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Fitness and diet myths that just won't go away

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  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 44,775 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 44,775 Member
    The ones that annoy me the most are "rules" that make no sense...

    -Don't eat any ingredients that you can't pronounce.
    -Only shop the perimeter of the grocery store, not the middle.
    -Don't eat after 7pm.
    -Don't eat white foods.

    So much wrong...

    In the case of the bolded "rule" - the way most grocery stores are laid out, you'll find most of the whole foods around the perimeter of the store and most of the packaged foods in the aisles. I think it's a useful guideline for someone learning or re-learning how to shop for nutritious food, but yeah, there's nothing magic about it otherwise.

    Also re: not eating after 7 PM, they call that intermittent fasting now and it's trendy.

    I do agree with you on the "nothing you can't pronounce" and "nothing white" rules, though. If you just blindly apply the rule without trying to learn anything about what you're doing and why it works (or doesn't), that's the kind of anti-intellectual BS that got all your high school friends hitting you up to join their pyramid scheme and we could do with less of it, as a species.

    I don't know if this is really true though. Yes, at many stores you'll find fresh fruits and vegetables and dairy products around the edge, but you'll also frequently find the bakeries, deli, alcohol (in places that sell it), and ice cream. And you'll most often find things like legumes, oats, and dried herbs and spices in the middle aisles. I think it's more accurate to say that you'll often find temperature controlled items along the edges and shelf stable stuff in the middle. There is a good amount of overlap between temperature controlled and nutrient-dense, but I honestly think the average person would be better served by just learning how to identify foods that meet their nutritional goals ANYWHERE in the store instead of just avoiding certain aisles or assuming something is okay because it's along the edges. If I'm personally planning dinner, I'd rather have a bag of lentils or some canned tomatoes over some Go-Gurt.
    Was gonna say that too. On one side of the store I shop is all the fruits and vegetables. On the opposite side is the bakery, deli and alcohol.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • tariqaritariqari Member Posts: 38 Member Member Posts: 38 Member
    Staying hydrated assists in balancing the calorie deficit. It’s essential, not a myth, backed by science and any M.D. you can find.
    edited March 3
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 2,137 Member Member Posts: 2,137 Member
    The ones that annoy me the most are "rules" that make no sense...

    -Don't eat any ingredients that you can't pronounce.
    -Only shop the perimeter of the grocery store, not the middle.
    -Don't eat after 7pm.
    -Don't eat white foods.

    So much wrong...

    Didn't you see Gremlins??!?

    Yes, that's why I'm careful about hydration, too ;)
  • ninerbuffninerbuff Member, Greeter Posts: 44,775 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 44,775 Member
    I was actually thinking about this thread yesterday and I'm not sure if what I'm going to say exactly fits the topic, but the first "myth" I thought of was:

    People who are overweight don't know it and need a thin person to tell them.

    (I'm not saying there's not ignorance at work, but in my experience overweight people are typically painfully aware they are overweight, and it can be incredibly hurtful to have people make assumptions about you and just start in on giving you advice, rather than ask where you are and what specifically you might want help with, or even if you want advice at all. Especially when the person assuming is a medical professional.)

    That said, since spending time on the forums I have learned several things! One example: I am now using my food scale to more accurately log my food! So I can learn and am very willing! But my learning it will not mean that overnight I will stop being overweight. As we all know, it can be a long process, with restarts as we learn more and adjust. If you meet me 20 lbs from today, I'm still going to be overweight. I'm going to be overweight until I'm not. I knew some things even before I started too.

    I feel like it's one of those things where if you spend ten seconds thinking about it you realize it doesn't make much sense, but as a person who's been approached and offered unsolicited advice a lot from I assume well-meaning people, hoo boy did that pop immediately to mind. I doubt it's something very prevalent among posters here, though.
    Because it's NOT uncommon for people of the same body types to hang with each other, I agree with this. When I have had to give some perspective to new clients, some get shocked at how much they actually have to lose to be in NORMAL weight category for themselves. Friends won't usually tell their friend they need to lose weight many times out of fear of offending them.
    So sometimes it's a myth to believe you fit in a size 8 when in reality it may be a size 12. You fit in that size 8 for THAT CLOTHING LINE.



    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member, Premium Posts: 25,241 Member Member, Premium Posts: 25,241 Member
    The ones that annoy me the most are "rules" that make no sense...

    -Don't eat any ingredients that you can't pronounce.
    -Only shop the perimeter of the grocery store, not the middle.
    -Don't eat after 7pm.
    -Don't eat white foods.

