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Ethical food consumption

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  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 21,498Member Member Posts: 21,498Member Member
    jm_1234 wrote: »
    Maybe it's a European thing...

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/aug/21/morrisons-moves-to-end-killing-of-male-calves-at-birth
    It can cost a farmer £2 a day to rear a calf, with selling prices as low as £25–40. In contrast, shooting the calf costs as little as £9, including the bill for disposing of the animal.

    A Guardian investigation last year revealed an estimated 95,000 male dairy calves were being slaughtered on-farm as farmers couldn’t afford to keep them, in a practice known as the dairy industry’s “dirty secret”.

    My family buys male day old dairy calves to raise for meat. We often buy a few at a time and sell to friends as well. Farmers don’t waste or kill for nothing. These articles make it seem as if it is enjoyable. If we don’t take the calves the farmer can sell to other places that slaughter for various uses. Or if he shoots it himself it feeds his dogs for a few days. I see no problem with this. In our own farm if I have picked out a ewe who I feel is too old to breed/who is a poor mother we will butcher her and put the meat in the freezer labeled as dog food.

    Are you arguing that the behavior described in the Guardian article isn't happening at all? Or are you arguing that it is outside your personal experience? Those are two different claims.

    I would argue that just because your family doesn't kill and dispose of calves doesn't mean that it doesn't happen on other farms. When you're talking about larger dairy operations, feeding all the male calves to the dog isn't going to be feasible.
  • nooshi713nooshi713 Posts: 3,919Member Member Posts: 3,919Member Member
    jm_1234 wrote: »
    France to ban culling of unwanted male chicks by end of 2021
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-51301915
    About seven billion male chicks - not wanted for meat or eggs - are killed around the world each year, usually in shredding machines or by gas.

    I thought the above was interesting. I believe a similar practice happens with male dairy cows. It makes me curious, even if I buy step 5 animal welfare milk and eggs, does it mean only the living animals were treated well? Or does it also apply to how they treat the unwanted animals that don't produce dairy and eggs?


    I saw this article. I have seen video footage of chicken and egg farmers throwing male chicks into the grinder alive. This is beyond cruel and why I stopped eating eggs.
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Posts: 493Member Member Posts: 493Member Member
    nooshi713 wrote: »
    jm_1234 wrote: »
    France to ban culling of unwanted male chicks by end of 2021
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-51301915
    About seven billion male chicks - not wanted for meat or eggs - are killed around the world each year, usually in shredding machines or by gas.

    I thought the above was interesting. I believe a similar practice happens with male dairy cows. It makes me curious, even if I buy step 5 animal welfare milk and eggs, does it mean only the living animals were treated well? Or does it also apply to how they treat the unwanted animals that don't produce dairy and eggs?


    I saw this article. I have seen video footage of chicken and egg farmers throwing male chicks into the grinder alive. This is beyond cruel and why I stopped eating eggs.

    What!!!? 😱 This is beyond disturbing! I have to look into this.
    edited January 31
  • steviewonder128steviewonder128 Posts: 4Member Member Posts: 4Member Member
    Your point about the ethics of overconsumption is really important. And it's not just about not eating way more than you need, although that's part of it. But also about limiting food waste and food packaging waste consistently. So here are my best, easy, realistic tips for reigning in consumption, which have the benefit of also saving money a lot of times:

    1. Buy the option was less or more sustainable packaging when possible. Instead of buying the bagged potatoes, pick the loose potatoes. This also lets you control how many you buy. Buying in bulk only saves money if you actually use what you buy.
    2. Bring your own container to the extent possible. Shopping bags, produce bags, containers for bulk items.
    3. If you throw away a lot of food, try meal planning or freezing things to use later if they're about to go bad. The next time you go to make a shopping list, "shop your cupboards" first - try to use what you already have.
    4. Bulk your meals with ingredients that are cheaper and more sustainable. This is also often healthier. Typically includes things like more veggies or more grains.
    5. Save scraps of meats, veggies, and cheese rinds to make the best broth you've ever had.

    These are just the top 5 tips that I've used the most, but I'm sure there are plenty of other great ideas.
  • nooshi713nooshi713 Posts: 3,919Member Member Posts: 3,919Member Member
    nooshi713 wrote: »
    jm_1234 wrote: »
    France to ban culling of unwanted male chicks by end of 2021
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-51301915
    About seven billion male chicks - not wanted for meat or eggs - are killed around the world each year, usually in shredding machines or by gas.

