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Ethical food consumption

daneejeladaneejela Posts: 455Member Member Posts: 455Member Member
I would like to open a discussion about ethical eating, but if possible I would like to extend it beyond vegan vs no vegan debates since it always ends up in a very heated debate with two separate clans.
I think we all can make our eating a bit more ethical and environmental friendly, whatever our views are.

I, personally am not a vegan, nor vegetarian (at least at the moment I am writing this), but I still think that there is a huge difference we can make even while eating meat.

Killing is cruel, but in my views, that kind of cruelty is natural (however I dislike the fact). On the other side, keeping animals in industrial environments, completely separated from anything natural or living is cruel beyond words (IMO).
We are all doomed to die as we are all part of that natural feeding cycle, but even the wildest beasts don't take their prey's life completely.

So, here are my views on ethical eating, and what I try to avoid:

- eating more than I need to be alive and healthy (obviously, I am not very good at this since I am here, but I am striving to find that moderation in everyday consumption of pretty much anything)

- buying meat, eggs, and dairy that are raised in industrial environments - I try to find local free-range farms where those animals are raised close to their natural habitat. Although I hate hunting as a sport, from the meat consumption perspective, I think that's by far the most ethical way to find meat.

- buying veggies that are not grown in a very artificial way with lots of chemistry that kills everything around

- having a lot of food waste - I am trying to learn more recipes, tips & tricks to be able to use most of the food I have available and to have the least waste possible.

- avoiding something just because it's not labeled non-vegan (or any similar label) - for example, many people don't want to use wool for the ethical reasons, and yet, in my country, unused wool is a pretty big environmental problem. Sheep get shaved every summer because it's too hot for them otherwise. A huge amount of wool is being dumped into the environment and is very slow at decomposing. (not food-related example, but I wanted to share)

I am not very good at any of this, and I think I am still doing baby steps, but this is something I would like to incorporate in my habits.

What does ethical eating mean for you? Do you do any daily efforts in order to achieve it?

Do you have any tips or suggestions on how to be better at it?

edited January 8
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Replies

  • jenncornelsenjenncornelsen Posts: 972Member Member Posts: 972Member Member
    Im slowly switching to organic and free range meat, along with more natural cleaners and bodycare products. Its for sure more expensive,especially with a family. But i will continue to switch where i can and hopefully one day I'm switched over 100%
  • imabeevampireimabeevampire Posts: 165Member Member Posts: 165Member Member
    Well done OP for trying to be more ethical.
    Last year I was veggie and making vegan choices where possible.
    I don't drink milk anymore, and since eating meat again, I try and make better choices.
    I don't always make the right choices, and sometimes I'll have a milkshake, but that's life, no one is perfect. Even baby steps help :)
  • liftingbroliftingbro Posts: 2,035Member Member Posts: 2,035Member Member
    liftingbro wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    daneejela wrote: »
    liftingbro wrote: »
    Problem is that there's no way to provide the amount of meat to feed everyone without industrial farms and also have it at a price that is generally affordable.

    Also, if we're talking about fitness, protein requirements are higher than the RDA.

    I am not sure if this is the case...at least not in my part of the world...there are so many abandoned lands that nobody cares for and pasture that is being trimmed with trimming machines. It's almost impossible to see a cow, a pig or a sheep outside in the countryside.

    If all those land would be utilized, I would probably share your opinion, right now it sounds too me like one of those widely spread beliefs that are hard to prove/disprove
    .

    Regarding proteins...I don't have enough knowledge to argue about how much proteins we need, but a look into the historical consumption of proteins raises a question if we maybe are going overboard with proteins lately.
    (I am not talking about bodybuilders, but an average person with average physical activity)

    Are you aware of the land requirements for successful farming/cattle pasturing? Just because land is "abandoned" doesn't mean it can be effectively used for those activities.

    Yes, the land has to have terrain suitable for livestock, have proper grasses for them to eat, and the soil has to have the correct mineral content or the animals will get sick, die or not grow to a reasonable size.

    My understanding is that even when land is well-suited, you're often requiring outside inputs to fully support the animals. It's rarely as simple as "put animals on the land, harvest meat in eighteen or so months."

    Yes, you typically still have to have feed, hay, and sometimes mineral blocks but they can get quite a bit of their nutrition from the land if it has the proper nutrients.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 804Member Member Posts: 804Member Member
    liftingbro wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    daneejela wrote: »
    liftingbro wrote: »
    Problem is that there's no way to provide the amount of meat to feed everyone without industrial farms and also have it at a price that is generally affordable.

    Also, if we're talking about fitness, protein requirements are higher than the RDA.

    I am not sure if this is the case...at least not in my part of the world...there are so many abandoned lands that nobody cares for and pasture that is being trimmed with trimming machines. It's almost impossible to see a cow, a pig or a sheep outside in the countryside.

    If all those land would be utilized, I would probably share your opinion, right now it sounds too me like one of those widely spread beliefs that are hard to prove/disprove
    .

    Regarding proteins...I don't have enough knowledge to argue about how much proteins we need, but a look into the historical consumption of proteins raises a question if we maybe are going overboard with proteins lately.
    (I am not talking about bodybuilders, but an average person with average physical activity)

    Are you aware of the land requirements for successful farming/cattle pasturing? Just because land is "abandoned" doesn't mean it can be effectively used for those activities.

    Yes, the land has to have terrain suitable for livestock, have proper grasses for them to eat, and the soil has to have the correct mineral content or the animals will get sick, die or not grow to a reasonable size.

    Not to mention a water source for cattle and appreciate rainfall amounts for crops.
  • liftingbroliftingbro Posts: 2,035Member Member Posts: 2,035Member Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    liftingbro wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    daneejela wrote: »
    liftingbro wrote: »
    Problem is that there's no way to provide the amount of meat to feed everyone without industrial farms and also have it at a price that is generally affordable.

    Also, if we're talking about fitness, protein requirements are higher than the RDA.

    I am not sure if this is the case...at least not in my part of the world...there are so many abandoned lands that nobody cares for and pasture that is being trimmed with trimming machines. It's almost impossible to see a cow, a pig or a sheep outside in the countryside.

    If all those land would be utilized, I would probably share your opinion, right now it sounds too me like one of those widely spread beliefs that are hard to prove/disprove
    .

    Regarding proteins...I don't have enough knowledge to argue about how much proteins we need, but a look into the historical consumption of proteins raises a question if we maybe are going overboard with proteins lately.
    (I am not talking about bodybuilders, but an average person with average physical activity)

    Are you aware of the land requirements for successful farming/cattle pasturing? Just because land is "abandoned" doesn't mean it can be effectively used for those activities.

    Yes, the land has to have terrain suitable for livestock, have proper grasses for them to eat, and the soil has to have the correct mineral content or the animals will get sick, die or not grow to a reasonable size.

    Not to mention a water source for cattle and appreciate rainfall amounts for crops.

    Yes, there is a reason the Midwest down to Texas in the US produces most of the meat and dairy supply, the land is best suited for cattle, but that's with modern farming. Even less of that land would be suitable for more "sustainable" farming. But the Midwest has great soil, flat land, plenty of lakes/rivers, and moderate rainfall.

    There's a reason the closer you get to the coast the fewer and fewer farms you see.

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