potatoes good or bad

1567810

Replies

  • jalarson23
    jalarson23 Posts: 62 Member
    All potatoes are good, but my fav are the 'sunlite' variety. Got them because all the other kind at the stand had a green cast to them, and discovered they are lower-calorie gram for gram to most other varieties I've seen (and grown local!). The skin is delicate and delicious and the flesh is creamy and buttery before even adding anything. Had one for dinner tonight. Bake until the skin is crispy, just a little salt and garlic... no butter needed. Nom.

    That sounds amazing!
  • verapal
    verapal Posts: 38 Member
    Potatoes are good. Too much potatoes are bad
  • GlamourVintage
    GlamourVintage Posts: 60 Member
    I love potatoes. It's really filling. I eat them everyday. I always fit them in my daily calorie allowance/goal.
  • williams969
    williams969 Posts: 2,528 Member
    GoGoMary4 wrote: »
    I use potatoes to get rid of leftovers. We have extra chili, veggies, beans, chicken etc. we toss it on a potato and you have lunch. With the focus on getting rid of leftovers we don't add cheese, bacon sour cream and all the usual potato toppings.

    Yep, we do the same at home. The loaded (with leftovers ;) ) potato IS the meal. So if it's 400-500 calories, well, that's a good meal number for me--plus it's very satiating. And loaded potato night is the best way to get my kids actually EXCITED about leftovers.
  • runner475
    runner475 Posts: 1,236 Member
    MrM27 wrote: »
    runner475 wrote: »
    sullus wrote: »
    sullus wrote: »
    laurielima wrote: »
    sullus wrote: »
    laurielima wrote: »
    potatoes good. what we put on them by the tablespoonfuls - bad bad bad.

    noooo .. the glycemic index of a baked potato is nearly 100. You can significantly reduce this by adding butter, cheese, bacon, and sour cream.

    ok lets do this guys suggestion., Homemade - Baked Potato, Fully Loaded W/Cheese, Bacon, Butter, Chives, Sour Cream, 1 potato 862 54 27 0 1,961 0

    862 calories for what he suggests we eat w the potato.

    If you think thats good have at it.

    Please define good, bad, healthy, and unhealthy. Thanks.

    For me, I would define an 862 calorie potato as bad. Very bad even.

    Perhaps, but we are looking at an arbitrary potato there. I have no doubt the poster who suggested it went fishing for an extreme example. There are no quantities for anything on there, so we don't really know anything about this potato and what's really on it.

    I do know that a medium russet potato, 1 oz cheddar, 2 T sour cream, 1 T butter, and 2 slices of bacon is 520 cal, not 862

    Besides calories do you care or watch for GI?

    Wondering b'coz if you are forget about calories Baked Russet Potato has GI of 111 for a serving size of 150 grams.

    Your best bets are to go for Yam GI of 54 for 150 gms of serving.

    If you don't care about GI then don't bother.

    You're forgetting to factor in the fact that the Russell Potato with a GI of 111 completely changes once you add the cheese, sour cream, bacon etc. GI rating is based on the ingestion of that solitary carb by itself. Once you add protein and/or fat it changes.

    I should have been more specific in my original post that my comment is meant for someone who has to watch their blood sugar. Actually I did "Besides calories do you care or watch for GI? " but I think you may have missed it.

    I'm very specifically targeting this post to get the attention of the audience who have to watch their blood sugar.

    YEAH!! sure I 100% agree to the bolded part but that holds true for folks with perfect endocrinology functioning. For those who don't their best bet would still be an option of yam/sweet potato instead.

    BTW I have no clue what's the difference between yam or sweet potato? They have different GI and calories and carbs for a serving size of 150 gms. Does anyone know? Please keep me posted. I'm interested.
  • Lisgetsfitter
    Lisgetsfitter Posts: 24 Member
    I like red potatoes roasted ...yum. I don't eat mashed potatoes (but I love them) I make mashed cauliflower in stead. Maybe two or three times per week would be fine.
  • HeySwoleSister
    HeySwoleSister Posts: 1,938 Member
    edited March 2015
    runner475 wrote: »
    MrM27 wrote: »
    runner475 wrote: »
    sullus wrote: »
    sullus wrote: »
    laurielima wrote: »
    sullus wrote: »
    laurielima wrote: »
    potatoes good. what we put on them by the tablespoonfuls - bad bad bad.

    noooo .. the glycemic index of a baked potato is nearly 100. You can significantly reduce this by adding butter, cheese, bacon, and sour cream.

    ok lets do this guys suggestion., Homemade - Baked Potato, Fully Loaded W/Cheese, Bacon, Butter, Chives, Sour Cream, 1 potato 862 54 27 0 1,961 0

    862 calories for what he suggests we eat w the potato.

    If you think thats good have at it.

    Please define good, bad, healthy, and unhealthy. Thanks.

    For me, I would define an 862 calorie potato as bad. Very bad even.

    Perhaps, but we are looking at an arbitrary potato there. I have no doubt the poster who suggested it went fishing for an extreme example. There are no quantities for anything on there, so we don't really know anything about this potato and what's really on it.

