5k Jogger to Ultra Runner in 14 weeks

Hi

Just started this programme. If you've completed the C25K it's the next step up and will lead in 14 weeks to you being able to complete a trail marathon.

You are expected to run 5 times a week and it builds up gradually to eventually doing a post marathon distance after 14 weeks. On the two 'rest' days you are expected to do cross exercise - walking, swimming or cycling. I'm adding to mine by biking 20 plus miles a day to work and back too.

Myself, wife and daughter are training for the Hardmoors Roseberry Topping 26.2 trail marathon on 14th December so have along way to go.

I know it sounds radical but the plan has been put together by Olympic Gold Medalist James Cracknell.

The first couple of weeks each have three 3 mile runs in them, a four and a 6.

If anybody is interested I'll post our full training plan here. You will lose weight with this programme.
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Replies

  • MissMormie
    MissMormie Posts: 359 Member
    Not saying it can't be done, but do take really good care of yourself, these type of programs can lead to overtraining. Also, if you haven't been doing 5ks for long your body probably isn't strong enough yet to take the extra load (tendons, ligaments, bones, muscles).

    If you're really listen to your body to see if it is attainable.
  • It's attainable, just takes effort.

    I went from 20 stone cyclist to 13 stone 10lb cyclist in the same three month period and did the C2C in 2 days and I'm a 46 years old ex Rugby Player who has had many operations. In the same time I built up from not being able to run at all to doing an 18 mile trail run.

    The trick is to not to try and race but to keep in your head that distance is the key. Get a Garmin watch, set a slow pace and stick to it no matter how good you feel. It works! I've done it before.
  • _Zardoz_
    _Zardoz_ Posts: 3,987 Member
    I'd be very interested to see the training plan.
  • OK, this plan is assuming you are already a regular 3 mile plus jogger

    Remember that distance is the key NOT speed or time. As always with all trail runs a combination of running and walking helps Try to run in the country on paths rather than on tarmac as it's easier on your feet and joints. It's amazing how quick your body does strengthen to do the distance.

    Get a camel pack and fill it with electrolytes. On the longer runs take nuts, seeds, chocolate & jelly babies and eat continually (four jelly babies a mile) and stop half way to eat. Take Ibuprofen with you to get you through the little niggles.

    Eat sensibly when you get home. Max 2k calories for a man for the day

    Week 1
    Mon 3 miles
    Tues 3 miles
    Weds cross
    Thur 3 Miles
    Fri Cross
    Sat 4 miles
    Sun 6 miles

    Week 2
    Mon cross
    Tues 3 miles
    Wed 3 miles
    Thur 3 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 5miles
    Sun 3 miles

    Week 3
    Mon 4miles
    Tues cross
    Wed 4 miles
    Thur 4 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6miles
    Sun 9 miles

    Week 4
    Mon cross
    Tues 5 miles
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6miles
    Sun 15 miles

    Week 5
    Mon cross
    Tues 5 miles
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 8miles
    Sun 18 miles


    Week 6
    Mon cross
    Tues cross
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6miles
    Sun 9 miles

    Week 7
    Mon cross
    Tues 5 miles
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6miles
    Sun 20 miles

    Week 8
    Mon cross
    Tues 5 miles
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat cross
    Sun 26.2 miles

    Week 9
    Mon cross
    Tues cross
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 8 miles
    Sun 15 miles

    Week 10
    Mon cross
    Tues 6miles
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 8 miles
    Sun 20 miles

    Week 11
    Mon cross
    Tues 6miles
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6 miles
    Sun 26.2 miles

    Week 12
    Mon cross
    Tues cross
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 10 miles
    Sun 15 miles

    Week 13
    Mon cross
    Tues cross
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 10 miles
    Sun 10 miles

    Week 14
    Mon cross
    Tues 3 miles
    Wed 3 miles
    Thur cross
    Fri cross
    Sat cross
    Sun Hardmoors 26.2 - come on!!!
  • Littlesmile
    Littlesmile Posts: 99 Member
    this really sounds tempting
  • _Zardoz_
    _Zardoz_ Posts: 3,987 Member
    There seems to be a hell of a jump between week 3 and 4. I can reasonably comfortably run 9 miles at present but stepping up next week and doing a 15 mile run seems like a huge step. Normal advice is 10% a week. I normally add around 20% and in my mind that's pushing it. I must admit I'm not convinced by this and the chance for injury or failure. Good luck anyway
  • steve2kay
    steve2kay Posts: 194 Member
    These are all steady runs? Any intervals or tempo runs in here? I thought shorter distance interval runs were good for building stamina.

