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How does Covid-19 affect Obesity epidemic?

wmd1979wmd1979 Posts: 469Member Member Posts: 469Member Member
So my gym closed due to the pandemic which I pretty much expected, and obviously the first question in my head was what I was going to do to supplement lack of gym time. I have stayed active by playing basketball in the driveway with my daughters, and kickboxing in the basement, however when we are being told to literally "sit on our butts" and people are stocking up with food and other supplies, my first inclination is that others aren't going to be as active. I feel like those who make it a priority to be active will still find ways to do that...however, I feel like those who sometimes struggle to stay motivated can easily find the pandemic as an excuse to literally just "sit on the couch". I'm not judging anyone one way or the other and I don't want to turn this into an excuse to shame people for following directions, but I guess the question that first popped into my head when we were all told to sit on the couch was, is this going to just make us unhealthy in other ways? I know this is a sensitive topic, and I truly hope that each and every one of you stays safe and healthy. Its a crazy time and its having a dramatic affect on a lot of people. To summarize, I know this pandemic is affecting us all in ways that we may not even realize right now. Do you think that it will also negatively affect the obesity epidemic(as I feel it will), or am I not having enough faith in humanity?
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Replies

  • DecadeDuchessDecadeDuchess Posts: 318Member Member Posts: 318Member Member
    Considering that if I was able to outrun my fork I'd not be overweight to begin with, being unable to go to a gym'd then matter. Thereby my weight's only controllable, by nutrition instead of fitness.
    edited March 18
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,509Member Member Posts: 5,509Member Member
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    Considering that if I was able to outrun my fork I'd not be overweight to begin with, being unable to go to a gym'd then matter.

    Your response doesn't really address the point of my post. Of course the fork matters, however, are people going to be less active now because of this pandemic than they were before? The calories being delivered by the fork can stay the same, but if activity level decreases then CO does as well which affects weight.

    [edited by MFP Mods]


    yes of course theoretically we could all adjust our fork to our new activity level - that wasnt really the question though. :*

    It occurs to me that another side effect of isolation, for some people, might be losing motivation for weight loss - especially if their motivation came from group settings as it does for many people.

    Main reason WW is so popular IMO is the social support groups give people.

    [edited by MFP Mods]
    edited March 18
  • fitnessguy266fitnessguy266 Posts: 124Member Member Posts: 124Member Member
    The current epidemic will substantially add to the obesity epidemic unfortunately.......lowered TDEE's for individuals whose only daily activity was their profession (some now remote, others unemployed now unfortunately) plus increased indulgence due to stress and other emotional factors, idle time, etc. I have a bench and squat set at home I am able to take advantage of, plus a nearby school track i am using to walk 4 miles daily.
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 8,660Member Member Posts: 8,660Member Member
    So everything I've heard says that outdoor exercise is considered to be safe. I'm still running and walking outside, but these were habits I had established before. I do think that people who prefer indoor exercise activities may struggle during this time and lots of people are going to be moving a lot less.

    I agree. I can still walk or run to keep my calories out close to normal. But I am fortunate to live in an almost perfect climate in the highlands of southern Mexico. Every morning is sunny and cool right now. The afternoons get hot, high 80s to low 90s. So, I just get out in the morning. But for those in more difficult climates, I can't see how NEAT would not be affected and there wouldn't be some weight gain among some number of people.

    Whether that results in obesity or not is a question. Weight gain maybe? Some that are on the line may push over it into obesity.

    I'm more concerned with my muscle mass and conditioning as that came from weight training and, although I can do some resistance bands and body weight stuff, I'm sure I will detrain somewhat.
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Posts: 22,106Member Member Posts: 22,106Member Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    So everything I've heard says that outdoor exercise is considered to be safe. I'm still running and walking outside, but these were habits I had established before. I do think that people who prefer indoor exercise activities may struggle during this time and lots of people are going to be moving a lot less.

    I agree. I can still walk or run to keep my calories out close to normal. But I am fortunate to live in an almost perfect climate in the highlands of southern Mexico. Every morning is sunny and cool right now. The afternoons get hot, high 80s to low 90s. So, I just get out in the morning. But for those in more difficult climates, I can't see how NEAT would not be affected and there wouldn't be some weight gain among some number of people.

    Whether that results in obesity or not is a question. Weight gain maybe? Some that are on the line may push over it into obesity.

    I'm more concerned with my muscle mass and conditioning as that came from weight training and, although I can do some resistance bands and body weight stuff, I'm sure I will detrain somewhat.

    Yes, since I'm counting calories already and understand how my energy use is tied to my activity, I can pro-actively cut my calories to make sure I'm consuming what I'm needing if I wind up moving less during this period (which I almost certainly will, just because I typically walk to and from work). For an "average" person, if their NEAT suddenly goes down, they're probably not going to automatically start eating less.
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