    I do know that a medium russet potato, 1 oz cheddar, 2 T sour cream, 1 T butter, and 2 slices of bacon is 520 cal, not 862

    Besides calories do you care or watch for GI?

    Wondering b'coz if you are forget about calories Baked Russet Potato has GI of 111 for a serving size of 150 grams.

    Your best bets are to go for Yam GI of 54 for 150 gms of serving.

    If you don't care about GI then don't bother.

    You're forgetting to factor in the fact that the Russell Potato with a GI of 111 completely changes once you add the cheese, sour cream, bacon etc. GI rating is based on the ingestion of that solitary carb by itself. Once you add protein and/or fat it changes.

    I should have been more specific in my original post that my comment is meant for someone who has to watch their blood sugar. Actually I did "Besides calories do you care or watch for GI? " but I think you may have missed it.

    I'm very specifically targeting this post to get the attention of the audience who have to watch their blood sugar.

    YEAH!! sure I 100% agree to the bolded part but that holds true for folks with perfect endocrinology functioning. For those who don't their best bet would still be an option of yam/sweet potato instead.

    BTW I have no clue what's the difference between yam or sweet potato? They have different GI and calories and carbs for a serving size of 150 gms. Does anyone know? Please keep me posted. I'm interested.

    A proper yam is a starchy tuber popular in many tropical climates.

    A sweet potato is an orange tuber sometimes served coated with lots of sugar, etc, in a dish referred to erroneously as "yams" in some regions of the US.

    White Potatoes (or other tints, they are often yellow, purple, or even magenta-fleshed) are other veggies grown under ground. They are not "bad for you," no more than the sweet potato. One has more potassium and Vitamin C, the other has more Vitamin A. They are in no way equivalent in taste profile and I really wish the "have one instead of the other" train would stop, because it's just silly.

    Edited due to my own reading comprehension fail.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    EWJLang wrote: »
    White Potatoes (or other tints, they are often yellow, purple, or even magenta-fleshed) are other veggies grown under ground. They are not "bad for you," no more than the sweet potato. One has more potassium and Vitamin C, the other has more Vitamin A. They are in no way equivalent in taste profile and I really wish the "have one instead of the other" train would stop, because it's just silly.

    Standing ovation.

    I really don't get the obsession for picking out some "ideal" or "better" food and then making that the one thing you eat. Like the kale vs. spinach posts, or the recent broccoli vs. asparagus thread, or the past questions about whether quinoa should replace rice or cous cous, etc. Foods are different and have different strengths, which is why eating a diverse diet (potatoes AND sweet potatoes--probably not in the same meal, though, that might be overkill if not actually Thanksgiving) seems like the sensible thing to do, to me, unless you don't like something or find that you personally react badly to it. (I don't buy the GI thing, since no one eats potatoes alone--as has been pointed out, you'd have to run the GL of the meal, if you were someone who cared about such things.)
  • paulaviki
    paulaviki Posts: 678 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    The idea of a sweetener on a sweet potato seems ick to me, but that's why taste is subjective. (Don't get me started on the unholy sweet potato/marshmallow thing.)

    Ditto this. I grew up thinking I hated sweet potatoes because no one I knew (literally no one) ever made them without added sugar or marshmallows.

    Being from the UK I can't even comprehend putting sugar or marshmallows on sweet potato. It sound so odd, when you roast them in a little oil they are so naturally sweet they don't need extra sugar! But then as I've never tasted them done that way I could be missing something delicious...
  • kristydi
    kristydi Posts: 781 Member
    edited March 2015
    paulaviki wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    The idea of a sweetener on a sweet potato seems ick to me, but that's why taste is subjective. (Don't get me started on the unholy sweet potato/marshmallow thing.)

    Ditto this. I grew up thinking I hated sweet potatoes because no one I knew (literally no one) ever made them without added sugar or marshmallows.

    Being from the UK I can't even comprehend putting sugar or marshmallows on sweet potato. It sound so odd, when you roast them in a little oil they are so naturally sweet they don't need extra sugar! But then as I've never tasted them done that way I could be missing something delicious...

    One of my favorite Thankgsgiving dishes is my grandmother's sweet potato casserole. It's mashed sweet potatos, milk, egg and sugar baked ina casserole dish topped with a cooked mix of chopped marashino cherries, crushed pineapple, sugar and pecans thickened with corn starch. It's basically dessert disguised as a side dish. But it's so yummy.

    I agree with you about the marshmallows.

    I do love a good plain roasted sweet potato too though.
  • flumi_f
    flumi_f Posts: 1,930 Member
    MrCoolGrim wrote: »
    boAuvFW.gif

    I love potatoes. Potatoes are magical.

    Luv it! And yes they are magical.

    The potassium in them helps me get rid of retained water from grains or sodium..... Potatoes are my friends ;-) It's just a question of how you cook them.