    I did a plan to get me through a half marathon that involved interval and tempo runs in the week and then a long slow run at the weekend. I don't know much about it but it seemed to make sense when I read the plan.
  • You need to start week 1 and get the days in, if you feel confident at 5 miles you can change the week 1 & 2, 3 miles to 5 and the weekends to 6 & 9 respectively. You'll be improving every day and you'll get there.

    This plan is to get you to Ultra stage, that is more than a marathon. So you have to get some serious mileage in on a regular basis

    A similar plan worked for me to get me to the 18 mile stage before and finished in 3 hours 45 minutes o a very hilly trail course..

    There probably are other ways of getting to this point but this works for sure, I've done it. You can incorporate a slight increase into one or two of the mid week runs after week 4 but it's more about time on your feet as the aim is just complete the distance as this training is designed for trail running.

    I'm currently 17 lb over where I want to be after a lazy summer, but have already lost 7 lb this week biking and running while still eating.
  • madrose0715
    madrose0715 Posts: 463 Member
    tagging for future reference.
  • twoboysnmygirl
    twoboysnmygirl Posts: 161 Member
    This screams INJURY to me when I read it...but then again, I'm prone to it. Jumped one week from 5 miles to 8 (I had run 7, but not for about a month) and I'm out with an injury. (heel bursitis) I think I wouldn't make it through half this plan, but I'm guessing for those that already have a superstrong base and are not injury prone, it could be done. :)
  • rybo
    rybo Posts: 5,424 Member
    That's not going to be even the least bit enjoyable.
  • timeasterday
    timeasterday Posts: 1,368 Member
    That's not going to be even the least bit enjoyable.

    +1

    It's possible, but also very possible is injury, doctor's visits, and therapy. Personally I think 8 months to a year is more appropriate to work your way up to a marathon (even more for an ultra).
  • CarsonRuns
    CarsonRuns Posts: 3,039 Member
    This not a wise idea at all. It is a recipe for injury. There is absolutely no reason to jump from 5K to ultra in that short of a period of time. There are plenty of intermediate goals that are worthwhile. I just don't get why so many people feel like you have to run a marathon or longer to be considered a runner. Why not try for a 25 minute 5K? That still requires you to run nearly the same mileage that you would to train for a Half Marathon.

    Running endurance is not built up over a period of weeks and months. It takes YEARS to build a proper aerobic base AND to condition the muscles, tendons and ligaments to be able to handle the rigors of marathon training. You can't rush it. There are no shortcuts. You just have to run and gradually build your mileage.
  • bluefox9er
    bluefox9er Posts: 2,917 Member
    OK, this plan is assuming you are already a regular 3 mile plus jogger

    Remember that distance is the key NOT speed or time. As always with all trail runs a combination of running and walking helps Try to run in the country on paths rather than on tarmac as it's easier on your feet and joints. It's amazing how quick your body does strengthen to do the distance.

    Get a camel pack and fill it with electrolytes. On the longer runs take nuts, seeds, chocolate & jelly babies and eat continually (four jelly babies a mile) and stop half way to eat. Take Ibuprofen with you to get you through the little niggles.

    Eat sensibly when you get home. Max 2k calories for a man for the day

    Week 1
    Mon 3 miles
    Tues 3 miles
    Weds cross
    Thur 3 Miles
    Fri Cross
    Sat 4 miles
    Sun 6 miles

    Week 2
    Mon cross
    Tues 3 miles
    Wed 3 miles
    Thur 3 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 5miles
    Sun 3 miles

    Week 3
    Mon 4miles
    Tues cross
    Wed 4 miles
    Thur 4 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6miles
    Sun 9 miles

    Week 4
    Mon cross
    Tues 5 miles
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6miles
    Sun 15 miles

    Week 5
    Mon cross
    Tues 5 miles
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 8miles
    Sun 18 miles


    Week 6
    Mon cross
    Tues cross
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6miles
    Sun 9 miles

    Week 7
    Mon cross
    Tues 5 miles
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6miles
    Sun 20 miles

    Week 8
    Mon cross
    Tues 5 miles
    Wed 5 miles
    Thur 5 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat cross
    Sun 26.2 miles

