh state. In the past just keeping a bunch in a glass of water worked, but not lately. So my experimenting produced best results when herbs are put in the tupperware container wrapped in paper towels. Honestly, all my greens stored with paper towels lining their bags or tubs, whatever it comes in. It lasts well like that. I buy a lot of produce every week, and i eat a lot of it raw, so keeping it nice, fresh and crispy is very desirable.


    Have you tried produce bags? The ones I've found are made by Zip Loc. They have very tiny pores, not unlike GoreTex, so the produce can sort of "breathe" so the moisture doesn't build up and rot the leaves. I think they recommend washing and drying with towels or paper towels before putting them in the bags. I have a salad spinner and can put clean, spun lettuce and it keeps quite a while. Works for other things, too. I reuse the bags, so one box lasts for YEARS. In fact, I think one bag might last nearly a year.

    I bet if you put a paper towel in one of THOSE bags, you'll really extend the life of your prone-to-rot veggies.

    These aren't the mesh bags you can use when you shop to avoid the thin one-time use plastic bags, but around here you aren't allowed to use those right now. It's all single-use. There are also reusable plastic produce storage bags that allegedly absorb ethylene. They can help keep some fruits from getting overripe.

    And while you're at it, plant a little pot of the stuff in the window for super-fresh herbs!
    edited July 5
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,060 Member Member Posts: 5,060 Member
    icemom011 wrote: »
    I've been trying different ways of keeping cilantro in a fresh state. In the past just keeping a bunch in a glass of water worked, but not lately. So my experimenting produced best results when herbs are put in the tupperware container wrapped in paper towels. Honestly, all my greens stored with paper towels lining their bags or tubs, whatever it comes in. It lasts well like that. I buy a lot of produce every week, and i eat a lot of it raw, so keeping it nice, fresh and crispy is very desirable.

    I normally roll coriander and mint in a small face cloth or tea towel and store in the vegetable drawer. Not sure how optimal this actually is. At any rate it cuts down on single use plastics.
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Member, Premium Posts: 629 Member Member, Premium Posts: 629 Member
    icemom011 wrote: »
    I've been trying different ways of keeping cilantro in a fresh state. In the past just keeping a bunch in a glass of water worked, but not lately. So my experimenting produced best results when herbs are put in the tupperware container wrapped in paper towels. Honestly, all my greens stored with paper towels lining their bags or tubs, whatever it comes in. It lasts well like that. I buy a lot of produce every week, and i eat a lot of it raw, so keeping it nice, fresh and crispy is very desirable.

    Hey @icemom011 I love fresh herbs so - I just bought a few of these herb savers. Love em!! I’ll have to take fridge pics soon - they look like little trees in there lol

    uk0g54buizmn.jpeg
  • icemom011icemom011 Member Posts: 895 Member Member Posts: 895 Member
    icemom011 wrote: »
    I've been trying different ways of keeping cilantro in a fresh state. In the past just keeping a bunch in a glass of water worked, but not lately. So my experimenting produced best results when herbs are put in the tupperware container wrapped in paper towels. Honestly, all my greens stored with paper towels lining their bags or tubs, whatever it comes in. It lasts well like that. I buy a lot of produce every week, and i eat a lot of it raw, so keeping it nice, fresh and crispy is very desirable.

    Hey @icemom011 I love fresh herbs so - I just bought a few of these herb savers. Love em!! I’ll have to take fridge pics soon - they look like little trees in there lol

    uk0g54buizmn.jpeg

    That's really cute, but they need to be refrigerated @Safari_Gal_ ? If so, my fridge is packed for first half of the week, lol, no place for anything.
  • icemom011icemom011 Member Posts: 895 Member Member Posts: 895 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    icemom011 wrote: »
    I've been trying different ways of keeping cilantro in a fresh state. In the past just keeping a bunch in a glass of water worked, but not lately. So my experimenting produced best results when herbs are put in the tupperware container wrapped in paper towels. Honestly, all my greens stored with paper towels lining their bags or tubs, whatever it comes in. It lasts well like that. I buy a lot of produce every week, and i eat a lot of it raw, so keeping it nice, fresh and crispy is very desirable.


    Have you tried produce bags? The ones I've found are made by Zip Loc. They have very tiny pores, not unlike GoreTex, so the produce can sort of "breathe" so the moisture doesn't build up and rot the leaves. I think they recommend washing and drying with towels or paper towels before putting them in the bags. I have a salad spinner and can put clean, spun lettuce and it keeps quite a while. Works for other things, too. I reuse the bags, so one box lasts for YEARS. In fact, I think one bag might last nearly a year.

    I bet if you put a paper towel in one of THOSE bags, you'll really extend the life of your prone-to-rot veggies.

    These aren't the mesh bags you can use when you shop to avoid the thin one-time use plastic bags, but around here you aren't allowed to use those right now. It's all single-use. There are also reusable plastic produce storage bags that allegedly absorb ethylene. They can help keep some fruits from getting overripe.

    And while you're at it, plant a little pot of the stuff in the window for super-fresh herbs!

    Thanks, it's interesting, i will check it out. I reuse my bags too, even the produce single use ones, they last a while actually. Same with ziplock bags. I also have some herbs planted, basil, sage, thyme, rosemary. It's cilantro that won't grow for some reason, idk, maybe it's too hot for it where I live. Hence store bought and needs preservation. Btw, i love your posts about all the things you grow, that's amazing. I want a blueberry bush too, apparently there's a variety that can withstand our weather, i will look into it. In the meantime, we are still in our mango season, so enjoying the delicious sweetness of it.
  • icemom011icemom011 Member Posts: 895 Member Member Posts: 895 Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    icemom011 wrote: »
    I've been trying different ways of keeping cilantro in a fresh state. In the past just keeping a bunch in a glass of water worked, but not lately. So my experimenting produced best results when herbs are put in the tupperware container wrapped in paper towels. Honestly, all my greens stored with paper towels lining their bags or tubs, whatever it comes in. It lasts well like that. I buy a lot of produce every week, and i eat a lot of it raw, so keeping it nice, fresh and crispy is very desirable.

    I normally roll coriander and mint in a small face cloth or tea towel and store in the vegetable drawer. Not sure how optimal this actually is. At any rate it cuts down on single use plastics.

    Thank you, sounds like a good way. I reuse all plastic bags, so I'm not too terrible, i hope. Even single use bags tend to last a while, and ziplock bags last for at least a year.
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