    So much wrong...

    In the case of the bolded "rule" - the way most grocery stores are laid out, you'll find most of the whole foods around the perimeter of the store and most of the packaged foods in the aisles. I think it's a useful guideline for someone learning or re-learning how to shop for nutritious food, but yeah, there's nothing magic about it otherwise.

    Also re: not eating after 7 PM, they call that intermittent fasting now and it's trendy.

    I do agree with you on the "nothing you can't pronounce" and "nothing white" rules, though. If you just blindly apply the rule without trying to learn anything about what you're doing and why it works (or doesn't), that's the kind of anti-intellectual BS that got all your high school friends hitting you up to join their pyramid scheme and we could do with less of it, as a species.

    I don't think it's useful, though. First of all, I'd challenge that "most" grocery stores are laid out a certain way. A lot of the big chains have been re-designing their stores in recent years. In mine (Kroger), the produce is in the middle of the store, and the bakery, ice cream, frozen pizzas, etc are on the perimeter.

    Plus, as mentioned, some very nutritious staple foods can be found in the shelf-stable aisles....beans, rice, canned vegetables, etc.

    I think that adults can learn to identify foods that meet their goals without being told that certain aisles of the store are naughty. I think that's what I dislike the most about these "rules"...they treat people as children who need black-and-white, yes-or-no parameters, instead of adults who can reason and think and make appropriate, educated decisions.

    Yeah, you've pinpointed what makes most "diet rules" so annoying to me. They're based on the assumption that we're too stupid to flip over a package and figure out for ourselves what fits into our plan.

    But honestly, it's easier for me to read a label on a soup can than it is to never buy shelf stable food again. And understanding my calorie and macronutrient needs requires a bit more pre-work on my end, but once that's done I can sustainably eat in a bunch of different circumstances and still meet my goals. Someone who is relying on rules is going to be lost when they're traveling for work or remodeling their kitchen for two weeks or going to a party because the rules won't necessarily work in those situations.
  • Speakeasy76Speakeasy76 Member Posts: 456 Member Member Posts: 456 Member
    In fitness (especially strength training): more is better, or quantity over quality. I see this in terms of people doing every move possible when targeting a body part, and in adding more weight before they're really ready and their form taking a big hit.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,096 Member Member Posts: 7,096 Member
    The ones that annoy me the most are "rules" that make no sense...

    -Don't eat any ingredients that you can't pronounce.
    -Only shop the perimeter of the grocery store, not the middle.
    -Don't eat after 7pm.
    -Don't eat white foods.

    So much wrong...

    In the case of the bolded "rule" - the way most grocery stores are laid out, you'll find most of the whole foods around the perimeter of the store and most of the packaged foods in the aisles. I think it's a useful guideline for someone learning or re-learning how to shop for nutritious food, but yeah, there's nothing magic about it otherwise.

    Also re: not eating after 7 PM, they call that intermittent fasting now and it's trendy.

    I do agree with you on the "nothing you can't pronounce" and "nothing white" rules, though. If you just blindly apply the rule without trying to learn anything about what you're doing and why it works (or doesn't), that's the kind of anti-intellectual BS that got all your high school friends hitting you up to join their pyramid scheme and we could do with less of it, as a species.

    I don't think it's useful, though. First of all, I'd challenge that "most" grocery stores are laid out a certain way. A lot of the big chains have been re-designing their stores in recent years. In mine (Kroger), the produce is in the middle of the store, and the bakery, ice cream, frozen pizzas, etc are on the perimeter.

    Plus, as mentioned, some very nutritious staple foods can be found in the shelf-stable aisles....beans, rice, canned vegetables, etc.

    I think that adults can learn to identify foods that meet their goals without being told that certain aisles of the store are naughty. I think that's what I dislike the most about these "rules"...they treat people as children who need black-and-white, yes-or-no parameters, instead of adults who can reason and think and make appropriate, educated decisions.

    For once I waited to read to the end to post, and I'm glad, as this is exactly what I would have said.

    Apart from the fact that stores tend to be laid out in a variety of ways, and every store I've ever been to has both things like veg and high cal pre-made things on the aisles (and cheese, lovely cheese), among many other things, and a combination of necessary/healthful things and things I never buy in the middle, I really don't get the idea that adult humans need black and white rules to learn how to do something so simple as shop. I think we should be aiming for more understanding, not rules that obscure understanding.
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