    Week 9
    Mon cross
    Tues cross
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 8 miles
    Sun 15 miles

    Week 10
    Mon cross
    Tues 6miles
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 8 miles
    Sun 20 miles

    Week 11
    Mon cross
    Tues 6miles
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 6 miles
    Sun 26.2 miles

    Week 12
    Mon cross
    Tues cross
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 10 miles
    Sun 15 miles

    Week 13
    Mon cross
    Tues cross
    Wed 6 miles
    Thur 6 Miles
    Fri cross
    Sat 10 miles
    Sun 10 miles

    Week 14
    Mon cross
    Tues 3 miles
    Wed 3 miles
    Thur cross
    Fri cross
    Sat cross
    Sun Hardmoors 26.2 - come on!!!

    By all means go for it...looks like a recipe for injury to me, though.

    Is there a reason why you'd want to go from couch to 5k to Ultra distances in 14 weeks?

    Why not develop as a runner gradually increasing the distances, understanding how your body reacts to endurance training, and above all else, actually ENJOY running?

    I'd suggest you build a base of mileage before embarking on an Ultra type distance.
  • bluefox9er
    bluefox9er Posts: 2,917 Member
    It's attainable, just takes effort.

    I went from 20 stone cyclist to 13 stone 10lb cyclist in the same three month period and did the C2C in 2 days and I'm a 46 years old ex Rugby Player who has had many operations. In the same time I built up from not being able to run at all to doing an 18 mile trail run.

    The trick is to not to try and race but to keep in your head that distance is the key. Get a Garmin watch, set a slow pace and stick to it no matter how good you feel. It works! I've done it before.

    you should have your own TV show.
  • davemunger
    davemunger Posts: 1,139 Member
    This is definitely pushing it. I took a year to go from 5K to marathon and still had some injury issues. I think if you treat this marathon as if it was an ultra (although technically it's not) it could be possible to do this safely. The key would be to incorporate a lot of walking / easy running into the training, and mainly focus on building up the miles. Similarly you'd have to plan on walking for a good portion of the marathon itself.

    Cross-training and strength training could help to minimize the potential for injury.
  • joebeana
    joebeana Posts: 6 Member
    I did my first marathon last year after running very consistantly for almost 2 years. In my opinion, it would be a miracle if anybody who is a 3 mile jogger attempts this plan without getting injured. The total weekly mileage and long run mileage increases are more aggressiive than any training plan I have ever seen. In a 5 week stretch from 7-11, the long runs are going to be 20, 26.2, 15, 20, 26.2.

    I wish you all the luck in the world, please report back with your progress.
  • SonicDeathMonkey80
    SonicDeathMonkey80 Posts: 4,489 Member
    Pushing it? Sure. Leading up to my first full last Sunday, this is all I had, as in the last time I ran before Jan was probably over a year before:

    Jan - 15 run

    Feb - 35 run

    Mar - 56 run, 13 bike

    Apr - 54 run, 18 bike

    May - 34 run, 38 bike

    Jun - 84 run, 65 bike (HM 1:45:44, sprint tri)

    Jul - 79 run, 88 bike (35mi MTB race)

    Aug - 113, 64 bike (2 sprint tris)

    Sep - 8 Sep/FM: 4:27:29 (looking to keep mileage at 100)

    Oct - 6 Oct/FM, 27 Oct/FM
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,249 Member
    This not a wise idea at all. It is a recipe for injury. There is absolutely no reason to jump from 5K to ultra in that short of a period of time. There are plenty of intermediate goals that are worthwhile. I just don't get why so many people feel like you have to run a marathon or longer to be considered a runner. Why not try for a 25 minute 5K? That still requires you to run nearly the same mileage that you would to train for a Half Marathon.

    Running endurance is not built up over a period of weeks and months. It takes YEARS to build a proper aerobic base AND to condition the muscles, tendons and ligaments to be able to handle the rigors of marathon training. You can't rush it. There are no shortcuts. You just have to run and gradually build your mileage.

    Exactly what I was thinking.........
  • wolfgate
    wolfgate Posts: 321 Member
    Read Carson's post.

    A trail marathon can in no way, shape or form be described as "the next step up" from C25K.

    Yes, I understand some have done this successfully. Your odds of going down in flames, however, are much greater than your odds of success.