    IMO there are no bad foods per se....eat varied and watch the cals. Avoid the foods you don't tolerate well. Other than that, enjoy your food.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Like Need2Exerc1se I grew up eating sweet potatoes only on Thanksgiving in a marshmallow covered concoction. As a long time marshmallow hater, I concluded from this that I disliked sweet potatoes (loved potatoes, though). As an adult, when I started hosting Thanksgiving I recreated some of my favorite traditional family dishes and eliminated or reinvented some others, and went on a quest to find some workable sweet potato dish. Tried different casseroles, gnocci (didn't work out), putting them in the stuffing, so on. Was a little embarrassed when I finally realized that the main way I like sweet potatoes is simply roasted with nothing but olive oil and salt. Now I have them all the time.
  • jennifer_417
    jennifer_417 Posts: 12,346 Member
    Potatoes are delicious! Just make 'em fit your calorie deficit and you're fine!
  • Eudoxy
    Eudoxy Posts: 391 Member
    Good
  • neanderthin
    neanderthin Posts: 7,847 Member
    runner475 wrote: »
    MrM27 wrote: »
    runner475 wrote: »
    sullus wrote: »
    sullus wrote: »
    laurielima wrote: »
    sullus wrote: »
    laurielima wrote: »
    potatoes good. what we put on them by the tablespoonfuls - bad bad bad.

    noooo .. the glycemic index of a baked potato is nearly 100. You can significantly reduce this by adding butter, cheese, bacon, and sour cream.

    ok lets do this guys suggestion., Homemade - Baked Potato, Fully Loaded W/Cheese, Bacon, Butter, Chives, Sour Cream, 1 potato 862 54 27 0 1,961 0

    862 calories for what he suggests we eat w the potato.

    If you think thats good have at it.

    Please define good, bad, healthy, and unhealthy. Thanks.

    For me, I would define an 862 calorie potato as bad. Very bad even.

    Perhaps, but we are looking at an arbitrary potato there. I have no doubt the poster who suggested it went fishing for an extreme example. There are no quantities for anything on there, so we don't really know anything about this potato and what's really on it.

    I do know that a medium russet potato, 1 oz cheddar, 2 T sour cream, 1 T butter, and 2 slices of bacon is 520 cal, not 862

    Besides calories do you care or watch for GI?

    Wondering b'coz if you are forget about calories Baked Russet Potato has GI of 111 for a serving size of 150 grams.

    Your best bets are to go for Yam GI of 54 for 150 gms of serving.

    If you don't care about GI then don't bother.

    You're forgetting to factor in the fact that the Russell Potato with a GI of 111 completely changes once you add the cheese, sour cream, bacon etc. GI rating is based on the ingestion of that solitary carb by itself. Once you add protein and/or fat it changes.

    I should have been more specific in my original post that my comment is meant for someone who has to watch their blood sugar. Actually I did "Besides calories do you care or watch for GI? " but I think you may have missed it.

    I'm very specifically targeting this post to get the attention of the audience who have to watch their blood sugar.

    YEAH!! sure I 100% agree to the bolded part but that holds true for folks with perfect endocrinology functioning. For those who don't their best bet would still be an option of yam/sweet potato instead.

    BTW I have no clue what's the difference between yam or sweet potato? They have different GI and calories and carbs for a serving size of 150 gms. Does anyone know? Please keep me posted. I'm interested.
    You may want to venture out beyond the russet and look at the hundreds of other types, most of the waxy ones with GI's less than sweet potato.

  • Nony_Mouse
    Nony_Mouse Posts: 5,647 Member
    These are what we know as yams in New Zealand. They are unbelievably delicious.

    p-yams.jpg

    http://www.vegetables.co.nz/select_a_vegetable/yams.asp

    And sweet potatoes are known by their Maori name - kumara. They are also delicious. Why anyone would 'candy' them and add marshmallows is a mystery to me though. Roasted or made into chips (fries) is the way to go.

    Likewise, potatoes are delicious.

    It is entirely possibly (and often done) to have all three at once as part of a roast meal :D
  • NewBeginningBren
    NewBeginningBren Posts: 36 Member
    I luv potatoes, but, I can't have them now because they're too high in carbs for me.
  • kampshoff
    kampshoff Posts: 133 Member
    What, seven pages on potatoes and no Samwise?

    DraOC1o.gif

  • onyxgirl17
    onyxgirl17 Posts: 1,716 Member
    I love all the potatoes <3
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    paulaviki wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    The idea of a sweetener on a sweet potato seems ick to me, but that's why taste is subjective. (Don't get me started on the unholy sweet potato/marshmallow thing.)

    Ditto this. I grew up thinking I hated sweet potatoes because no one I knew (literally no one) ever made them without added sugar or marshmallows.

    Being from the UK I can't even comprehend putting sugar or marshmallows on sweet potato. It sound so odd, when you roast them in a little oil they are so naturally sweet they don't need extra sugar! But then as I've never tasted them done that way I could be missing something delicious...

    No, you are not. It is very odd. I can't imagine who first saw marshmallows and thought "Oh, wouldn't these be good on a sweet potato", but I'll bet they were stoned.