    I thought the above was interesting. I believe a similar practice happens with male dairy cows. It makes me curious, even if I buy step 5 animal welfare milk and eggs, does it mean only the living animals were treated well? Or does it also apply to how they treat the unwanted animals that don't produce dairy and eggs?


    I saw this article. I have seen video footage of chicken and egg farmers throwing male chicks into the grinder alive. This is beyond cruel and why I stopped eating eggs.

    What!!!? 😱 This is beyond disturbing! I have to look into this.


    Yeah it broke my heart. I was buying pasture raised eggs before and while those egg laying hens may have a nice life on an open pasture, what happens to the male chickens? This is what happens. By eating eggs, I was supporting this so I had to stop entirely.
  • jm_1234jm_1234 Posts: 141Member Member Posts: 141Member Member
  • ehrenlynae7ehrenlynae7 Posts: 63Member Member Posts: 63Member Member
    Farmer’s markets are seasonal where I live in the Midwest - only about 6 months out of the year. We shop when they are in season. We buy less meat but buy it strictly from local farmers - only eat meat 2-3x a week.

    We get our milk from a local dairy farm in glass jars, the farm takes the empty jars back, sanitizes and reuses (0 waste). We also get our eggs local and return the empty carton to the farmer for reuse.

    I shop grocery stores I try to stick in season produce. I use reusable shopping bags (including produce bags, and for bulk bins)

    We grow our own tomatoes and I have an indoor herb garden in my kitchen. I’d like to grow more but we have a lot of rabbits in our yard.

    I read somewhere that 40% of the waste in landfills is food waste (not sure if it’s true so don’t quote me on it) so we have started composting and we will use it in our yard and indoor plants.

    In addition to buying sustainable food, we have a goal of eliminating single use plastic in our home in 2020.

    I think it’s unrealistic that the entire world goes vegan but eating less meat and demanding it be from sources other than factory farming is important. I am a firm believer that e vote with how we spend our money.
  • JeromeBarry1JeromeBarry1 Posts: 10,166Member Member Posts: 10,166Member Member
    Ethical is a loaded word. I like loading it with cream cheese and bacon bits.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,176Member Member Posts: 21,176Member Member
    Your point about the ethics of overconsumption is really important. And it's not just about not eating way more than you need, although that's part of it. But also about limiting food waste and food packaging waste consistently. So here are my best, easy, realistic tips for reigning in consumption, which have the benefit of also saving money a lot of times:

    1. Buy the option was less or more sustainable packaging when possible. Instead of buying the bagged potatoes, pick the loose potatoes. This also lets you control how many you buy. Buying in bulk only saves money if you actually use what you buy.
    2. Bring your own container to the extent possible. Shopping bags, produce bags, containers for bulk items.
    3. If you throw away a lot of food, try meal planning or freezing things to use later if they're about to go bad. The next time you go to make a shopping list, "shop your cupboards" first - try to use what you already have.
    4. Bulk your meals with ingredients that are cheaper and more sustainable. This is also often healthier. Typically includes things like more veggies or more grains.
    5. Save scraps of meats, veggies, and cheese rinds to make the best broth you've ever had.

    These are just the top 5 tips that I've used the most, but I'm sure there are plenty of other great ideas.

    6. Save bones in the freezer to make stock (which will be way tastier than store-bought.) I save various sized plastic containers, use these for freezer storage, and save stock in sizes from 1/4 C to 2 C.
    7. Less than a serving size of meat and/or veggies might be nice in scrambled eggs or soup.
    8. Compost! I have a spinning bin in my back yard and some communities compost. At one point, my state subsidized compost bins. That program is over, but apparently many municipalities still have them available and sell them at a discount. I had the Earth Machine where I lived last, but prefer the spinning one as it breaks down MUCH faster and spinning is so much easier than turning. https://www.mass.gov/composting-organics

    My mother and grandfather had a Thing about food waste, and with good planning, what I compost wasn't edible but rather peels and skins and such.
    edited February 16
  • jdhcm2006jdhcm2006 Posts: 2,245Member Member Posts: 2,245Member Member
    My personal opinion is that we need to try as hard as we can but I realize that someone is always going to get the short end of the stick. Whether it’s the animals being slaughtered or the people who can no longer afford their native food bc the demand has skyrocketed the price or the people who are made to pick the crop but aren’t being paid adequately or the bees who are dying due to almond milk production. It’s all very convoluted and everyone should just do their best. But IMO the least everyone can do is recycle and reuse.
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